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Elmore County, Alabama
Elmore County Alabama Courthouse.JPG
County courthouse in Wetumpka
Map of Alabama highlighting Elmore County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the U.S. highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded February 15, 1866
Named for John A. Elmore
Seat Wetumpka
Largest city Millbrook
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

657 sq mi (1,702 km²)
618 sq mi (1,601 km²)
39 sq mi (101 km²), 5.9
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

87,977
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.elmoreco.org
Footnotes: *County Number 29 on Alabama Licence Plates

Elmore County is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census, the population was 87,977.[1] Its county seat is Wetumpka.[2] Its name is in honor of General John A. Elmore.[3]

Elmore County is part of the Montgomery, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

Elmore County was established on February 15, 1866, from portions of Autauga, Coosa, Tallapoosa, and Montgomery counties.[4]

The French established Fort Toulouse at the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa in 1717.[4]

Gen. Andrew Jackson then erected Fort Jackson in 1814 at the site of Fort Toulouse following the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.

On July 2, 1901, a local mob lynched Robert (or perhaps Robin) White. In a strange turn of events, a local farmer, George White confessed in court to the killing and named five other local men as killers. Three men were convicted in the killing and sentenced to ten years in prison. On 9 June 1902, they were pardoned by Governor Jelks. In 1915 another Black man was taken from the local jail and murdered.[5]

In 1950, a City Planning Board was formed in the county seat of Wetumpka.[6]

In 1957, the National Guard Armory was constructed in the county seat of Wetumpka.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 657 square miles (1,700 km2), of which 618 square miles (1,600 km2) is land and 39 square miles (100 km2) (5.9%) is water.[7]

The county is located on the fall line of the eastern United States, and consequently boasts a diverse geography. Most of the county contains rolling hills, being located in the Piedmont region. Some parts of the county do have open fields and farmland as well. The cities of Wetumpka and Tallassee are important river cities located on the fall line.

Major highways[]

  • I-65 (AL).svg Interstate 65
  • US 82.svg U.S. Highway 82
  • US 231.svg U.S. Highway 231
  • Alabama 9.svg State Route 9
  • Alabama 14.svg State Route 14
  • Alabama 50.svg State Route 50
  • Alabama 63.svg State Route 63
  • Alabama 111.svg State Route 111
  • Alabama 143.svg State Route 143
  • Alabama 170.svg State Route 170
  • Alabama 212.svg State Route 212
  • Alabama 229.svg State Route 229

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1870 14,477
1880 17,502 20.9%
1890 21,732 24.2%
1900 26,099 20.1%
1910 28,245 8.2%
1920 28,085 −0.6%
1930 34,280 22.1%
1940 34,546 0.8%
1950 31,649 −8.4%
1960 30,524 −3.6%
1970 33,661 10.3%
1980 43,390 28.9%
1990 49,210 13.4%
2000 65,874 33.9%
2010 79,303 20.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census[]

At the 2000 census there were 65,874 people, 22,737 households, and 17,552 families living in the county. The population density was 106 people per square mile (41/km2). There were 25,733 housing units at an average density of 41 per square mile (16/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 77.02% White, 20.64% Black or African American, 0.43% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[12] Of the 22,737 households 37.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.40% were married couples living together, 12.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.80% were non-families. 20.00% of households were one person and 7.70% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.07.

The age distribution was 25.70% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 32.10% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 10.70% 65 or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.30 males.

The median household income was $41,243 and the median family income was $47,155. Males had a median income of $32,643 versus $24,062 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,650. About 7.40% of families and 10.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.20% of those under age 18 and 11.30% of those age 65 or over. In the late 1990s, voters voted to pass a mandatory fire fee for volunteer fire services. All citizens pay this same fee regardless of valuation of the property or income levels.

2010 census[]

At the 2010 census there were 79,303 people, 28,301 households, and 21,003 families living in the county. The population density was 128 people per square mile (49/km2). There were 32,657 housing units at an average density of 49.7 per square mile (19.2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 76.2% White, 20.0% Black or African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.2% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. 2.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[13] Of the 28,301 households 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 22.0% of households were one person and 7.8% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.04.

The age distribution was 23.6% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% 65 or older. The median age was 37.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.

The median household income was $53,128 and the median family income was $62,870. Males had a median income of $46,952 versus $31,542 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,640. About 9.1% of families and 12.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.8% of those under age 18 and 9.4% of those age 65 or over.

2020 census[]

Elmore County racial composition[14]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 62,540 71.09%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 18,126 20.6%
Native American 270 0.31%
Asian 669 0.76%
Pacific Islander 28 0.03%
Other/Mixed 3,551 4.04%
Hispanic or Latino 2,793 3.17%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 87,977 people, 30,712 households, and 21,146 families residing in the county.

