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Beaver County, Pennsylvania
Beaver County Courthouse, Pennsylvania.jpg
Beaver County Courthouse
Seal of Beaver County, Pennsylvania
Seal
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Beaver County
Location in the state of Pennsylvania
Map of the U.S. highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Founded March 12, 1800
Named for Beaver River
Seat Beaver
Largest city Aliquippa
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

444 sq mi (1,150 km²)
435 sq mi (1,127 km²)
9.3 sq mi (24 km²), 2.1%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

168,215
379/sq mi (146/km²)
Congressional district 17th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.beavercountypa.gov
Footnotes:
Invalid designation
Designated: July 5, 1982[1]

Beaver County is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 168,215.[2] Its county seat is Beaver.[3] The county was created on March 12, 1800, from parts of Allegheny and Washington Counties.[4] It took its name from the Beaver River.[5]

Beaver County is part of the Pittsburgh, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

The original townships at the date of the erection of Beaver County (1800) were North Beaver, east and west of the Big Beaver Creek; South Beaver, west of the Big Beaver; and Sewickley, east of the Big Beaver—all north of the Ohio River; and Hanover, First Moon, and Second Moon, south of the Ohio.[6]

Original Townships of Beaver County, Pennsylvania, 1800.tif

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 444 square miles (1,150 km2), of which 435 square miles (1,130 km2) is land and 9.3 square miles (24 km2) (2.1%) is water.[7] It has a humid continental climate (Dfa/Dfb) and average monthly temperatures in the Beaver/Rochester vicinity range from 29.4 °F in January to 73.2 °F in July.[8]

Bodies of water[]

  • The Ohio River flows north through Beaver County from a point near Ambridge, then turns west near Beaver and on to the Ohio and West Virginia borders. It divides the southern third of the county from the northern two-thirds.
  • The Beaver River flows south from Lawrence County entering Beaver County near Koppel and continuing south to its confluence with the Ohio near Beaver.

Adjacent counties[]

Protected areas[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1800 5,776
1810 12,168 110.7%
1820 15,340 26.1%
1830 24,183 57.6%
1840 29,368 21.4%
1850 26,689 −9.1%
1860 29,140 9.2%
1870 36,148 24.0%
1880 39,605 9.6%
1890 50,077 26.4%
1900 56,432 12.7%
1910 78,253 38.7%
1920 111,621 42.6%
1930 149,062 33.5%
1940 156,754 5.2%
1950 175,192 11.8%
1960 206,948 18.1%
1970 208,418 0.7%
1980 204,441 −1.9%
1990 186,093 −9.0%
2000 181,412 −2.5%
2010 170,539 −6.0%
[9]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 181,412 people, 72,576 households, and 50,512 families residing in the county. The population density was 418 people per square mile (161/km2). There were 77,765 housing units at an average density of 179 per square mile (69/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.55% White, 5.96% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 0.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.0% were of German, 17.4% Italian, 9.9% Irish, 6.5% English, 6.4% Polish and 5.8% American ancestry.

There were 72,576 households, out of which 28.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.50% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. Of all households 26.90% were made up of individuals, and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the age distribution of the population shows 22.60% under the age of 18, 7.40% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 18.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.20 males.

Birth rate

Beaver County's live birth rate was 2,437 births in 1990. Beaver County's live birth rate in 2000 was 1,891 births, while in 2011 it had declined to 1,690 babies.[11] Over the past 50 years (1960 to 2010), rural Pennsylvania saw a steady decline in both the number and proportion of residents under 18 years old. In 1960, 1.06 million rural residents, or 35 percent of the rural population, were children.

