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Coweta County, Georgia
Coweta County Courthouse.jpg
Historic Coweta County Courthouse in Newnan
Map of Georgia highlighting Coweta County
Location in the state of Georgia (U.S. state)
Map of the U.S. highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1826; 195 years ago (1826)
Seat Newnan
Largest city Newnan
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

446 sq mi (1,155 km²)
441 sq mi (1,142 km²)
4.9 sq mi (13 km²), 1.1%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

146,158
327/sq mi (126/km²)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4

Coweta County is a county located in the west central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. It is part of Metro Atlanta. As of the 2020 census, the population was 146,158.[1] The county seat is Newnan.[2]

Coweta County is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

The land for Lee, Muscogee, Troup, Coweta and Carroll counties was ceded by the Creek people in the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs. The counties' boundaries were created by the Georgia General Assembly on June 9, 1826, but they were not named until December 14, 1826. Coweta County was named for the Koweta Indians (a sub-group of the Creek people), who had several towns in and around the present-day county.[3]

In the city of Newnan, on April 23, 1899, a notorious lynching occurred after an African-American man by the name of Sam Hose (born Tom Wilkes) was accused of killing his boss, Alfred Cranford. Hose was tortured and burned alive by a lynch mob of approximately 2,000 citizens of Coweta County.

On August 9, 1882, Aleck Brown was lynched.[4]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 446 square miles (1,160 km2), of which 441 square miles (1,140 km2) is land and 4.9 square miles (13 km2) (1.1%) is water.[5] The county is located in the Piedmont region of the state.

The eastern half of Coweta County, from Palmetto southwest to Newnan, then south to Luthersville, is in the Upper Flint River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin). The western half is in the Middle Chattahoochee River-Lake Harding sub-basin of the same ACF River Basin.[6]

Major highways[]

  • I-85.svg Interstate 85
  • Alt plate.svg
    US 27.svg U.S. Route 27 Alternate
  • US 29.svg U.S. Route 29
  • Georgia 14.svg State Route 14
  • Georgia 16.svg State Route 16
  • Georgia 34.svg State Route 34
  • Georgia 34 Bypass.svg State Route 34 Bypass
  • Georgia 41.svg State Route 41
  • Georgia 54.svg State Route 54
  • Georgia 70.svg State Route 70
  • Georgia 74.svg State Route 74
  • Georgia 85.svg State Route 85
  • Georgia 154.svg State Route 154
  • Georgia 403.svg State Route 403

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1830 5,003
1840 10,364 107.2%
1850 13,635 31.6%
1860 14,703 7.8%
1870 15,875 8.0%
1880 21,109 33.0%
1890 22,354 5.9%
1900 24,980 11.7%
1910 28,800 15.3%
1920 29,047 0.9%
1930 25,127 −13.5%
1940 26,972 7.3%
1950 27,786 3.0%
1960 28,893 4.0%
1970 32,310 11.8%
1980 39,268 21.5%
1990 53,853 37.1%
2000 89,215 65.7%
2010 127,317 42.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790–1960[8] 1900–1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census[]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 89,215 people, 31,442 households, and 24,713 families living in the county. The population density was 202 people per square mile (78/km2). There were 33,182 housing units at an average density of 75 per square mile (29/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.86% White, 17.97% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.68% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.22% from other races, and 1.02% from two or more races. 3.14% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 31,442 households, out of which 39.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.50% were married couples living together, 12.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.40% were non-families. Of all households 17.60% were made up of individuals, and 5.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 28.70% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 33.40% from 25 to 44, 21.80% from 45 to 64, and 8.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $52,706, and the median income for a family was $58,750. Males had a median income of $41,369 versus $27,322 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,949. About 6.10% of families and 7.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.60% of those under age 18 and 10.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 127,317 people, 45,673 households, and 34,737 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 288.8 inhabitants per square mile (111.5 /km2). There were 50,171 housing units at an average density of 113.8 per square mile (43.9 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 76.8% white, 18.4% black or African American, 2.2% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 2.9% from other races, and 2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 6.8% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 22.2% were Various European, 10.4% were German, 10.4% were Irish, and 9.9% were English.[14]

