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For British letters to voters in Clark County in the 2004 Presidential election, see The Guardian
Clark County, Ohio
Springfield-ohio-courthouse.jpg
Clark County courthouse
Seal of Clark County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Clark County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 1, 1818[1]
Named for George Rogers Clark
Seat Springfield
Largest city Springfield
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

403 sq mi (1,044 km²)
397 sq mi (1,028 km²)
5.1 sq mi (13 km²), 1.3%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

136,001
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 8th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.clarkcountyohio.gov

Clark County is a county located in the west central portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 136,001.[2] Its county seat is Springfield.[3] The county was created on March 1, 1818, and was named for General George Rogers Clark,[4] a hero of the American Revolution.

Clark County comprises the Springfield, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Dayton-Springfield-Sidney-OH Combined Statistical Area.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 403 square miles (1,040 km2), of which 397 square miles (1,030 km2) is land and 5.1 square miles (13 km2) (1.3%) is water.[5] It is the third-smallest county in Ohio by total area.

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 9,533
1830 13,114 37.6%
1840 16,882 28.7%
1850 22,178 31.4%
1860 25,300 14.1%
1870 32,070 26.8%
1880 41,948 30.8%
1890 52,277 24.6%
1900 58,939 12.7%
1910 66,435 12.7%
1920 80,728 21.5%
1930 90,936 12.6%
1940 95,647 5.2%
1950 111,661 16.7%
1960 131,440 17.7%
1970 157,115 19.5%
1980 150,236 −4.4%
1990 147,548 −1.8%
2000 144,742 −1.9%
2010 138,333 −4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2020 [10]

2000 census[]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 144,742 people, 56,648 households, and 39,370 families living in the county. The population density was 362 people per square mile (140/km2). There were 61,056 housing units at an average density of 153 per square mile (59/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 88.12% White, 8.95% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. 1.17% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.8% were of German, 21.6% American, 10.4% Irish and 8.7% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 56,648 households, out of which 31.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.60% were married couples living together, 12.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.50% were non-families. 26.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.10% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 14.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,340, and the median income for a family was $48,259. Males had a median income of $37,157 versus $24,688 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,501. About 7.90% of families and 10.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.90% of those under age 18 and 8.20% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 138,333 people, 55,244 households, and 36,906 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 348.0 inhabitants per square mile (134.4 /km2). There were 61,419 housing units at an average density of 154.5 per square mile (59.7 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 86.3% white, 8.8% black or African American, 0.6% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 1.4% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.8% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 25.3% were German, 15.0% were Irish, 13.8% were American, and 10.5% were English.[14]

Of the 55,244 households, 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.2% were non-families, and 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.96. The median age was 40.5 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $44,141 and the median income for a family was $53,678. Males had a median income of $43,209 versus $30,811 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,110. About 11.1% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.5% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Metropolitan Statistical Area[]

The Springfield metropolitan area was first defined in 1950. Then known as the Springfield Standard Metropolitan Area (Springfield SMA), it consisted of a single county – Clark – and had a population of 111,661.[16][17] Following a term change by the Bureau of the Budget (present-day Office of Management and Budget) in 1959, the Springfield SMA became the Springfield Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (Springfield SMSA).[18] By the census of 1960, the population had grown to 131,440, an 18 percent increase over the previous census.[17] Champaign County was added to the Springfield SMSA in 1973. The two-county area had a combined population of 187,606 in 1970.[17]

In 1983, the official name was shortened to the Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area (Springfield MSA).[18] That same year, Dayton and Springfield were grouped together as the Dayton-Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. The new MSA consisted of four counties – Clark, Greene, Miami, and Montgomery.[19] This arrangement remained unchanged until 2003, when the MSA was split with Springfield's newly defined metropolitan area including only Clark County.[20]

Politics[]

Clark County has voted Republican in every presidential election since 2004 with Donald Trump receiving 57% of the vote in 2016, a deviation from the usual tight results in the county. In 2012, Mitt Romney won the county, but by only 523 votes out of 64,301 cast for president.[21]

County Commissioners - Rick Lohnes (R), Melanie Flax Wilt (R) and Lowell McGlothlin (R)

Sheriff - Deb Burchett (R)

Recorder - Nancy Pence (R)

Treasurer - Stephen Metzger (D)

Auditor - John Federer (R)

Prosecuting Attorney - Dan Driscoll (R)

Coroner - Richard Marsh, MD (D)

Judicial

Municipal Court

Clerk of Courts - Guy Ferguson (D)

Judges - Denise Moody (R), Stephen A. Schumaker (R), Thomas Trempe (D)

Common Pleas Court

Clerk of Courts - Melissa Tuttle (R)

General Division - Judges Douglas Rastatter (R) and Richard O'Neil (D)

Domestic Relations - Judge Thomas Capper (R)

Juvenile Court - Judge Joseph Monnin (D)

Probate - Judge Richard Carey (R)