Teen pregnancy rate

Beaver County reported 1,069 babies born to teens (age 15–19) in 2011. In 2015, the number of teen births in Beaver County was 1,025.[12]

County poverty demographics

According to research by The Center for Rural Pennsylvania, which is a legislative Agency of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the poverty rate for Beaver County was 11.7% in 2014.[13] The statewide poverty rate was 13.6% in 2014. The 2012 childhood poverty rate by school district was: Ambridge Area School District: 40.6% living at 185% or below than the Federal Poverty Level; Aliquippa School District: 82.7%; Beaver Area School District: 17.4%; Big Beaver Falls Area School District: 71.3%; Blackhawk School District: 27.9%; Central Valley School District: 30.8%; Freedom Area School District: 40.8%, Hopewell Area School District: 24.9%; Midland Borough School District: 64.9%; New Brighton Area School District: 54.4%; Riverside Beaver County School District: 31.9%; Rochester Area High School: 66.3%; South Side Area School District: 31.5%; and Western Beaver County School District: 36.5%.[14] The child poverty rate is collected by the school districts as part of the federal free school lunch program.

Government and politics[]

United States presidential election results for Beaver County, Pennsylvania[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 54,759 58.01% 38,122 40.38% 1,516 1.61%
2016 48,167 57.03% 32,531 38.52% 3,764 4.46%
2012 42,344 52.41% 37,055 45.86% 1,394 1.73%
2008 42,895 50.45% 40,499 47.63% 1,638 1.93%
2004 39,916 48.36% 42,146 51.06% 481 0.58%
2000 32,491 44.12% 38,925 52.85% 2,233 3.03%
1996 26,048 35.07% 39,578 53.28% 8,653 11.65%
1992 21,361 25.94% 44,877 54.50% 16,102 19.56%
1988 25,764 33.69% 50,327 65.81% 378 0.49%
1984 32,052 36.79% 54,765 62.86% 300 0.34%
1980 30,496 38.23% 43,955 55.11% 5,314 6.66%
1976 33,593 41.40% 46,117 56.83% 1,440 1.77%
1972 43,637 56.42% 31,570 40.82% 2,130 2.75%
1968 28,264 34.46% 45,396 55.34% 8,368 10.20%
1964 23,174 27.59% 60,492 72.02% 327 0.39%
1960 36,796 43.71% 47,182 56.04% 212 0.25%
1956 38,263 51.21% 36,373 48.68% 79 0.11%
1952 31,700 45.18% 38,136 54.35% 334 0.48%
1948 22,324 43.83% 26,629 52.28% 1,983 3.89%
1944 23,555 41.57% 32,743 57.79% 360 0.64%
1940 24,324 41.78% 33,609 57.73% 282 0.48%
1936 20,223 34.68% 37,205 63.80% 884 1.52%
1932 19,751 47.87% 19,805 48.00% 1,704 4.13%
1928 27,949 69.50% 11,868 29.51% 400 0.99%
1924 16,768 64.14% 3,220 12.32% 6,153 23.54%
1920 11,691 62.90% 4,771 25.67% 2,124 11.43%
1916 6,864 48.67% 5,805 41.16% 1,434 10.17%
1912 2,759 21.89% 3,037 24.10% 6,806 54.01%
1908 7,008 55.95% 4,200 33.53% 1,318 10.52%
1904 7,122 68.88% 2,342 22.65% 876 8.47%
1900 6,759 60.11% 4,076 36.25% 409 3.64%
1896 6,842 59.95% 4,322 37.87% 248 2.17%
1892 4,890 52.04% 3,822 40.68% 684 7.28%
1888 5,552 58.23% 3,706 38.87% 276 2.89%
1884 5,075 56.51% 3,546 39.48% 360 4.01%
1880 4,700 56.40% 3,498 41.97% 136 1.63%



Voter registration[]

In November 2008, there were 118,269 registered voters in Beaver County.

  • Democratic: 70,819 (59.88%)
  • Republican: 36,239 (30.64%)
  • Other parties/non-partisan: 11,211 (9.48%)

By April 2016, there were 109,091 registered voters, a decrease of 7.7% since 2008.