Government and infrastructure[]

The Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women of the Alabama Department of Corrections is in Wetumpka in Elmore County. The prison houses Alabama's female death row.[15] Wetumpka was previously the site of the Wetumpka State Penitentiary.

Politically, Elmore County is heavily Republican. It last voted Democratic for Jimmy Carter in 1976, which incidentally was also the last time a Democrat carried Alabama at the presidential level.

United States presidential election results for Elmore County, Alabama[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 30,164 73.52% 10,367 25.27% 499 1.22%
2016 27,634 74.17% 8,443 22.66% 1,183 3.17%
2012 26,253 73.86% 8,954 25.19% 339 0.95%
2008 25,777 75.12% 8,301 24.19% 237 0.69%
2004 22,056 76.90% 6,471 22.56% 153 0.53%
2000 16,777 70.48% 6,652 27.94% 375 1.58%
1996 12,937 61.76% 6,530 31.18% 1,479 7.06%
1992 11,356 55.70% 6,223 30.52% 2,809 13.78%
1988 10,852 69.84% 4,501 28.97% 186 1.20%
1984 11,694 72.74% 4,198 26.11% 185 1.15%
1980 8,688 57.20% 5,947 39.15% 555 3.65%
1976 6,551 48.50% 6,646 49.20% 311 2.30%
1972 8,461 79.90% 1,891 17.86% 238 2.25%
1968 801 6.78% 1,745 14.77% 9,266 78.45%
1964 6,363 83.77% 0 0.00% 1,233 16.23%
1960 1,919 35.48% 3,440 63.60% 50 0.92%
1956 1,619 30.01% 3,353 62.16% 422 7.82%
1952 1,315 23.83% 4,199 76.10% 4 0.07%
1948 167 6.50% 0 0.00% 2,403 93.50%
1944 184 5.58% 3,108 94.32% 3 0.09%
1940 144 3.26% 4,267 96.54% 9 0.20%
1936 182 4.24% 3,967 92.32% 148 3.44%
1932 160 4.39% 3,198 87.83% 283 7.77%
1928 1,770 57.45% 1,309 42.49% 2 0.06%
1924 219 16.43% 1,088 81.62% 26 1.95%
1920 353 16.64% 1,762 83.07% 6 0.28%
1916 0 0.00% 1,631 99.57% 7 0.43%
1912 81 5.74% 1,152 81.70% 177 12.55%
1908 138 11.23% 1,063 86.49% 28 2.28%
1904 151 10.67% 1,226 86.64% 38 2.69%
1900 1,104 36.33% 1,773 58.34% 162 5.33%
1896 1,379 39.78% 1,923 55.47% 165 4.76%
1892 84 2.18% 1,258 32.68% 2,507 65.13%
1888 1,535 47.20% 1,717 52.80% 0 0.00%



Economy[]

Over the past two decades, Elmore County has transferred from an economy based on agriculture to one of Alabama's fastest-growing counties. According to a recent report, 1110 jobs were created over the last 4 years.

Elmore County's largest employer is the manufacturing sector. The top ten manufacturers in Elmore County include: GKN Aerospace, Neptune Technologies, Frontier Yarns, Russell Corporation, Madix, Inc, Arrowhead Composites, Hanil USA, YESAC Alabama Corporation, Quality Networks, Inc., and AES Industries.

Education[]

The Elmore County Public School System serves the county.

Communities[]

Cities[]

Towns[]

  • Coosada
  • Deatsville
  • Eclectic
  • Elmore

Census-designated places[]

  • Blue Ridge
  • Emerald Mountain
  • Holtville
  • Redland
  • Equality

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Burlington
  • Kent
  • Seman
  • Titus

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Elmore County, Alabama
  • Properties on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in Elmore County, Alabama

References[]

  1. ^ a b "QuickFacts: Elmore County, Alabama; Population, Census, 2020 & 2010". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/elmorecountyalabama/POP010220. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 118. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_9V1IAAAAMAAJ. 
  4. ^ a b EL. "Alabama Dept of Archives". http://www.archives.alabama.gov/counties/Elmore.html. 
  5. ^ Lyman, Brian (January 10, 2018). "The lynching of Robin White and the confession of George Howard". Montgomery Advertiser. https://montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2018/04/24/murder-robin-white-george-howard-eji-montgomery-lynching-memorial-legacy-museum-peace-montgomery/499623002/. 
  6. ^ EL. "City of Wetumpka History". http://www.cityofwetumpka.com/Default.asp?ID=478&pg=History. 
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_01.txt. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/al190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  14. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US01051&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  15. ^ "Annual Report Fiscal Year 2003." Alabama Department of Corrections. 45/84. Retrieved on August 15, 2010. “Tutwiler also has a death row,”
  16. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 32°35′49″N 86°09′05″W / 32.59694, -86.15139

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Elmore County, Alabama. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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