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Bedford County, Tennessee
Bedford County Tennessee Courthouse.jpg
Bedford County courthouse in Shelbyville
Seal of Bedford County, Tennessee
Seal
Map of Tennessee highlighting Bedford County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the U.S. highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Founded December 7, 1807[1]
Named for Thomas Bedford, early settler[2]
Seat Shelbyville
Largest city Shelbyville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

475 sq mi (1,230 km²)
474 sq mi (1,228 km²)
1.2 sq mi (3 km²), 0.2%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

50,237 increase
105.99/sq mi (41/km²)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website http://www.bedfordcountytn.org/

Bedford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 50,237.[3] Its county seat is Shelbyville.[4] Bedford County comprises the Shelbyville, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, TN Combined Statistical Area.

History[]

The county was created in 1807 when the citizens of Rutherford County living south of the Duck River and the Stones River successfully petitioned the governor to split Rutherford County in two. The new county was named after American Revolutionary War officer and large landowner in the area, Thomas Bedford.

Once the state's largest and most populous county, Bedford County's size (in terms of area) has been steadily reduced since 1809 to form Coffee County, Moore County, Lincoln County, and Marshall County.[5]

The county was pro-Confederate during the Civil War, but Shelbyville was mostly loyal to the Union.

Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest was born in 1821 in Chapel Hill (now in Marshall County) and has no connection to naming of Bedford County. It was named after the Revolutionary War officer Thomas Bedford.[6]

Texas pioneer William Whitaker Reed was born in Bedford County in 1816.[7]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 475 square miles (1,230 km2), of which 474 square miles (1,230 km2) is land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) (0.2%) is water.[8]

Adjacent counties[]

State protected areas[]

  • Normandy Wildlife Management Area (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 8,242
1820 16,012 94.3%
1830 30,396 89.8%
1840 20,546 −32.4%
1850 21,511 4.7%
1860 21,584 0.3%
1870 24,333 12.7%
1880 26,025 7.0%
1890 24,739 −4.9%
1900 23,845 −3.6%
1910 22,667 −4.9%
1920 21,737 −4.1%
1930 21,077 −3.0%
1940 23,151 9.8%
1950 23,627 2.1%
1960 23,150 −2.0%
1970 25,039 8.2%
1980 27,916 11.5%
1990 30,411 8.9%
2000 37,586 23.6%
2010 45,058 19.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2020[3]

Age pyramid, Bedford County[13]

2020 census[]

Bedford County racial composition[14]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 36,499 72.65%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 3,563 7.09%
Native American 127 0.25%
Asian 337 0.67%
Pacific Islander 13 0.03%
Other/Mixed 2,033 4.05%
Hispanic or Latino 7,665 15.26%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 50,237 people, 17,029 households, and 12,704 families residing in the county.

2000 census[]

As of the census of 2000, there were 37,586 people, 13,905 households, and 10,345 families residing in the county. The population density was 79 people per square mile (31/km2). There were 14,990 housing units at an average density of 32 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 86.84% White, 11.48% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.73% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. 7.48% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,905 households, out of which 34.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.30% were married couples living together, 11.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.60% were non-families. 21.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.80% under the age of 18, 9.90% from 18 to 24, 29.70% from 25 to 44, 22.00% from 45 to 64, and 12.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,729, and the median income for a family was $33,691. Males had a median income of $25,485 versus $15,673 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,698. About 12.70% of families and 25.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.90% of those under age 18 and 17.80% of those age 65 or over.


Communities[]

City[]

  • Shelbyville (county seat)

Towns[]

  • Bell Buckle
  • Normandy
  • Wartrace

Census-designated place[]

  • Unionville

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Branchville
  • Bugscuffe
  • Center Grove
  • Cortner's Station
  • Fairfield
  • Fall Creek
  • Flat Creek
  • Haley's Station
  • Hawthorne
  • Mount Harmond
  • Palmetto
  • Pleasant Grove
  • Poplin's Crossroads
  • Raus
  • Richmond
  • Roseville
  • Rover
  • Wheel

Major highways[]

  • Interstate 24
  • U.S. Route 41A
  • U.S. Route 231
  • State Route 16
  • State Route 64
  • State Route 82
  • State Route 130
  • State Route 269
  • State Route 270
  • State Route 276
  • State Route 437

Politics[]

Bedford County is a Republican stronghold. The last Democrat to carry this county was Al Gore in 2000.