The county is divided into 129 precincts.[16]

  • Democratic: 58,828 (53.93%)
  • Republican: 38,015 (34.85%)
  • Other parties/non-partisan: 12,248 (11.23%)

As of 2 November 2021, there were 112,744 registered voters in the county. Democrats held a plurality of voters. There were 51,226 registered Democrats, 46,418 registered Republicans, 14,404 voters registered to other parties, 610 to the Libertarian Party and 86 voters registered to the Green Party.[17]



Circle frame.svg

Voter registration

  Democratic (45.44%)
  Republican (41.17%)
  NPA/other parties (12.78%)
  Libertarian (0.54%)
  Green (0.08%)
Voter registration and party enrollment
Party Number of voters Percentage
Template:Party color cell Democratic 51,226 45.44
Template:Party color cell Republican 46,418 41.17
Template:Party color cell Others 14,404 12.78
Template:Party color cell Libertarian 610 0.54
Template:Party color cell Green 86 0.08
Total 112,744 100%

Political history[]

Beaver County used to be a Democratic stronghold, and still has a large Democratic edge in registration. In 2015, however, the GOP took majority status in the Commissioners' Office for the first time since 1955. Multiple Democratic seats in both houses of the Pennsylvania Legislature have been lost to Republicans over the past few years. In statewide and federal elections it has been moving rightward as well. In 2004 Democrat John Kerry won Beaver County over Republican George Bush 51% to 48%. In 2008 Republican John McCain defeated Democrat Barack Obama 50% to 47%, becoming the first Republican to win there since 1972 and only the third since 1928. Mitt Romney and Donald Trump (twice) carried the county in the next three elections, cementing its status as a "red county" in presidential politics.

Each of the three state row office winners carried Beaver. In 2010 Republican Governor Tom Corbett and Republican Senator Pat Toomey both carried Beaver in their successful statewide bids. However, Beaver County voted for Bob Casey Jr. in his reelection bid in 2012 50% to 47%.

County commissioners[]

Commissioner Party Title
Daniel C. Camp III Republican Chairman
Tony Amadio Democratic
Jack Manning[18] Republican

County officials[]

Office Official Party
Clerk of Courts Judy Enslen Democratic
Controller Maria Longo[19] Republican
Coroner David Gabauer Republican
District Attorney David Lozier Republican
Prothonotary Michael Rossi[20] Democratic
Recorder Ronald Alberti[21] Republican
Sheriff Ian Sambol Democratic
Treasurer Sandie Egley[22] Republican

State representatives[]

District Representative Party
10 Aaron Bernstine Republican
14 Jim Marshall Republican
15 Josh Kail Republican
16 Robert Matzie Democratic

State senators[]

District Senator Party
46 Camera Bartolotta Republican
47 Elder Vogel Republican

United States House of Representatives[]

District Representative Party
17 Conor Lamb Democratic

United States Senate[]

Senator Party
Bob Casey Jr. Democratic
Pat Toomey Republican

Attractions[]

Beaver County offers many shops and places to eat. Beaver County is home to the Beaver Valley Mall in Center Township, which has shops and restaurants.

Near Koppel there is Buttermilk Falls,[23] a naturally occurring waterfall.

In Brighton Township there is Brady's Run Park.[24]

Transportation[]

Major roads and highways[]

  • I-76.svg Interstate 76 (the Pennsylvania Turnpike)
  • I-376.svg Interstate 376
  • US 30.svg US Route 30 (the Lincoln Highway)
  • PA-18.svg Pennsylvania Route 18
  • PA-51.svg Pennsylvania Route 51
  • PA-65.svg Pennsylvania Route 65
  • PA-68.svg Pennsylvania Route 68
  • PA-168.svg Pennsylvania Route 168
  • PA-351.svg Pennsylvania Route 351

Airports[]

  • Beaver County Airport
  • Zelienople Municipal Airport

Public transit[]

Public transit is provided by the Beaver County Transit Authority.

Education[]

Colleges and universities[]

  • Geneva College
  • Penn State Beaver Campus
  • Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry
  • Community College of Beaver County

Community, junior, and technical colleges[]

  • Community College of Beaver County

Map of Beaver County, Pennsylvania public school districts. Note that two districts on this map, Monaca School District and Center Area School District, merged in 2009 to form the Central Valley School District.

