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Blue Earth County, Minnesota
Map of Minnesota highlighting Blue Earth County
Location in the state of Minnesota
Map of the U.S. highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location in the U.S.
Founded March 5, 1853 [1]
Named for Blue Earth River
Seat Mankato
Largest city Mankato
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

765.90 sq mi (1,984 km²)
752.36 sq mi (1,949 km²)
13.54 sq mi (35 km²), 1.77%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

69,112
74/sq mi (29/km²)
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.blue-earth.mn.us

Blue Earth County is a county located in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of 2020, the population was 69,112.[1] Its county seat is Mankato.[2]

Blue Earth County is part of the Mankato–North Mankato Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 765.90 square miles (1,983.7 km2), of which 752.36 square miles (1,948.6 km2) (or 98.23%) is land and 13.54 square miles (35.1 km2) (or 1.77%) is water.[3] The Le Sueur River flows through a part of the county. The land surface is relatively flat with over 30 lakes in the county. In the northeastern part of the county there are many forests that are called big woods. The rivers that flow out of the northeastern part are surrounded by these big woods. Most of the county is grassland prairie but scattered parts of it are wet prairie. Some spots that surround the rivers are oak openings and barren brushland.

Major highways[]

  • US 14.svg U.S. Highway 14
  • US 169 (MN).svg U.S. Highway 169
  • MN-22.svg Minnesota State Highway 22
  • MN-30.svg Minnesota State Highway 30
  • MN-60.svg Minnesota State Highway 60
  • MN-66.svg Minnesota State Highway 66
  • MN-68.svg Minnesota State Highway 68
  • MN-83.svg Minnesota State Highway 83

Lakes[]

  • Crystal Lake in Lake Crystal
  • Albert Lake: in Jamestown Township
  • Alice Lake: in Le Ray Township
  • Armstrong Lake: in Butternut Valley Township
  • Ballantyne Lake: in Jamestown Township
  • Born Lake: in Le Ray Township
  • Cottonwood Lake: in Medo Township
  • Duck Lake: in Jamestown Township
  • Eagle Lake: the southern half of the larger, northern lake is in Mankato Township and the northern half is in Lime Township with the eastern part of it just barely extending into Jamestown Township the eastern half of the smaller, southern lake is in Le Ray Township and the western half is in Mankato Township
  • George Lake: in Jamestown Township
  • Gilfillin Lake: mostly in Jamestown Township, but the extreme southern edge juts into in Le Ray Township
  • Ida Lake: in Shelby Township
  • Indian Lake: is in Le Ray Township
  • Knights Lake: western half is in Mapleton Township and eastern half is in Danville Township
  • Lake Crystal mostly in Judson Township, but the southern third is in Garden City Township
  • Lieberg Lake: in Butternut Valley Township
  • Lily Lake: Judson Township
  • Loon Lake: in Garden City Township
  • Long Lake: in Jamestown Township
  • Lura Lake: mostly in Sterling Township, but the eastern fifth extends into Mapleton Township and a very small part extends into Faribault County
  • Madison Lake: southern three-quarters is in Le Ray Township and the northern quarter is in Jamestown Township
  • Mennenga Lake: Judson Township
  • Mills Lake: in Garden City Township
  • Minnesota Lake: almost entirely in Faribault County, but the extreme northern edge extends into in Danville Township
  • Mud Lake: in Jamestown Township
  • Perch Lake: mostly in Beauford Township, but the eastern fifth of the lake extends into in Medo Township
  • Porter Lake: in Ceresco Township
  • Rice Lake: in McPherson Township
  • Severson Lake: in Medo Township
  • Strom Lake: in Butternut Valley Township
  • Wita Lake: in Lime Township

Adjacent counties[]

History[]

The area of Blue Earth County was once known as the "Big Woods" and was occupied by the Dakota Indians. It was started by a French explorer, Pierre-Charles Le Sueur. He was one of the first White people in this area, arriving at the point where the Minnesota and Blue Earth rivers meet. There, he made an unsuccessful attempt to mine copper from the blue earth found in the area. The area remained under French control until 1803, but soon after was passed to the United States by the Louisiana Purchase. When Minnesota became a territory in 1849, the territorial government became interested in having the river valley for settlement. In 1850 the first steamboat trip, starting in St. Paul, traveled on the Minnesota River and came to the Blue Earth River. The first White settlers, P.K. Johnson and Henry Jackson came off the boat and settled in present day Mankato. The ratification of the Mendota and Traverse des Sioux Treaties in 1851 effectively forced the Dakota to leave the area for nearby reservations.

