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Canadian County, Oklahoma
ElRenoStables.jpg
Canadian County Jail and Stable in El Reno (2014)
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Canadian County
Location in the state of Oklahoma
Map of the U.S. highlighting Oklahoma
Oklahoma's location in the U.S.
Founded March, 1890
Named for Canadian River
Seat El Reno
Largest city Oklahoma City
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

906 sq mi (2,347 km²)
897 sq mi (2,323 km²)
9.0 sq mi (23 km²), 1.0%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

154,405
129/sq mi (50/km²)
Congressional districts 3rd, 4th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website http://www.canadiancounty.org

Canadian County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2020 census, the population was 154,405,[1] making it the fifth most populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is El Reno.[2]

The county is named for the Canadian River, which forms part of its southern border. The river may have been named for early European explorers who were fur traders and trappers from New France, or pre-1763 colonial Canada.

Canadian County is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

In 1859, the United States expelled the Caddo Nation of Louisiana from its Brazos reservation in Texas and relocated it to what would eventually become Canadian County, Oklahoma.[3][4] Showetat, the last hereditary chief of the Caddo, set up his camp here and is considered Canadian County's first permanent resident. (Union City developed near his camp site.)[5]

The federal government relocated the Wichita tribe to this same part of Indian Territory in 1861. By the Treaty of Medicine Lodge, the United States assigned the land west of the Caddo and Wichita to the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes. They were relocated from Colorado in 1869. The Cheyenne-Arapaho Agency (later renamed the Darlington Agency) was established in 1870.

Canadian County was formed in 1889 as County Four of Oklahoma Territory as part of the Oklahoma Organic Act, which created Oklahoma Territory from part of Indian Territory.[5] It was named after the Canadian River, which runs through the county.

This county was settled by European-Americans after the April 22, 1889, land run, which gave away expropriated Native American land.[5] It was expanded by a second land run in 1892. In 1902, after distribution of communal lands among households of the Cheyenne and Arapaho, their 'surplus' lands were opened to European-American settlement.[5] El Reno was chosen as the county seat over competitors Reno City, Frisco, and Canadian City.

The county was the location of the last great battle of the Cheyenne and Arapaho against United States Army forces.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 906 square miles (2,350 km2), of which 897 square miles (2,320 km2) is land and 9.0 square miles (23 km2) (1.0%) is water.[6] The county lies mostly within the Red Bed Plains, a subregion of the Osage Plains physiographic region. Its northwestern corner is in the Gypsum Hills. The county is drained by the North Canadian River and the Canadian River, which both flow through the county from northwest to southeast.[5]

According to a study published by the Oklahoma Geological Survey, the North Canadian River drains about 40 percent of the county, the Canadian River drains about 32 percent, and the Cimarron River drains about 27 percent (mostly in the northeastern part of the county). About 1 percent of the county is drained by Sugar Creek, which empties into the Washita River, itself a tributary of the Red River.[7]

The North Canadian River enters Canadian County near the northwest corner, flows generally southeast towards the middle of the county, then turns southward to leave the county about 8 miles (13 km) north of the southeastern corner. The river length is about 76 miles (122 km). The elevation drops from Template:Convert/feet at the entry to about Template:Convert/feet at the exit. Its named tributaries are Sixmile Creek, Fourmile Creek, Purcell Creek, Shell Creek, and Mustang Creek.[8]

The Canadian River enters the western border of the county about 11 miles (18 km) north of the southwest corner at an elevation of Template:Convert/feet and flows southeast about 16 miles (26 km), where it becomes the southern border of the county. Its course within the county is 45 miles (72 km) long, and the elevation where it leaves the county is Template:Convert/feet. Named tributaries include Dry Creek and Boggy Creek.[9]

The Cimarron River does not flow through the county, but drains part of the northeastern area via its tributaries: Kingfisher, Dead Indian, Uncle John, Cottonwood, Soldier, and Deer creeks. The Washita River flows more than 20 miles (32 km) south of the county, but drains about 5 square miles (13 km2) in the southwest corner of Canadian County.[10]

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1890 7,158
1900 15,981 123.3%
1910 23,501 47.1%
1920 22,288 −5.2%
1930 28,115 26.1%
1940 27,329 −2.8%
1950 25,644 −6.2%
1960 24,727 −3.6%
1970 32,245 30.4%
1980 56,452 75.1%
1990 74,409 31.8%
2000 87,697 17.9%
2010 115,541 31.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
1790-1960[12] 1900-1990[13]
1990-2000[14] 2010-2020[1]

Age pyramid for Canadian County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data[15]

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 87,697 people, 31,484 households, and 24,431 families residing in the county. The population density was 98 people per square mile (38/km2). There were 33,969 housing units at an average density of 38 per square mile (15/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.01% White, 2.16% Black or African American, 4.27% Native American, 2.45% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.35% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. 3.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 31,484 households, out of which 39.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.30% were married couples living together, 9.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.40% were non-families. 19.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 28.00% under the age of 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 30.70% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 9.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $45,439, and the median income for a family was $51,180. Males had a median income of $35,944 versus $24,631 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,691. About 5.80% of families and 7.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.70% of those under age 18 and 7.20% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[]