Public school districts[]

  • Aliquippa School District
  • Ambridge Area School District
  • Beaver Area School District
  • Big Beaver Falls Area School District
  • Blackhawk School District (part)
  • Central Valley School District
  • Freedom Area School District
  • Hopewell Area School District
  • Midland Borough School District
  • New Brighton Area School District
  • Riverside Beaver County School District
  • Rochester Area School District
  • South Side Area School District
  • Western Beaver County School District

The 498 school districts of Pennsylvania that have high schools were ranked for student academic achievement as demonstrated by three years of math and reading PSSA results by the Pittsburgh Business Times[25] in 2008.

High schools[]

  • Aliquippa High School
  • Ambridge Area High School
  • Beaver Area High School
  • Beaver County Christian High School
  • Beaver Falls High School
  • Big Beaver Area High School
  • Blackhawk High School
  • Central Valley High School
  • Freedom Area High School
  • Hopewell High School
  • Lincoln Park Performing Arts Charter School
  • New Brighton High School
  • Quigley Catholic High School
  • Riverside High School
  • Rochester Area High School
  • South Side Beaver High School
  • Western Beaver High School

Charter schools[]

As reported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education – EdNA, as of April 2010.

  • Baden Academy Charter School[26]
  • Lincoln Park Performing Arts Charter School
  • Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School

Private schools[]

As reported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education – EdNA, as of April 2010.

  • Agapeland Children Garden – Beaver
  • Beaver County Christian School -Upper – Beaver Falls
  • Beaver Co Christian -West Park Elementary – Beaver Falls
  • Bethel Christian School – Aliquippa
  • Deliverance Temple Ministries ROOTS Inc Christian Academy – Aliquippa
  • Divine Mercy Academy – Beaver Falls
  • Hope Christian Academy – Aliquippa
  • North Hills Christian School – Baden
  • Our Lady of Fatima School – Aliquippa
  • Pleasant Hill Wesleyan Academy – Hookstown
  • Quigley Catholic High School – Baden
  • St John the Baptist School – Monaca
  • Sts Peter & Paul School – Beaver
  • Sylvania Hills Christian – Rochester

Former school districts[]

In 2009, Center Area School District and Monaca School District merged to form Central Valley School District.

Communities[]

Map of Beaver County, Pennsylvania with municipal labels showing cities and boroughs (red), townships (white), and census-designated places (blue)

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following cities, boroughs and townships are in Beaver County:

Cities[]

Boroughs[]

  • Ambridge
  • Baden
  • Beaver (county seat)
  • Big Beaver
  • Bridgewater
  • Conway
  • Darlington
  • East Rochester
  • Eastvale
  • Economy
  • Ellwood City (mostly in Lawrence County)
  • Fallston
  • Frankfort Springs
  • Freedom
  • Georgetown
  • Glasgow
  • Homewood
  • Hookstown
  • Industry
  • Koppel
  • Midland
  • Monaca
  • New Brighton
  • New Galilee
  • Ohioville
  • Patterson Heights
  • Rochester
  • Shippingport
  • South Heights
  • West Mayfield

Townships[]

  • Brighton
  • Center
  • Chippewa
  • Darlington
  • Daugherty
  • First Moon (extinct)
  • Franklin
  • Greene
  • Hanover
  • Harmony
  • Hopewell
  • Independence
  • Marion
  • Moon (extinct)
  • New Sewickley
  • North Sewickley
  • Patterson
  • Potter
  • Pulaski
  • Raccoon
  • Rochester
  • Second Moon (extinct)
  • Sewickley (extinct)
  • South Beaver
  • Vanport
  • White

Census-designated places[]

  • Harmony Township
  • Patterson Township

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Byersdale
  • Cannelton
  • Fombell
  • Frisco
  • Gringo
  • Harshaville
  • Kobuta

Former community[]

  • Borough Township – established in 1804 from the small southeast corner of South Beaver Township. In 1970, it was renamed Vanport Township.[27]

