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Coshocton County, Ohio
Coshocton County Courthouse rear.jpg
Coshocton County Courthouse
Seal of Coshocton County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Coshocton County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded April 1, 1811
Named for "union of waters" or "black bear crossing" in Delaware (Lenape) language
Seat Coshocton
Largest city Coshocton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

567 sq mi (1,469 km²)
564 sq mi (1,461 km²)
3.6 sq mi (9 km²), 0.6%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

36,612
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 7th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.coshoctoncounty.net/

Coshocton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 36,612.[1] Its county seat is Coshocton.[2] The county lies within the Appalachian region of the state. The county was formed on January 31, 1810 from portions of Muskingum and Tuscarawas Counties and later organized in 1811.[3] Its name comes from the Delaware Indian language and has been translated as "union of waters" or "black bear crossing".[4]

The Coshocton, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Coshocton County.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 567 square miles (1,470 km2), of which 564 square miles (1,460 km2) is land and 3.6 square miles (9.3 km2) (0.6%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 7,086
1830 11,161 57.5%
1840 21,590 93.4%
1850 25,674 18.9%
1860 25,032 −2.5%
1870 23,600 −5.7%
1880 26,642 12.9%
1890 26,703 0.2%
1900 29,337 9.9%
1910 30,121 2.7%
1920 29,595 −1.7%
1930 28,976 −2.1%
1940 30,594 5.6%
1950 31,141 1.8%
1960 32,224 3.5%
1970 33,486 3.9%
1980 36,024 7.6%
1990 35,427 −1.7%
2000 36,655 3.5%
2010 36,901 0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2020 [10]

2000 census[]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 36,655 people, 14,356 households, and 10,164 families living in the county. The population density was 65 people per square mile (25/km2). There were 16,107 housing units at an average density of 29 per square mile (11/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.35% White, 1.09% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. 0.59% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 29.4% were of German, 23.4% American, 11.6% English and 9.3% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 93.9% spoke English, 2.4% German, 1.5% Pennsylvania Dutch, and 0.9% Dutch as their first language.[12]

There were 14,356 households, out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.20% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.20% under the age of 18, 7.80% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,701, and the median income for a family was $41,676. Males had a median income of $31,095 versus $21,276 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,364. About 7.00% of families and 9.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.40% of those under age 18 and 9.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 36,901 people, 14,658 households, and 10,089 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 65.4 inhabitants per square mile (25.3 /km2). There were 16,545 housing units at an average density of 29.3 per square mile (11.3 /km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 97.0% white, 1.1% black or African American, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.8% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 29.5% were German, 14.2% were Irish, 11.2% were English, and 10.3% were American.[15]

Of the 14,658 households, 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.2% were non-families, and 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.98. The median age was 40.8 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,469 and the median income for a family was $47,931. Males had a median income of $39,701 versus $26,706 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,635. About 12.4% of families and 17.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.0% of those under age 18 and 8.3% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Politics[]

Prior to 1912, Coshocton County was Democratic in presidential elections, only voting Republican twice from 1856 to 1908. The county was a bellwether from 1912 to 1936. But starting with the 1940 election it has become a Republican stronghold county with Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and Bill Clinton in 1992 being the two lone Democrats to win the county since then.