Of the 45,673 households, 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.5% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 23.9% were non-families, and 19.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.18. The median age was 36.6 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $61,550 and the median income for a family was $68,469. Males had a median income of $51,658 versus $36,535 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,161. About 7.7% of families and 10.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.4% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.[15]

2020 census[]

Coweta County racial composition[16]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 99,421 68.02%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 25,544 17.48%
Native American 298 0.2%
Asian 3,329 2.28%
Pacific Islander 62 0.04%
Other/Mixed 6,451 4.41%
Hispanic or Latino 11,053 7.56%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 146,158 people, 53,640 households, and 37,400 families residing in the county.

Education[]

The Coweta County School System holds pre-school to grade 12, and consists of nineteen elementary schools, six middle schools and three high schools.[17] The system has 1,164 full-time teachers and more than 18,389 students.[18] Private schools in the county include The Heritage School and Trinity Christian School.

Mercer University has a Regional Academic Center in Newnan. The center, opened in 2010, offers programs through the university's College of Continuing and Professional Studies. The University of West Georgia has a campus near downtown Newnan on the site of the old Newnan Hospital. This campus offers two undergraduate programs - bachelor of science in nursing and early childhood education.[19]

Newnan is also home to a campus of West Georgia Technical College.[20]

Notable people[]

  • Ellis Gibbs Arnall, governor of Georgia, 1943-1947
  • William Yates Atkinson, governor of Georgia, 1894-1896; founded Georgia State College for Women, now Georgia College & State University
  • Steve Bedrosian, former Major League baseball player; National League Cy Young Award winner in 1987
  • Eric Berry, plays football for Kansas City Chiefs
  • Keith Brooking, football player for the Atlanta Falcons and Dallas Cowboys
  • Erskine Caldwell, author of the novels Tobacco Road and God's Little Acre
  • Lewis Grizzard, newspaper columnist, author and humorist
  • Drew Hill, played for the pro football Houston Oilers, Los Angeles Rams and Atlanta Falcons
  • Sam Hose, African-American man who was brutally murdered by a lynch mob after accusations of murder, assault and rape
  • Alan Jackson, country music singer and musician
  • Joe M. Jackson, colonel, U.S. Air Force, Medal of Honor recipient
  • Warren Newson, played pro baseball for the Chicago White Sox
  • Stephen W. Pless, major, U.S. Marine Corps, Medal of Honor recipient
  • Jefferson Randolph "Soapy" Smith, confidence man and crime boss
  • Charles Wadsworth, retired director of the Chamber Music Society at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
  • Jerome Walton, former Major League baseball player; Rookie of the Year in the National League in 1989
  • Rutledge Wood, auto racing analyst and host of Top Gear

Communities[]

Cities[]

Towns[]

  • Haralson
  • Moreland
  • Sharpsburg
  • Turin

Census-designated place[]

  • East Newnan

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Corinth (partly in Heard County)
  • Raymond
  • Roscoe
  • Sargent
  • Thomas Crossroads

Planned town[]

In the federal government's National Urban Policy and New Community Development Act of 1970, funding was provided for thirteen "new towns" or planned cities throughout the country. One 70,000 acre location was set to be developed in Coweta County and was known as Shenandoah.[21] The project was launched in the early 1970s and was foreclosed on in 1981, when it included 170 families and 108 residential lots.[22]

Government[]

The legislative body of Coweta is the Coweta County Commission, which consists of five members elected from numbered districts. The chairmanship rotates among the members. Coweta County is the only county in Georgia that operates with a rotating chairmanship.

District Commissioner Party Term of office Seat up
District 1 Paul Poole (2019 Chairman) Republican 2005–present 2020
District 2 Tim Lassetter Republican 2007–present 2022
District 3 Bob Blackburn Republican 2011–present 2022
District 4 Rodney Brooks (2019 Vice Chairman) Republican 2009–present 2020
District 5 Al Smith Democratic 2009–present 2020

In the General Assembly, it is currently divided between State House district 70, 71, 72 and 132, and is within State Senate district 28 (currently held by Matt Brass). In Congress, it is in the 3rd congressional district, currently represented by Drew Ferguson.