Population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Beaver County.[28]

county seat

Rank City/town/etc. Population (2010 Census) Municipal type Incorporated
1 Aliquippa 9,438 City 1928 (borough) 1987 (city)
2 Beaver Falls 8,987 City 1868 (borough) 1928 (city)
3 Economy 8,970 Borough 1957
4 Ellwood City (partially in Lawrence County) 7,921 Borough
5 Ambridge 7,050 Borough 1905
6 New Brighton 6,025 Borough 1838
7 Monaca 5,737 Borough 1840
8 Beaver 4,531 Borough 1802
9 Baden 4,135 Borough 1868
10 Rochester 3,657 Borough 1849
11 Ohioville 3,533 Borough 1860
12 Harmony Township 3,197 CDP and township 1851
13 Patterson Township 3,029 CDP and township 1845
14 Midland 2,635 Borough 1906
15 Conway 2,176 Borough 1902
16 Big Beaver 1,970 Borough 1858
17 Industry 1,835 Borough 1960
18 Freedom 1,569 Borough 1838
19 West Mayfield 1,239 Borough 1923
20 Koppel 762 Borough 1910
21 Bridgewater 704 Borough 1835
22 Patterson Heights 636 Borough 1899
23 East Rochester 567 Borough 1908
24 South Heights 475 Borough 1910
25 New Galilee 379 Borough 1854
26 Fallston 266 Borough 1829
27 Darlington 254 Borough 1820
28 Eastvale 225 Borough 1892
29 Shippingport 214 Borough 1910
30 Georgetown 174 Borough 1850
31 Hookstown 147 Borough 1843
32 Frankfort Springs 130 Borough 1844
33 Homewood 109 Borough 1910
34 Glasgow 60 Borough 1854

Notable people[]

  • Sam Adams – early explorer of the American west
  • Gust AvrakotosCIA operative active in Operation Cyclone
  • Julian Michael Carver – science fiction novelist known for his usage of dinosaurs in fiction[29]
  • Jim Covert – former NFL offensive tackle for the Chicago Bears, inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003
  • Ed DeChellis – head men's basketball coach for The Naval Academy
  • Mike Ditka – former NFL tight end for the Chicago Bears, Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys, and head coach for the Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints, inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1988 (as a tight end)
  • Tony Dorsett – former NFL running back for the Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos, inducted into both the Pro and College Football Hall of Fame in 1994
  • Shane Douglas – born Troy Martin, professional wrestler, best known with Extreme Championship Wrestling, having also wrestled for World Championship Wrestling, Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, and (briefly) with the World Wrestling Federation
  • Terry Francona – former Major League Baseball first baseman and outfielder for the Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians and Milwaukee Brewers, and former manager for the Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox
  • Sean Gilbert – former NFL defensive lineman for the Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, Washington Redskins, Carolina Panthers and Oakland Raiders
  • Donnie Iris – musician, former member of The Jaggerz and Wild Cherry, also notable for his solo performances
  • Ty Law – former NFL cornerback for the New England Patriots, New York Jets, Kansas City Chiefs and Denver Broncos
  • Joe Letteri – three-time Academy Award-winning visual imaging artist, and visual effects supervisor of the movie Avatar
  • Henry Mancini – music composer, including "Moon River" and "The Pink Panther Theme", among many others
  • "Pistol" Pete Maravich – former NBA guard for the Atlanta Hawks, New Orleans/Utah Jazz and Boston Celtics, inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1987
  • Press Maravich – former NCAA Basketball coach
  • Doc Medich – former Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates, Oakland Athletics, Seattle Mariners, New York Mets, Texas Rangers and Milwaukee Brewers
  • Ryan "Archie" Miller - former NCAA Basketball coach for the Dayton Flyers and Indiana Hoosiers
  • Sean Miller - former NCAA Basketball coach for the Arizona Wildcats
  • Joe Namath – former NFL and AFL quarterback for the New York Jets and Los Angeles Rams, inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1985
  • Babe Parilli – former NFL and AFL quarterback for the Green Bay Packers, Cleveland Browns, Oakland Raiders, Boston Patriots and New York Jets, former CFL quarterback for the Ottawa Rough Riders, and All-American quarterback for the University of Kentucky
  • Paul Posluszny – NFL linebacker for the Jacksonville Jaguars
  • Dan Radakovich – Athletics Director for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets
  • Darrelle Revis – NFL cornerback for the New York Jets
  • Jesse Steinfeld – former Surgeon General of the United States
  • Pete Suder – former Major League Baseball infielder for the Philadelphia Athletics/Kansas City Athletics
  • Mark Vlasic – former NFL quarterback for the San Diego Chargers, Kansas City Chiefs and Tampa Bay Buccaneers
  • William Ziegler – industrialist and co-founder of the Royal Baking Powder Company