Voter registration and party enrollment as of January 15, 2019[16]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Template:Party color cell Democratic 18,513 23.48%
Template:Party color cell Republican 47,989 60.86%
Template:Party color cell Others 12,352 15.66%
Total 78,854 100%
United States presidential election results for Canadian County, Oklahoma[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 43,550 70.31% 16,742 27.03% 1,648 2.66%
2016 39,986 72.34% 11,674 21.12% 3,618 6.55%
2012 35,625 77.17% 10,537 22.83% 0 0.00%
2008 36,428 76.12% 11,426 23.88% 0 0.00%
2004 33,297 77.42% 9,712 22.58% 0 0.00%
2000 22,679 72.32% 8,367 26.68% 314 1.00%
1996 18,139 59.40% 8,977 29.40% 3,420 11.20%
1992 16,756 50.70% 7,215 21.83% 9,079 27.47%
1988 17,872 70.00% 7,453 29.19% 205 0.80%
1984 20,929 79.52% 5,245 19.93% 146 0.55%
1980 15,272 72.58% 4,889 23.24% 880 4.18%
1976 9,766 56.32% 7,288 42.03% 285 1.64%
1972 11,400 78.28% 2,751 18.89% 413 2.84%
1968 5,891 49.12% 3,577 29.83% 2,525 21.05%
1964 5,193 47.47% 5,747 52.53% 0 0.00%
1960 5,697 57.37% 4,234 42.63% 0 0.00%
1956 5,702 59.41% 3,896 40.59% 0 0.00%
1952 7,289 63.43% 4,203 36.57% 0 0.00%
1948 3,729 40.11% 5,568 59.89% 0 0.00%
1944 4,674 49.24% 4,800 50.57% 18 0.19%
1940 4,699 45.90% 5,506 53.79% 32 0.31%
1936 3,325 34.97% 6,135 64.52% 48 0.50%
1932 2,549 27.36% 6,767 72.64% 0 0.00%
1928 5,011 63.63% 2,786 35.38% 78 0.99%
1924 3,070 41.50% 3,065 41.44% 1,262 17.06%
1920 3,881 52.14% 3,268 43.90% 295 3.96%
1916 1,590 37.33% 2,200 51.66% 469 11.01%
1912 1,794 42.49% 2,047 48.48% 381 9.02%
1908 1,931 45.77% 2,124 50.34% 164 3.89%



Government and infrastructure[]

The Federal Bureau of Prisons operates the Federal Correctional Institution, El Reno in El Reno, Canadian County.[18]

Economy[]

Agriculture has been a mainstay of the economy since the beginning of non-Indigenous settlement in the late 1800s.

Transportation[]

Major highways[]

  • I-40
  • I-40 Bus.
  • US-81
  • US-270
  • US-281
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OK/link OK|Template:Infobox road/OK/abbrev OK]]

Airports[]

  • Clarence E. Page Municipal Airport is a public use airport located in Canadian County, 15 nautical miles (28 km) west of the central business district of Oklahoma City, which also owns this airport.[19]
  • Sundance Airpark is a public use airport located in Canadian County, 11 nautical miles (20 km) northwest of the central business district of Oklahoma City. This airport is privately owned.[20]
  • El Reno Regional Airport, El Reno, OK

Communities[]

Cities[]

Towns[]

Census-designated place[]

  • Cedar Lake

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Concho
  • Four Counties Corner (formerly Lockridge)
  • Scott (partly in Caddo County)

NRHP sites[]

The following sites in Canadian County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

  • Avant's Cities Service Station, El Reno
  • Bridgeport Hill Service Station, Geary
  • Bridgeport Hill-Hydro Route 66 Segment, Hydro
  • Canadian County Jail, El Reno
  • Carnegie Library, El Reno
  • Czech Hall, Yukon
  • Darlington Agency Site, El Reno
  • El Reno High School, El Reno
  • El Reno Hotel, El Reno
  • El Reno Municipal Swimming Pool Bath House, El Reno
  • Fort Reno, El Reno
  • William I. and Magdalen M. Goff House, El Reno
  • Jackson Conoco Service Station, El Reno
  • Henry Lassen House, El Reno
  • McGranahan Portion of the Chisholm Trail Roadbed, Yukon vicinity
  • Meloy House, Mustang
  • Mennoville Mennonite Church, El Reno
  • Mulvey Mercantile, Yukon
  • Red Cross Canteen, El Reno
  • Richardson Building, Union City
  • Rock Island Depot, El Reno
  • Southern Hotel, El Reno
  • West Point Christian Church, Yukon
  • Yukon Public Library, Yukon

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/40/40017.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Klos, George (April 1994). "'Our People Could Not Distinguish One Tribe from Another': The 1859 Expulsion of the Reserve Indians from Texas". The Southwestern Historical Quarterly 97 (4): 615–16. 
  4. ^ Franks, Kenny Arthur (1997). Oklahoma: The Land and Its People. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 18. ISBN 9780806199443. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Thomas L. Hedglen, "Canadian County," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, 2009. Accessed March 28, 2015.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazettwhen?eer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_40.txt. 
  7. ^ Mogg, et. al., p. 14.
  8. ^ Mogg, et. al., pp. 15-16.
  9. ^ Mogg, et. al., pp. 17-18.
  10. ^ Mogg, et. al., p.18.
  11. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  13. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ok190090.txt. 
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  15. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  16. ^ "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County". January 15, 2019. https://www.ok.gov/elections/documents/20190115%20-%20Registration%20By%20County%20(vr2420).pdf. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  18. ^ "FCI El Reno Contact Information." Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved on October 1, 2010.
  19. ^ FAA Airport Master Record for RCE (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective December 17, 2009.
  20. ^ FAA Airport Master Record for HSD (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective December 17, 2009.

Further reading[]

External links[]

Coordinates: 35°32′N 97°59′W / 35.54, -97.98


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Canadian County, Oklahoma. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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