Politics[]

Coweta is a strongly Republican county, voting 68.4 percent for Donald Trump in 2016 and 69.9 percent for Brian Kemp in 2018.

United States presidential election results for Coweta County, Georgia[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 51,501 67.02% 24,210 31.50% 1,134 1.48%
2016 42,533 68.37% 16,583 26.66% 3,094 4.97%
2012 39,653 71.17% 15,168 27.22% 897 1.61%
2008 37,571 70.05% 15,521 28.94% 543 1.01%
2004 31,682 74.36% 10,647 24.99% 280 0.66%
2000 21,327 68.30% 9,056 29.00% 843 2.70%
1996 13,058 56.85% 7,794 33.93% 2,118 9.22%
1992 9,814 47.75% 7,093 34.51% 3,646 17.74%
1988 9,668 69.41% 4,212 30.24% 49 0.35%
1984 7,981 68.62% 3,650 31.38% 0 0.00%
1980 4,480 42.99% 5,697 54.66% 245 2.35%
1976 3,044 32.95% 6,195 67.05% 0 0.00%
1972 5,751 78.66% 1,560 21.34% 0 0.00%
1968 2,442 32.84% 1,204 16.19% 3,791 50.97%
1964 3,656 49.62% 3,712 50.38% 0 0.00%
1960 1,159 23.12% 3,855 76.88% 0 0.00%
1956 850 22.06% 3,003 77.94% 0 0.00%
1952 652 14.52% 3,837 85.48% 0 0.00%
1948 219 8.27% 2,214 83.58% 216 8.15%
1944 130 4.68% 2,649 95.32% 0 0.00%
1940 103 3.48% 2,846 96.25% 8 0.27%
1936 73 3.13% 2,260 96.75% 3 0.13%
1932 46 2.06% 2,183 97.67% 6 0.27%
1928 229 12.15% 1,656 87.85% 0 0.00%
1924 67 6.00% 1,010 90.42% 40 3.58%
1920 169 13.38% 1,094 86.62% 0 0.00%
1916 26 2.02% 1,179 91.40% 85 6.59%
1912 46 4.09% 1,044 92.80% 35 3.11%
1908 220 17.30% 1,032 81.13% 20 1.57%
1904 160 12.46% 1,070 83.33% 54 4.21%
1900 232 17.82% 1,063 81.64% 7 0.54%
1896 571 31.86% 1,196 66.74% 25 1.40%
1892 1,085 34.50% 2,005 63.75% 55 1.75%
1888 990 40.05% 1,476 59.71% 6 0.24%
1884 1,326 47.10% 1,489 52.90% 0 0.00%
1880 1,285 48.20% 1,381 51.80% 0 0.00%



See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Coweta County, Georgia
  • B. T. Brown Reservoir
  • Murder in Coweta County

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/13/13077.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins. Macon, GA: Winship Press. pp. 52. ISBN 0-915430-00-2. http://www.kenkrakow.com/gpn/c.pdf. 
  4. ^ "CSDE Lynching Database" (in en). http://lynching.csde.washington.edu/#/search/GA1882080901. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. https://www.census.gov/geographies/reference-files/time-series/geo/gazetteer-files.html. 
  6. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. http://www.gaswcc.org/maps/. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ga190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US13077. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US13077. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US13077. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US13077. 
  16. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US13077&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  17. ^ Georgia Board of Education, Retrieved August 2, 2014.
  18. ^ School Stats, Retrieved August 2, 2014.
  19. ^ Georgia, University of West. "UWG | University of West Georgia Newnan" (in en). http://www.westga.edu/newnan/. 
  20. ^ "Archived copy". http://www.westgatech.edu/locations/coweta.htm. >.
  21. ^ "History of New Communities Program". U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. http://mars.gmu.edu/bitstream/handle/1920/1775/484_18_03.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y. 
  22. ^ "Shenandoah was origin of new community zoning". Newnan Times Herald. https://times-herald.com/news/2018/08/shenandoah-was-origin-of-new-community-zoning. 
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 33°21′N 84°46′W / 33.35, -84.76


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Coweta County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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