United States presidential election results for Bedford County, Tennessee[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 14,354 75.20% 4,453 23.33% 281 1.47%
2016 11,486 74.80% 3,395 22.11% 474 3.09%
2012 10,034 69.46% 4,211 29.15% 200 1.38%
2008 10,217 65.89% 5,027 32.42% 263 1.70%
2004 8,351 60.93% 5,268 38.44% 87 0.63%
2000 5,911 48.42% 6,136 50.27% 160 1.31%
1996 4,634 41.07% 5,735 50.82% 915 8.11%
1992 3,836 33.59% 5,978 52.34% 1,607 14.07%
1988 4,856 54.32% 4,046 45.26% 37 0.41%
1984 4,699 50.55% 4,499 48.40% 98 1.05%
1980 3,377 35.24% 5,987 62.48% 219 2.29%
1976 3,023 29.19% 7,228 69.79% 106 1.02%
1972 4,262 59.73% 2,565 35.95% 308 4.32%
1968 1,870 22.30% 2,416 28.81% 4,099 48.88%
1964 2,272 28.83% 5,610 71.17% 0 0.00%
1960 2,633 36.81% 4,457 62.32% 62 0.87%
1956 2,258 33.08% 4,517 66.18% 50 0.73%
1952 2,611 37.44% 4,362 62.56% 0 0.00%
1948 771 17.93% 2,393 55.64% 1,137 26.44%
1944 733 21.51% 2,651 77.81% 23 0.68%
1940 555 18.05% 2,499 81.29% 20 0.65%
1936 514 17.36% 2,428 82.00% 19 0.64%
1932 630 21.74% 2,264 78.12% 4 0.14%
1928 1,405 47.84% 1,532 52.16% 0 0.00%
1924 925 33.23% 1,799 64.62% 60 2.16%
1920 2,056 48.51% 2,182 51.49% 0 0.00%
1916 1,324 33.92% 2,578 66.05% 1 0.03%
1912 1,474 37.98% 2,305 59.39% 102 2.63%
1908 1,446 41.95% 1,996 57.91% 5 0.15%
1904 1,301 38.55% 2,063 61.13% 11 0.33%
1900 1,357 37.85% 2,176 60.70% 52 1.45%
1896 2,151 44.20% 2,596 53.34% 120 2.47%
1892 1,470 38.59% 2,154 56.55% 185 4.86%
1888 1,988 42.74% 2,475 53.21% 188 4.04%
1884 1,882 46.65% 2,053 50.89% 99 2.45%
1880 1,766 40.07% 2,504 56.82% 137 3.11%



Education[]

Bedford County School District operates nine elementary schools, four middle schools, and three high schools, in Shelbyville (Shelbyville Central High School), Wartrace (Cascade High School), and Unionville (Community High School).[16]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Bedford County, Tennessee

References[]

  1. ^ Timothy Marsh and Helen C. March, "Bedford County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 31 March 2013.
  2. ^ "Origins of Tennessee County Names". https://sos.tn.gov/sites/default/files/Pgs.%20628-638%20Origins%20of%20County%20names.pdf. 
  3. ^ a b "Bedford County, Tennessee". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/bedfordcountytennessee/PST045219. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  5. ^ "Bedford County History". http://www.bedfordcountytn.org/history.html. 
  6. ^ "Origins of Tennessee County Names". https://sos.tn.gov/sites/default/files/Pgs.%20628-638%20Origins%20of%20County%20names.pdf. 
  7. ^ Brochure "William Whitaker Reed House", 1850, Visitor's Center, Salado, Texas
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_47.txt. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/tn190090.txt. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  13. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  14. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US47003&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  16. ^ "Schools". Bedford County School District. http://www.bedfordk12tn.com/?PN=Schools2. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 35°31′N 86°28′W / 35.51, -86.46


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Bedford County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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