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Beaver County, Pennsylvania
  • Ohio River Trail

References[]

  1. ^ "PHMC Historical Markers Search" (Searchable database). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/pennsylvania_historical_marker_program/2539/search_for_historical_markers. 
  2. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/42/42007.html. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ Laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 4 vols. (Philadelphia: John Bioren, 1810), vol. 3, pages 421–422, Chapter MMCXIX, Section 1, "An Act to erect certain parts of Allegheny, Westmoreland, Washington and Lycoming counties, into separate counties," 12 March 1800, creation of Beaver County, digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com : 22 July 2018).
  5. ^ Hoover, Gladys L. (September 18, 1974). "County Got its Name From Stream". Beaver County Times: pp. C11. https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Of0qAAAAIBAJ&sjid=btoFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1282%2C757688. 
  6. ^ Joseph Henderson Bausman, History of Beaver County, Pennsylvania: And Its Centennial Celebration, 2 volumes (New York: Knickerbocker Press, 1904), vol. 2, pp. 863–864; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com : accessed 2 Nov 2018).
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_42.txt. 
  8. ^ "PRISM Climate Group at Oregon State University". http://prism.oregonstate.edu/explorer/. 
  9. ^ "Census 2020". https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/beavercountypennsylvania/PST045219. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  11. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Health, Birth Age County Reports 1990 and 2011, 2011
  12. ^ Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2016). "Pennsylvania Teen Births 2015". http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/app/pennsylvania/2011/measure/factors/14/data. 
  13. ^ US Census Bureau (2015). "Poverty Rates by County Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates". http://www.rural.palegislature.us/demographics_datagram_poverty_rates_pa.html. 
  14. ^ Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (2012). "Student Poverty Concentration 2012". http://pennbpc.org/education-facts-school-poverty-data. 
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  16. ^ "2016 General Primary Results". Beaver County, Pennsylvania. May 10, 2016. http://files.beavercountypa.gov/ElectionResults/20160426/EL45.HTM. 
  17. ^ Pennsylvania Department of State (2 November 2021). "2021 Voter Registration Statistics". https://www.dos.pa.gov/VotingElections/OtherServicesEvents/VotingElectionStatistics/Documents/2021%20Election%20VR%20Stats.pdf. 
  18. ^ "Board of Commissioners". http://www.beavercountypa.gov/Depts/Commissioners/Pages/default.aspx. 
  19. ^ "Welcome to the Office of the Controller". http://www.beavercountypa.gov/Depts/Controllers/Pages/default.aspx. 
  20. ^ "Welcome to the Prothonotary Office". http://www.beavercountypa.gov/Depts/Protho/Pages/default.aspx. 
  21. ^ "Welcome to the Recorder of Deeds". http://www.beavercountypa.gov/Depts/RecDeeds/Pages/default.aspx. 
  22. ^ "Welcome to the Treasurer's Office". http://www.beavercountypa.gov/Depts/Treasurer/Pages/default.aspx. 
  23. ^ Buttermilk Falls
  24. ^ [1]
  25. ^ Pittsburgh Business Times
  26. ^ "Baden Academy Charter School". http://badenacademy.org. 
  27. ^ "Archived copy". http://www.beavercountypa.gov/history-beaver-county. 
  28. ^ "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html. 
  29. ^ Kelly, Joey. "Page Turners: Profiles of Beaver Valley authors". https://www.timesonline.com/entertainmentlife/20191004/page-turners-profiles-of-beaver-valley-authors. 

External links[]

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Coordinates: 40°41′N 80°21′W / 40.69, -80.35


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