The county of Blue Earth was finally created after a division of the Minnesota Territory on March 5, 1853 from portions of Dakota County and free territory. It was named after the Blue Earth River. The first government officials were appointed by Alexander Ramsey, who was the territorial governor at that time. That October the first election was held for government officials with a total of 22 ballots being taken.

Unfulfilled treaty promises and starvation on the Indians reservation led to the Dakota War of 1862, which resulted in Dakota defeat and the largest mass execution in US history in Mankato. In 1868 the railroads arrived. They helped with the growth and development of many areas, including Blue Earth. The railroads allowed many different White ethnic immigrants and Yankee settlers into the area. Blue Earth has grown into a very good county for agriculture, industry, business, education, and culture, and still continues to grow today.

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1860 4,803
1870 17,302 260.2%
1880 22,889 32.3%
1890 29,210 27.6%
1900 32,263 10.5%
1910 29,337 −9.1%
1920 31,477 7.3%
1930 33,847 7.5%
1940 36,203 7.0%
1950 38,327 5.9%
1960 44,385 15.8%
1970 52,322 17.9%
1980 52,314 0%
1990 54,044 3.3%
2000 55,941 3.5%
2010 64,013 14.4%
U.S. Decennial Census

Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 U.S. census data.

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 55,941 people, 21,062 households, and 12,616 families residing in the county. The population density was 74 people per square mile (29/km²). There were 21,971 housing units at an average density of 29 per square mile (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.96% White, 1.19% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.79% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 1.03% from two or more races. 1.77% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 47.6% were of German, 13.6% Norwegian and 6.5% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 21,062 households out of which 29.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.60% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.10% were non-families. 27.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county the population was spread out with 21.40% under the age of 18, 22.10% from 18 to 24, 25.60% from 25 to 44, 18.80% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 99.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,940, and the median income for a family was $50,257. Males had a median income of $32,087 versus $22,527 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,712. About 6.10% of families and 12.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.50% of those under age 18 and 9.40% of those age 65 or over.

On ePodunk : Blue Earth County & Blue Earth Cty. ancestry :
German - 41%; Norwegian - 14%; Irish - 9% (2000)

Government and politics[]

As of 2020, Blue Earth County has voted for the winning presidential candidate in 13 of the last 15 elections, the exceptions being 1988 and 2004. Since 1988 it has tilted toward the Democratic Party, but in 2000 and 2016 it voted for the Republican candidates. Despite voting for Trump in 2016, the county voted for Joe Biden in 2020.

United States presidential election results for Blue Earth County, Minnesota[5]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 16,731 46.41% 18,330 50.84% 990 2.75%
2016 15,667 46.64% 14,428 42.95% 3,498 10.41%
2012 14,916 43.52% 18,164 53.00% 1,194 3.48%
2008 14,782 42.15% 19,325 55.10% 963 2.75%
2004 15,737 47.52% 16,865 50.92% 517 1.56%
2000 12,942 47.23% 12,329 44.99% 2,131 7.78%
1996 9,082 35.95% 12,420 49.17% 3,759 14.88%
1992 8,813 31.65% 11,531 41.41% 7,503 26.94%
1988 11,959 48.71% 12,375 50.40% 218 0.89%
1984 14,298 54.27% 11,877 45.08% 172 0.65%
1980 11,966 45.78% 10,930 41.82% 3,242 12.40%
1976 11,998 46.71% 12,930 50.33% 760 2.96%
1972 12,702 53.68% 10,638 44.96% 322 1.36%
1968 9,571 48.99% 9,254 47.37% 712 3.64%
1964 8,009 42.61% 10,687 56.85% 101 0.54%
1960 11,328 58.35% 8,052 41.48% 33 0.17%
1956 11,398 67.50% 5,467 32.38% 21 0.12%
1952 11,867 70.34% 4,952 29.35% 51 0.30%
1948 7,520 50.29% 7,272 48.63% 162 1.08%
1944 9,429 64.67% 5,098 34.96% 54 0.37%
1940 9,642 61.87% 5,880 37.73% 62 0.40%
1936 5,550 37.58% 8,255 55.89% 964 6.53%
1932 5,550 40.54% 7,925 57.88% 216 1.58%
1928 8,120 60.71% 5,177 38.70% 79 0.59%
1924 6,773 55.09% 1,123 9.13% 4,399 35.78%
1920 8,894 79.05% 1,974 17.55% 383 3.40%
1916 2,864 53.96% 2,211 41.65% 233 4.39%
1912 1,344 25.40% 2,025 38.27% 1,922 36.33%
1908 3,297 56.20% 2,191 37.34% 379 6.46%
1904 3,573 67.42% 1,419 26.77% 308 5.81%
1900 3,647 58.68% 2,254 36.27% 314 5.05%
1896 4,055 57.50% 2,744 38.91% 253 3.59%
1892 2,680 46.00% 2,399 41.18% 747 12.82%



