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Cabell County, West Virginia
Cabell County Courthouse 2020.jpg
Cabell County Courthouse in Huntington
Map of West Virginia highlighting Cabell County
Location in the state of West Virginia
Map of the U.S. highlighting West Virginia
West Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded January 2, 1809
Named for William H. Cabell
Seat Huntington
Largest city Huntington
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

288 sq mi (746 km²)
281 sq mi (728 km²)
7.0 sq mi (18 km²), 2.4%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

94,350
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.cabellcounty.org

Cabell County is located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 94,350,[1] making it West Virginia's fourth-most populous county. Its county seat is Huntington.[2] The county was organized in 1809 and named for William H. Cabell, the Governor of Virginia from 1805 to 1808.[3] Cabell County is part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 288 square miles (750 km2), of which 281 square miles (730 km2) is land and 7.0 square miles (18 km2) (2.4%) is water.[4]

In 1863, West Virginia's counties were divided into civil townships, with the intention of encouraging local government. This proved impractical in the heavily rural state, and in 1872 the townships were converted into magisterial districts.[5] Cabell County was divided into five districts: Barboursville, Grant, Guyandotte, McComas, and Union. Two additional districts, Gideon and Kyle, were established between 1920 and 1930. Between 1980 and 1990, the county was redivided into five districts: District 1, District 2, District 3, District 4, and District 5. The names and boundaries of the historic districts were preserved in the form of tax and assessment districts.[6]

Major highways[]

  • I-64 (WV).svg Interstate 64
  • US 52.svg U.S. Route 52
  • US 60.svg U.S. Route 60
  • WV-2.svg West Virginia Route 2
  • WV-10.svg West Virginia Route 10
  • WV-152.svg West Virginia Route 152
  • WV-527.svg West Virginia Route 527

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 2,717
1820 4,789 76.3%
1830 5,884 22.9%
1840 8,163 38.7%
1850 6,299 −22.8%
1860 8,020 27.3%
1870 6,429 −19.8%
1880 13,744 113.8%
1890 23,595 71.7%
1900 29,252 24.0%
1910 46,685 59.6%
1920 65,746 40.8%
1930 90,786 38.1%
1940 97,459 7.4%
1950 108,035 10.9%
1960 108,202 0.2%
1970 106,918 −1.2%
1980 106,835 −0.1%
1990 96,827 −9.4%
2000 96,784 0%
2010 96,319 −0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790–1960[8] 1900–1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2010–2020[1]

The Cabell County Court House in Huntington, the building that houses most of the county's administrative offices.

2000 census[]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 96,784 people, 41,180 households, and 25,490 families living in the county. The population density was 344 people per square mile (133/km2). There were 45,615 housing units at an average density of 162 per square mile (63/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 93.37% White, 4.29% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.77% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. 0.68% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 41,180 households, out of which 25.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.10% were married couples living together, 11.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.10% were non-families. 31.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 20.00% under the age of 18, 13.50% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 23.60% from 45 to 64, and 16.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 91.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,479, and the median income for a family was $37,691. Males had a median income of $31,780 versus $22,243 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,638. About 13.70% of families and 19.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.60% of those under age 18 and 10.80% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 96,319 people, 41,223 households, and 24,308 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 342.8 inhabitants per square mile (132.4 /km2). There were 46,169 housing units at an average density of 164.3 per square mile (63.4 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 91.6% white, 5.0% black or African American, 1.0% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.3% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.1% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 17.2% were Irish, 16.5% were English, 15.9% were German, and 10.7% were American.[14]

Of the 41,223 households, 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.3% were married couples living together, 12.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 41.0% were non-families, and 33.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.85. The median age was 38.7 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $34,492 and the median income for a family was $48,323. Males had a median income of $39,523 versus $28,952 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,907. About 15.3% of families and 20.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.0% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Communities[]

City[]

Town[]

  • Milton

Village[]

  • Barboursville

Magisterial districts[]

  • District 1
  • District 2
  • District 3
  • District 4
  • District 5

Census-designated places[]

  • Culloden
  • Lesage
  • Pea Ridge
  • Salt Rock

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Brownstown
  • Clover
  • Fudges Creek
  • Hodges
  • Indian Meadows
  • Inez
  • Johnson
  • Melissa
  • Ona
  • Prairietown
  • Reid
  • Roach
  • Sarah
  • Swann
  • Wilson

Politics[]

For most of its history, Cabell County was a swing county, voting for the national winner in every presidential election from 1892 to 2004, aside from 1924 and 1960. However, similar to the rest of West Virginia, it has become a Republican stronghold, with Donald Trump winning the county by a margin of 25 percent over Hillary Clinton in 2016 and by a margin of 18 percent over Joe Biden in 2020.

