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Conecuh County, Alabama
Conecuh County Government Center May 2013 2.jpg
The Conecuh County Government Center in Evergreen
Map of Alabama highlighting Conecuh County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the U.S. highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded February 13, 1818
Seat Evergreen
Largest city Evergreen
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

853 sq mi (2,209 km²)
850 sq mi (2,201 km²)
2.6 sq mi (7 km²), 0.3
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

11,597
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Footnotes: *County Number 21 on Alabama Licence Plates

Conecuh County ( /kəˈnɛkə/) is a county located in the south central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census the population was 11,597.[1] Its county seat is Evergreen.[2] Its name is believed to be derived from a Creek Indian term meaning "land of cane."

History[]

The areas along the rivers had been used by varying cultures of indigenous peoples for thousands of years. French and Spanish explorers encountered the historic Creek Indians. Later, British colonial traders developed relationships with the Creek, and several married high-status Creek women. As the tribe has a matrilineal system, children are considered born into their mother's clan and take their status from her family.

During the American Revolutionary War, the Upper Creek chief Alexander McGillivray, whose father was Scottish, allied his tribe with the British, hoping they could stop colonial Americans from encroaching on Creek land. Commissioned a British colonel, McGillivray named Jean-Antoine Le Clerc, a French adventurer who lived with the Creeks for 20 years, as the war chief to lead the Creek warriors.

Conecuh County was established by Alabama on February 13, 1818. Some of its territory was taken in 1868 by the Republican state legislature during the Reconstruction era to establish Escambia County. Located in the coastal plain, 19th century Conecuh County was an area of plantations and cotton cultivation, and it is still quite rural today. Thousands of African American residents left in the 1940s, during the Second Great Migration, mostly for industrial regions in the major cities.

In September 1979, the county was declared a disaster area, due to damage caused by Hurricane Frederic.

Conecuh County was mentioned as the birthplace of Theodore Bagwell in the television series Prison Break.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 853 square miles (2,210 km2), of which 850 square miles (2,200 km2) is land and 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2) (0.3%) is water.[3]

Major highways[]

  • I-65 (AL).svg Interstate 65
  • US 31.svg U.S. Highway 31
  • US 84.svg U.S. Highway 84
  • Alabama 41.svg State Route 41
  • Alabama 83.svg State Route 83

Adjacent counties[]

Sausage[]

Known as "The Sausage of the South", Conecuh County is also known as the birthplace of Conecuh Sausage. In the days before most had their own freezers, a man named Henry Sessions formulated his recipe for hickory smoked pork sausage. After returning from World War II, Sessions worked as a salesman for a meatpacking plant in Montgomery Alabama. He started Sessions Quick Freeze in Evergreen in 1947 so that people could bring their pigs and cattle, have them slaughtered, and store them and their vegetables in his rentable meat locker. But it was Sessions’ high quality smoked pork sausage that put his company on the map. Customer demand for the sausage made the family butcher 250 hogs a week to satisfy these cravings. Today the 100 employee company makes 35,000- 40,000 pounds of sausage a week.[4]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 5,713
1830 7,444 30.3%
1840 8,197 10.1%
1850 9,322 13.7%
1860 11,311 21.3%
1870 9,574 −15.4%
1880 12,605 31.7%
1890 14,594 15.8%
1900 17,514 20.0%
1910 21,433 22.4%
1920 24,593 14.7%
1930 25,429 3.4%
1940 25,489 0.2%
1950 21,776 −14.6%
1960 17,762 −18.4%
1970 15,645 −11.9%
1980 15,884 1.5%
1990 14,054 −11.5%
2000 14,089 0.2%
2010 13,228 −6.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790–1960[6] 1900–1990[7]
1990–2000[8] 2010–2020[1]

2020[]

Conecuh County Racial Composition[9]
Race Num. Perc.
White 5,835 50.31%
Black or African American 5,096 43.94%
Native American 71 0.61%
Asian 33 0.28%
Other/Mixed 306 2.64%
Hispanic or Latino 256 2.21%

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 11,597 people, 4,553 households, and 2,997 families residing in the county.

