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Cache County, Utah
LoganUtahCourthouse.jpg
Cache County Courthouse, July 2009
Map of Utah highlighting Cache County
Location in the state of Utah
Map of the U.S. highlighting Utah
Utah's location in the U.S.
Founded January 5, 1856 (created)
April 4, 1857 (organized)
Named for Fur trade
Seat Logan
Largest city Logan
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

1,173 sq mi (3,038 km²)
1,165 sq mi (3,017 km²)
8.2 sq mi (21 km²), 0.7
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

133,154
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Website www.cachecounty.org

Cache County ( /kæʃ/ KASH) is a county located in the Wasatch Front region of Utah. As of the 2020 United States Census the population was 133,154.[1] Its county seat and largest city is Logan.[2] Cache County is included in Logan metropolitan area.

History[]

Indigenous peoples occupied the valleys of present Cache County as much as 10,000 BCE. Near the present epoch, the valley served the Plains Indians and the Shoshone. Trappers and explorers visited the area in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. John Henry Weber and Jim Bridger came through in 1824; Peter Skene Ogden and James Beckwourth passed through in 1825. In July 1855 a group of Mormon settlers drove a herd of cattle into the valley and camped at Haw Bush Spring (present Elkhorn Ranch). However, the extremely cold winter conditions drove the settlers back to the Salt Lake Valley. That summer (1856) local leaders of the LDS Church sent Peter Maughan to establish a permanent settlement in the Cache Valley. His settlement, Maughan's Fort, grew into the present Wellsville.

More settlers arrived in the valley, and by 1859 the settlements of Providence, Mendon, Logan, Richmond, and Smithfield had been established.

In preparation for this influx, the Utah Territory legislature created a county, effective January 5, 1856, with seat and government incomplete. By April 4, 1857, the organization was completed, and Logan became the seat.[3] It was named for the fur stashes, known in French as Caches, made by many of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company trappers. The county gained area in 1862 when its boundary lines with adjacent counties were adjusted. In 1863, the federal government enacted the Idaho Territory, which administratively removed the described portions of Cache County that lay north of the territorial border. Then in 1864, the east part of the county was partitioned to become Rich County. The borders of Cache County have remained in their present state since 1864.

A rail line between Brigham City and Logan was completed in 1873 (Utah and Northern Railway). The line was extended into Idaho, and a connection was made to the transcontinental railroad, which opened the world to Cache County; their crops (especially grain and dairy) began moving to broader markets. The county's sheep population also burgeoned; from 10,000 in 1880 to 300,000 by 1900. By 1900 the Forest Service began regulating grazing practices, which brought the sheep population under control.

There were 16,000 dairy cows in Cache County in 1910. Commercial creameries, flour mills, woolen mills, and knitting factories developed around the farm-based economy. Cache presently continues as the state's leader in dairy products and as a major producer of hay, alfalfa, and grain.[4]

Geography[]

Cache County lies on the north edge of Utah. Its north border abuts the south border of the state of Idaho. On the western edge of the county are the Wellsville Mountains and on the eastern edge are the Bear River Mountains, both northern branches of the Wasatch Range. The Cache Valley reaches north to the state border. The Bear River Mountains, the northernmost extension of the Wasatch Range, cover the eastern half of the county.[5] The county's highest elevation is Naomi Peak in the NE part of the county, at 9,979' (3042m) ASL.[6] The Bear River flows through Cache Valley. The county has a total area of 1,173 square miles (3,040 km2), of which 1,165 square miles (3,020 km2) is land and 8.2 square miles (21 km2) (0.7%) is water.[7]

Major highways[]

  • U.S. Highway 89
  • U.S. Highway 91
  • State Route 23
  • State Route 30
  • State Route 101
  • State Route 142
  • State Route 165
  • State Route 200
  • State Route 218
  • State Route 252

Adjacent counties[]

Protected areas[]

  • Cache National Forest (part)
  • Caribou National Forest (part)
  • Hardware Ranch Wildlife Management Area (state park)
  • Tony Grove Lake Campground (US Forest Service)
  • Millville Face Wildlife Management Area[5]

Lakes[]

  • Crescent Lake
  • Cutler Reservoir
  • Hyrum Reservoir
  • Newton Reservoir
  • Porcupine Reservoir
  • Tony Grove Lake[5]