United States presidential election results for Clark County, Ohio[22]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 39,032 60.65% 24,076 37.41% 1,243 1.93%
2016 35,205 56.88% 23,328 37.69% 3,360 5.43%
2012 31,820 49.49% 31,297 48.67% 1,184 1.84%
2008 33,634 50.21% 31,958 47.71% 1,395 2.08%
2004 34,941 50.78% 33,535 48.74% 331 0.48%
2000 27,660 48.06% 27,984 48.62% 1,915 3.33%
1996 22,297 38.57% 27,890 48.25% 7,615 13.17%
1992 24,011 37.79% 26,692 42.01% 12,835 20.20%
1988 32,729 57.92% 23,247 41.14% 527 0.93%
1984 35,831 62.05% 21,154 36.63% 759 1.31%
1980 27,237 50.42% 22,630 41.90% 4,148 7.68%
1976 26,745 48.93% 26,135 47.81% 1,780 3.26%
1972 34,447 61.79% 19,725 35.38% 1,578 2.83%
1968 23,748 43.58% 24,029 44.10% 6,714 12.32%
1964 19,112 35.80% 34,275 64.20% 0 0.00%
1960 30,588 57.67% 22,456 42.33% 0 0.00%
1956 28,767 61.94% 17,680 38.06% 0 0.00%
1952 27,464 56.92% 20,786 43.08% 0 0.00%
1948 18,548 51.64% 17,236 47.99% 133 0.37%
1944 22,207 49.83% 22,362 50.17% 0 0.00%
1940 20,681 44.41% 25,888 55.59% 0 0.00%
1936 15,483 36.40% 26,138 61.44% 919 2.16%
1932 19,028 51.49% 17,314 46.86% 610 1.65%
1928 26,666 71.72% 10,316 27.74% 201 0.54%
1924 20,340 66.44% 8,415 27.49% 1,860 6.08%
1920 19,869 57.52% 14,097 40.81% 574 1.66%
1916 8,715 47.64% 8,848 48.37% 730 3.99%
1912 6,036 36.16% 5,217 31.25% 5,440 32.59%
1908 8,917 52.97% 6,529 38.78% 1,388 8.25%
1904 9,355 62.02% 4,565 30.26% 1,164 7.72%
1900 8,806 57.33% 6,243 40.64% 312 2.03%
1896 7,667 53.89% 6,382 44.86% 179 1.26%
1892 6,214 50.10% 5,255 42.37% 933 7.52%
1888 7,128 51.79% 5,860 42.58% 774 5.62%
1884 7,517 57.25% 5,204 39.64% 408 3.11%
1880 6,229 58.95% 4,179 39.55% 158 1.50%
1876 5,136 58.90% 3,536 40.55% 48 0.55%
1872 4,095 60.80% 2,612 38.78% 28 0.42%
1868 3,928 64.12% 2,198 35.88% 0 0.00%
1864 3,720 68.61% 1,702 31.39% 0 0.00%
1860 3,017 60.15% 1,730 34.49% 269 5.36%
1856 2,641 60.74% 1,539 35.40% 168 3.86%



Education[]

Public school districts[]

Colleges and Universities[]

Communities[]

Map of Clark County, Ohio with Municipal and Township Labels

Cities[]

Villages[]

  • Catawba
  • Clifton
  • Donnelsville
  • Enon
  • North Hampton
  • South Charleston
  • South Vienna
  • Tremont City

Townships[]

  • Bethel
  • German
  • Green
  • Harmony
  • Mad River
  • Madison
  • Moorefield
  • Pike
  • Pleasant
  • Springfield

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated places[]

  • Crystal Lakes
  • Green Meadows
  • Holiday Valley
  • Northridge
  • Park Layne

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Beatty
  • Brighton
  • Cortsville
  • Dialton
  • Dodo
  • Dolly Varden
  • Durbin
  • Eagle City
  • Harmony
  • Hustead
  • Lawrenceville
  • Limestone City
  • Lisbon
  • Locustgrove
  • Medway
  • New Moorefield
  • Pitchin
  • Plattsburgh
  • Selma
  • Sugar Grove
  • Villa

See also[]

  • Clark County Public Library
  • Clark County Heritage Center
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Clark County, Ohio

References[]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Clark County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Clark.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 82. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_9V1IAAAAMAAJ. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  10. ^ 2020 census
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39023. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39023. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39023. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39023. 
  16. ^ "Standard Metropolitan Areas (SMAs) and Components" (TXT). Standard Metropolitan Areas defined by the Bureau of the Budget, October 13, 1950. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2000-12-14. https://www.census.gov/population/www/metroareas/lists/historical/50mfips.txt. 
  17. ^ a b c "Ohio - Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 1995-03-27. https://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/cencounts/files/oh190090.txt. 
  18. ^ a b "About Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. https://www.census.gov/population/www/metroareas/aboutmetro.html. 
  19. ^ "Metropolitan Areas and Components, 1983" (TXT). Metropolitan Areas defined by Office of Management and Budget, June 27, 1983. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2001-03-01. https://www.census.gov/population/www/metroareas/lists/historical/83mfips.txt. 
  20. ^ "Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Components, 2003" (TXT). Metropolitan statistical areas defined by Office of Management and Budget, June 6, 2003. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2003-07-10. https://www.census.gov/population/www/metroareas/lists/2003/03msa.txt. 
  21. ^ Fugleberg, Jeremy (October 17, 2016). "Reviving Rust Belt city in Ohio not convinced by Donald Trump's message". USA Today. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/elections/2016/10/17/clark-county-springfield-ohio-trump-clinton/91849228/. 
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 39°55′N 83°47′W / 39.92, -83.78

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