United States presidential election results for Cabell County, West Virginia[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 21,721 58.14% 14,994 40.13% 645 1.73%
2016 19,850 59.09% 11,447 34.08% 2,294 6.83%
2012 17,985 55.93% 13,568 42.19% 605 1.88%
2008 18,793 54.11% 15,292 44.03% 647 1.86%
2004 21,035 55.43% 16,583 43.70% 332 0.87%
2000 16,440 51.03% 14,896 46.24% 880 2.73%
1996 13,179 40.48% 16,277 49.99% 3,104 9.53%
1992 13,203 39.16% 15,111 44.82% 5,401 16.02%
1988 17,197 52.65% 15,368 47.05% 97 0.30%
1984 21,815 58.26% 15,513 41.43% 117 0.31%
1980 19,482 49.21% 17,732 44.79% 2,374 6.00%
1976 19,644 48.56% 20,811 51.44% 0 0.00%
1972 29,582 67.39% 14,312 32.61% 0 0.00%
1968 19,418 45.05% 19,018 44.12% 4,666 10.83%
1964 16,957 37.36% 28,437 62.64% 0 0.00%
1960 26,988 56.34% 20,911 43.66% 0 0.00%
1956 28,882 61.07% 18,408 38.93% 0 0.00%
1952 27,461 55.32% 22,179 44.68% 0 0.00%
1948 18,599 43.86% 23,680 55.84% 131 0.31%
1944 19,861 46.32% 23,020 53.68% 0 0.00%
1940 21,027 42.78% 28,125 57.22% 0 0.00%
1936 19,003 40.95% 27,319 58.87% 87 0.19%
1932 17,999 42.91% 23,498 56.01% 453 1.08%
1928 21,091 57.65% 15,340 41.93% 152 0.42%
1924 15,581 47.26% 16,211 49.17% 1,177 3.57%
1920 13,170 50.11% 12,845 48.87% 268 1.02%
1916 5,728 46.18% 6,446 51.97% 229 1.85%
1912 1,798 17.49% 4,793 46.62% 3,690 35.89%



Notable people[]

  • James F. Adams, Union Army soldier in the American Civil War, and recipient of the Medal of Honor.
  • Albert G. Jenkins, planter, lawyer, politician, and Confederate general
  • Alberta Gallatin Jenkins, stage and screen actress, daughter of Albert G. Jenkins.
  • Evan Jenkins: State Senator and US Congressman of West Virginia
  • Eli C. D. Shortridge, third Governor of North Dakota from 1893 to 1895; born in Cabell County.[17]
  • Thomas Hannan, revolutionary war soldier, settler of Cabell County.[18][19][20][21]
  • Lelia Ariana Mather, 1844–1936, mother of Henry Mather Greene and Charles Sumner Greene, architects working as "Greene & Greene." designed numerous homes in Pasadena, CA in the early 1900s, including the famous "Gamble House." <milliongraves>

See also[]

  • Beech Fork State Park
  • Green Bottom Wildlife Management Area
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Cabell County, West Virginia

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/54/54011.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Cabell County history sources". http://www.wvculture.org/history/counties/cabell.html. 
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_54.txt. 
  5. ^ Otis K. Rice & Stephen W. Brown, West Virginia: A History, 2nd ed., University Press of Kentucky, Lexington (1993), p. 240.
  6. ^ United States Census Bureau, U.S. Decennial Census, Tables of Minor Civil Divisions in West Virginia, 1870–2010.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/wv190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US54011. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US54011. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US54011. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US54011. 
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  17. ^ "North Dakota Governor Eli C. D. Shortridge". National Governors Association. http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_north_dakota/col2-content/main-content-list/title_shortridge_eli.html. 
  18. ^ Averill, James P. 1882. History of Gallia County. H. H. Hardesty & Co. Publishers: Chicago.Deeds and wills.
  19. ^ Laidley, W.S. 1901. "The West End of West Virginia." The West Virginia Historical Magazine Quarterly 1:5-41. The West Virginia Historical and Antiquarian Society.
  20. ^ Miller, Thomas Condit, and Hu Maxwell. 1913. West Virginia and Its People. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company.
  21. ^ Brant, Fuller, & Co. 1891. History of the Great Kanawha Valley: With Family History and Biographical Sketches. Madison, Wisconsin.

External links[]

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Coordinates: 38°25′N 82°14′W / 38.42, -82.24


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Cabell County, West Virginia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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