2010[]

According to the 2010 U.S. Census:

2000[]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 14,089 people, 5,792 households, and 3,938 families residing in the county. The population density was 17 people per square mile (6/km2). There were 7,265 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 55.40% White, 43.55% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.09% from other races, and 0.60% from two or more races. 0.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,792 households, out of which 30.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.70% were married couples living together, 16.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.00% were non-families. 30.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.90% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 25.80% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 15.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,111, and the median income for a family was $31,424. Males had a median income of $28,115 versus $19,350 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,964. About 21.70% of families and 26.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.10% of those under age 18 and 28.90% of those age 65 or over.


Government[]

Conecuh County is a swing county in presidential elections; since 1972, it has voted for both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party an equal number of times.

United States presidential election results for Conecuh County, Alabama[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,442 53.44% 2,966 46.05% 33 0.51%
2016 3,420 51.94% 3,080 46.77% 85 1.29%
2012 3,439 48.95% 3,555 50.60% 31 0.44%
2008 3,470 49.98% 3,429 49.39% 44 0.63%
2004 3,271 54.33% 2,719 45.16% 31 0.51%
2000 2,699 48.62% 2,783 50.14% 69 1.24%
1996 2,093 38.33% 2,903 53.16% 465 8.51%
1992 2,463 39.05% 3,155 50.02% 689 10.92%
1988 3,256 51.22% 3,022 47.54% 79 1.24%
1984 3,538 55.86% 2,735 43.18% 61 0.96%
1980 2,948 47.69% 3,102 50.19% 131 2.12%
1976 1,812 36.39% 3,086 61.97% 82 1.65%
1972 3,214 74.81% 1,042 24.26% 40 0.93%
1968 186 3.48% 1,151 21.53% 4,009 74.99%
1964 2,782 81.32% 0 0.00% 639 18.68%
1960 650 25.84% 1,815 72.17% 50 1.99%
1956 885 32.14% 1,687 61.26% 182 6.61%
1952 749 30.47% 1,678 68.27% 31 1.26%
1948 64 4.54% 0 0.00% 1,345 95.46%
1944 127 7.74% 1,498 91.34% 15 0.91%
1940 50 2.08% 2,345 97.71% 5 0.21%
1936 89 3.88% 2,195 95.60% 12 0.52%
1932 114 5.09% 2,125 94.91% 0 0.00%
1928 1,113 56.47% 858 43.53% 0 0.00%
1924 92 8.49% 955 88.10% 37 3.41%
1920 189 12.57% 1,315 87.43% 0 0.00%
1916 42 3.83% 1,036 94.44% 19 1.73%
1912 60 6.05% 802 80.93% 129 13.02%
1908 111 13.94% 651 81.78% 34 4.27%
1904 106 12.25% 739 85.43% 20 2.31%
1900 803 48.17% 718 43.07% 146 8.76%
1896 881 43.87% 931 46.36% 196 9.76%
1892 0 0.00% 877 35.01% 1,628 64.99%
1888 748 35.70% 1,347 64.30% 0 0.00%



Communities[]

City[]

  • Evergreen (county seat)

Towns[]

  • Castleberry
  • McKenzie (partly in Butler County)
  • Repton

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Belleville
  • Bermuda
  • Brooklyn
  • Centerville
  • Cohassett
  • Johnsonville
  • Lenox
  • Loree
  • Lyeffion
  • Mixonville
  • Nymph
  • Paul
  • Rabb
  • Range
  • Shreve
  • Skinnerton
  • Spring Hill

Historic sites[]

Conecuh County has three sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Asa Johnston Farmhouse, Louisville and Nashville Depot, and New Evergreen Commercial Historic District.[12]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Conecuh County, Alabama
  • Properties on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in Conecuh County, Alabama

References[]

  1. ^ a b "QuickFacts: Conecuh County, Alabama; Population, Census, 2020 & 2010". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/conecuhcountyalabama/POP010220. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_01.txt. 
  4. ^ Woeller, Dan. "The Food Etymologist". https://dannwoellertthefoodetymologist.wordpress.com/2016/09/27/conecuh-the-sausage-of-the-south/#:~:text=Conecuh%20is%20a%20county%20in,meatpacking%20plant%20in%20Montgomery%20Alabama.. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/al190090.txt. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  9. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US01035&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  11. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/. 
  12. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010. http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov/natreg/docs/All_Data.html. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 31°25′32″N 86°59′38″W / 31.42556, -86.99389


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Conecuh County, Alabama. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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