Government and politics[]

Cache County is governed by a seven-member county council and also elects eight officials at large. As of 2019, all county elected officials were members of the Republican Party.[8][9]

State Elected Offices
Position District Name Affiliation First Elected
style="background-color:#FF3333;" width=10px | " |  Senate 17 Scott Sandall Republican 2018[10]
style="background-color:#FF3333;" width=10px | " |  Senate 25 Chris D. Wilson Republican 2020[11]
style="background-color:#FF3333;" width=10px | " |  House of Representatives 1 Joel Ferry Republican 2018[12]
style="background-color:#FF3333;" width=10px | " |  House of Representatives 3 Mike Petersen Republican 2020[13]
style="background-color:#FF3333;" width=10px | " |  House of Representatives 4 Dan Johnson Republican 2018[14]
style="background-color:#FF3333;" width=10px | " |  House of Representatives 5 Casey Snider Republican 2018[15]
  Board of Education 1 Jennie Earl Nonpartisan 2018[16]

Like most of Utah, Cache County is strongly Republican in presidential elections. The last time it voted for a Democratic presidential candidate was 1944.

United States presidential election results for Cache County, Utah[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 38,032 65.17% 16,650 28.53% 3,676 6.30%
2016 21,139 45.25% 8,563 18.33% 17,016 36.42%
2012 35,039 82.85% 6,244 14.76% 1,010 2.39%
2008 29,127 69.48% 10,294 24.56% 2,501 5.97%
2004 32,486 81.76% 6,375 16.05% 870 2.19%
2000 25,920 78.21% 5,170 15.60% 2,052 6.19%
1996 16,832 63.77% 6,595 24.99% 2,967 11.24%
1992 15,971 51.98% 4,973 16.19% 9,781 31.83%
1988 21,766 77.84% 5,871 21.00% 326 1.17%
1984 22,127 83.68% 4,123 15.59% 192 0.73%
1980 20,251 78.69% 3,639 14.14% 1,845 7.17%
1976 16,636 71.73% 5,430 23.41% 1,128 4.86%
1972 16,538 76.83% 4,018 18.67% 969 4.50%
1968 11,906 68.81% 4,327 25.01% 1,070 6.18%
1964 9,326 58.46% 6,627 41.54% 0 0.00%
1960 10,281 67.65% 4,917 32.35% 0 0.00%
1956 10,349 73.82% 3,671 26.18% 0 0.00%
1952 10,167 70.56% 4,242 29.44% 0 0.00%
1948 6,514 50.32% 6,383 49.30% 49 0.38%
1944 4,938 41.33% 6,998 58.57% 12 0.10%
1940 5,184 39.70% 7,867 60.25% 7 0.05%
1936 3,258 27.25% 8,606 71.97% 93 0.78%
1932 4,829 42.20% 6,522 56.99% 93 0.81%
1928 5,297 52.60% 4,748 47.15% 26 0.26%
1924 4,973 52.01% 3,915 40.94% 674 7.05%
1920 5,063 53.88% 4,239 45.11% 95 1.01%
1916 3,756 41.09% 5,305 58.03% 81 0.89%
1912 2,825 37.92% 3,296 44.25% 1,328 17.83%
1908 3,787 52.81% 3,317 46.26% 67 0.93%
1904 4,008 56.89% 2,948 41.85% 89 1.26%
1900 2,820 47.59% 3,082 52.02% 23 0.39%
1896 839 16.03% 4,395 83.97% 0 0.00%



Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1890 15,509
1900 18,139 17.0%
1910 23,062 27.1%
1920 26,992 17.0%
1930 27,424 1.6%
1940 29,797 8.7%
1950 33,536 12.5%
1960 35,788 6.7%
1970 42,331 18.3%
1980 57,176 35.1%
1990 70,183 22.7%
2000 91,391 30.2%
2010 112,656 23.3%
US Decennial Census[18]
1790–1960[19] 1900–1990[20]
1990–2000[21] 2010–2020[1]

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 112,655 people, 34,722 households, and 26,464 families in the county. The population density was 96.7/sqmi (37.35/km2). There were 37,024 housing units at an average density of 31.78/sqmi (12.28/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 89.12% White, 0.62% Black or African American, 0.61% Native American, 1.88% Asian, 0.39% Pacific Islander, 5.48% from other races, and 1.90% from two or more races. 9.96% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 34,722 households, out of which 41.34% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 76.22% were married couples living together, 7.73% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.78% were non-families. 16.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.54% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.14 and the average family size was 3.55.