County Board of Commissioners[6]
Position Name District Next Election
Commissioner Colleen Landkamer District 1 2022
Commissioner and Chairperson Vance Stuehrenberg District 2 2022
Commissioner Mark Piepho District 3 2020
Commissioner Will Purvis District 4 2020
Commissioner Kip Bruender District 5 2020
State Legislature (2021-2023)
Position Name Affiliation District
  Senate Nick Frentz[7] Democrat District 19
  Senate Julie Rosen[8] Republican District 23
  House of Representatives Susan Akland[9] Republican District 19A
  House of Representatives Luke Frederick[10] Democrat District 19B
  House of Representatives Jeremy Munson[11] Republican District 23B
U.S Congress (2021-2023)
Position Name Affiliation District
  House of Representatives Jim Hagedorn[12] Republican 1st
  Senate Amy Klobuchar[13] Democrat N/A
  Senate Tina Smith[14] Democrat N/A


Cities and towns[]

Blue Earth County Courthouse

Cities Townships
  • Amboy
  • Eagle Lake
  • Good Thunder
  • Lake Crystal
  • Madison Lake
  • Mankato
  • Mapleton
  • Minnesota Lake
  • North Mankato
  • Pemberton
  • Skyline
  • St. Clair
  • Vernon Center
  • Beauford Township
  • Butternut Valley Township
  • Cambria Township
  • Ceresco Township
  • Danville Township
  • Decoria Township
  • Garden City Township
  • Jamestown Township
  • Judson Township
  • Le Ray Township
  • Lime Township
  • Lincoln Township
  • Lyra Township
  • Mankato Township
  • Mapleton Township
  • McPherson Township
  • Medo Township
  • Pleasant Mound Township
  • Rapidan Township
  • Shelby Township
  • South Bend Township
  • Sterling Township
  • Vernon Center Township

† Only a part of the city is in Blue Earth County.

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Blue Earth County, Minnesota

References[]

  1. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_PL_GCTPL2.ST05&prodType=table. Retrieved 25 April 2011. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. http://www.census.gov/tiger/tms/gazetteer/county2k.txt. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  6. ^ "Board of Commissioners | Blue Earth County, MN - Official Website". http://www.co.blue-earth.mn.us/94/Board-of-Commissioners. 
  7. ^ "MN State Senate" (in en). https://www.senate.mn/members/member_bio.php?mem_id=1224. 
  8. ^ "MN State Senate" (in en). https://www.senate.mn/members/member_bio.php?member_id=1053. 
  9. ^ Rinehart, Jake. "Akland wins House District 19A following recount" (in en-US). https://www.keyc.com/2020/12/03/akland-wins-house-district-following-recount/. 
  10. ^ "Rep. Luke Frederick (19B) - Minnesota House of Representatives". https://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/members/profile/15542. 
  11. ^ "Rep. Jeremy Munson (23B) - Minnesota House of Representatives". https://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/members/profile/15496. 
  12. ^ "Representative Jim Hagedorn" (in en). https://hagedorn.house.gov/. 
  13. ^ "U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar". https://www.klobuchar.senate.gov/public/. 
  14. ^ "Home" (in en). https://www.smith.senate.gov/. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 44°02′N 94°04′W / 44.03, -94.06


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Blue Earth County, Minnesota. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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