United States presidential election results for Coshocton County, Ohio[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 12,325 73.50% 4,125 24.60% 318 1.90%
2016 10,785 68.87% 4,013 25.63% 861 5.50%
2012 8,390 53.16% 6,940 43.97% 454 2.88%
2008 8,675 51.22% 7,689 45.39% 574 3.39%
2004 9,839 56.86% 7,378 42.64% 86 0.50%
2000 8,243 57.77% 5,594 39.21% 431 3.02%
1996 6,018 42.00% 6,005 41.91% 2,307 16.10%
1992 5,705 35.27% 6,212 38.41% 4,256 26.32%
1988 8,282 57.09% 6,020 41.50% 204 1.41%
1984 9,842 68.71% 4,392 30.66% 89 0.62%
1980 8,359 60.33% 4,725 34.10% 772 5.57%
1976 6,361 50.90% 5,827 46.63% 308 2.46%
1972 8,082 66.21% 3,790 31.05% 334 2.74%
1968 7,256 53.59% 5,013 37.03% 1,270 9.38%
1964 5,965 41.58% 8,382 58.42% 0 0.00%
1960 9,913 64.75% 5,396 35.25% 0 0.00%
1956 9,549 66.60% 4,789 33.40% 0 0.00%
1952 9,832 62.90% 5,799 37.10% 0 0.00%
1948 7,096 52.05% 6,457 47.36% 81 0.59%
1944 7,917 56.38% 6,126 43.62% 0 0.00%
1940 8,623 52.22% 7,889 47.78% 0 0.00%
1936 6,449 40.65% 9,316 58.72% 101 0.64%
1932 6,040 41.50% 8,188 56.26% 327 2.25%
1928 9,154 70.58% 3,745 28.87% 71 0.55%
1924 5,837 49.77% 4,415 37.64% 1,477 12.59%
1920 6,154 51.07% 5,617 46.61% 280 2.32%
1916 2,831 37.53% 4,269 56.60% 443 5.87%
1912 1,984 27.35% 3,465 47.77% 1,805 24.88%
1908 3,606 44.46% 4,106 50.62% 399 4.92%
1904 3,715 49.45% 3,545 47.18% 253 3.37%
1900 3,592 46.67% 3,940 51.20% 164 2.13%
1896 3,340 45.23% 3,979 53.89% 65 0.88%
1892 2,705 41.60% 3,529 54.27% 269 4.14%
1888 2,768 42.21% 3,567 54.39% 223 3.40%
1884 2,839 44.69% 3,469 54.60% 45 0.71%
1880 2,831 44.99% 3,440 54.67% 21 0.33%
1876 2,518 43.16% 3,312 56.77% 4 0.07%
1872 2,252 45.68% 2,656 53.87% 22 0.45%
1868 2,176 45.35% 2,622 54.65% 0 0.00%
1864 2,122 46.40% 2,451 53.60% 0 0.00%
1860 2,299 47.83% 2,288 47.60% 220 4.58%
1856 2,162 48.06% 2,281 50.70% 56 1.24%



Government[]

The county courts meet in the courthouse located in Coshocton. Built in 1875, it is still in use today.

Communities[]

Map of Coshocton County, Ohio with Municipal and Township Labels

City[]

Villages[]

  • Conesville
  • Nellie
  • Plainfield
  • Warsaw
  • West Lafayette

Townships[]

  • Adams
  • Bedford
  • Bethlehem
  • Clark
  • Crawford
  • Franklin
  • Jackson
  • Jefferson
  • Keene
  • Lafayette
  • Linton
  • Mill Creek
  • Monroe
  • Newcastle
  • Oxford
  • Perry
  • Pike
  • Tiverton
  • Tuscarawas
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • White Eyes

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated places[]

  • Canal Lewisville
  • Fresno

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Bacon
  • Bakersville
  • Blissfield
  • Chili
  • Hardscrabble
  • Keene
  • Layland
  • New Bedford
  • New Guilford
  • New Moscow
  • Newcastle
  • Spring Mountain
  • Tunnel Hill
  • Wakatomika
  • Walhonding
  • West Bedford
  • West Carlisle

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Coshocton County, Ohio

References[]

  1. ^ 2020 census
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Ohio: Individual County Chronologies". Ohio Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/OH_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  4. ^ "Coshocton County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39031&sid=0. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  10. ^ 2020 census
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  12. ^ results Script error: No such module "webarchive". (reference does not show any data)
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39031. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39031. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39031. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39031. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

Further reading[]

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links[]

Coordinates: 40°18′N 81°55′W / 40.30, -81.92

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