The county population contained 36.3% under the age of 20, 12.59% from 20 to 24, 26.97% from 25 to 44, 16.41% from 45 to 64, and 7.72% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25.5 years. For every 100 females there were 98.84 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.53 males.

2015[]

As of 2015, the largest self reported ancestry groups in Cache County were:

  • 27.9% were of English ancestry
  • 12.1% were of German ancestry
  • 7.3% were of Danish ancestry.
  • 6.1% were of American ancestry
  • 5.2% were of Swedish ancestry
  • 5.0% were of Scottish ancestry
  • 4.5% were of Irish ancestry
  • 3.0% were of Norwegian ancestry
  • 2.6% were of Welsh ancestry
  • 2.1% were of Italian ancestry
  • 2.0% were of Swiss ancestry
  • 2.0% were of Dutch ancestry
  • 1.5% were of French ancestry
  • 0.7% were of Polish ancestry[22]

2016[]

As of 2016, the largest self reported ancestry groups in Cache County were:

  • 28.3% were of English ancestry
  • 11.6% were of German ancestry
  • 7.4% were of Danish ancestry.
  • 5.9% were of American ancestry
  • 5.3% were of Swedish ancestry
  • 5.1% were of Scottish ancestry
  • 4.6% were of Irish ancestry
  • 2.9% were of Norwegian ancestry
  • 2.7% were of Welsh ancestry
  • 2.2% were of Italian ancestry
  • 2.2% were of Swiss ancestry
  • 1.8% were of French ancestry
  • 1.7% were of Dutch ancestry
  • 0.8% were of Polish ancestry[23]

Communities[]

Map of Cache County communities

Cities[]

Towns[]

  • Amalga
  • Clarkston
  • Cornish
  • Newton
  • Paradise
  • Trenton

Townships[]

  • College-Young (merger of the unincorporated communities of College Ward and Young Ward)

Census-designated places[]

  • Avon
  • Benson
  • Cache (aka Cache Junction)
  • Cove
  • Petersboro

Unincorporated communities[]

  • White Horse Village

[5]

Former communities[]

  • La Plata

Education[]

School districts[]

  • Cache County School District
  • Logan City School District

Universities[]

  • Utah State University (public)
  • Bridgerland Technical College (public)

Gallery[]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Cache County, Utah

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/49/49005.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Utah: Individual County Chronologies". Newberry Library. 2008. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/UT_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  4. ^ Cache County. Utah Division of State History (accessed 30 March 2019)
  5. ^ a b c d Cache County UT Google Maps (accessed 30 March 2019)
  6. ^ "Utah County High Points/Cache County. Peakbaggers (accessed 30 March 2019)". https://www.peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=13209. 
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_49.txt. 
  8. ^ Elected Officials - Cache County (accessed 30 March 2019)
  9. ^ County Council - Cache County (accessed 30 March 2019)
  10. ^ "Senator Sandall Utah Senate". https://senate.utah.gov/sen/SANDASD/. 
  11. ^ "Senator Wilson Utah Senate". https://senate.utah.gov/sen/WILSOCH/. 
  12. ^ "Rep. Ferry, Joel" (in en-US). https://house.utah.gov/rep/FERRYJ/. 
  13. ^ "Rep. Petersen, Michael J." (in en-US). https://house.utah.gov/rep/PETERM/. 
  14. ^ "Rep. Johnson, Dan N." (in en-US). https://house.utah.gov/rep/JOHNSDN/. 
  15. ^ "Rep. Snider, Casey" (in en-US). https://house.utah.gov/rep/SNIDEC/. 
  16. ^ "Jennie Earl". https://www.schools.utah.gov/board/members/utah/jennieearl. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  18. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. 
  19. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  20. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ut190090.txt. 
  21. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  22. ^ Bureau, US Census. "American FactFinder - Results". https://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/15_5YR/DP02/0500000US49005. 
  23. ^ Bureau, US Census. "American FactFinder - Results". https://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/16_5YR/DP02/0500000US49005. 

External links[]

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This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Cache County, Utah. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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