Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Franklin County, North Carolina
N 56 180 Franklin County Courthouse, Louisburg, NC (8475122497).jpg
Franklin County Courthouse in Louisburg. July 1948.
Seal of Franklin County, North Carolina
Seal
Motto: LEGES JURAQUE VINDICAMUS
"We Defend Laws and Justice"
Map of North Carolina highlighting Franklin County
Location in the state of North Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1779
Named for Benjamin Franklin
Seat Louisburg
Largest town Louisburg
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

494 sq mi (1,279 km²)
492 sq mi (1,274 km²)
2.8 sq mi (7 km²), 0.6%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

68,573
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.franklincountync.us

Franklin County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2020 census, the population was 68,573.[1] Its county seat is Louisburg.[2]

Franklin County is included in the Raleigh, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Combined Statistical Area, which had a 2012 estimated population of 1,998,808.[3]

History[]

The county was formed in 1779 from the southern half of Bute County. It is named for Benjamin Franklin.[4] It is a part of the Research Triangle.

County formation timeline[]

  • 1664 Albemarle County formed (original, extinct)
  • 1668 Albemarle County subdivided into Carteret, Berkeley, & Shaftesbury Precincts
  • 1681 Shaftesbury Precinct renamed Chowan Precinct
  • 1722 Bertie Precinct formed from Chowan Precinct
  • 1739 Bertie Precinct becomes Bertie County
  • 1741 Edgecombe County formed from Bertie County
  • 1746 Granville County formed from Edgecombe County
  • 1754 Creation of Bertie Precinct, Edgecombe County, & Granville County repealed by King George II, in Privy Council
  • 1756 Bertie, Edgecombe, & Granville re-created
  • 1764 Bute County (extinct) formed from Granville County
  • 1779 Franklin County formed from Bute County (extinct)
  • 1787 Franklin County gains land from Wake County
  • 1875 Franklin County gains land from Granville County
  • 1881 Franklin County loses land to help form Vance County

School desegregation[]

The integration of Franklin County Schools in 1965–1968 was marked by a federal lawsuit and some violence against African-American residents. The North Carolina Humanities Council funded the Tar River Center for History and Culture at Louisburg College to prepare "An Oral History of School Desegregation in Franklin County, North Carolina."[5][6]

County song[]

The "Franklin County Song" was selected in a 1929 contest by the county historical association as the song most suitable for public occasions. The words were written by Fred U. Wolfe, an agriculture teacher at Gold Sand. Sung to the tune "Maryland, My Maryland" ("O Christmas Tree"), the song was incorporated in the Bicentennial programs of 1979. At the evening convocation of January 29, Mrs. Beth Norris announced to the audience that Wolfe (retired and residing in North, South Carolina) was aware his song was part of the program that night. (See Franklin Times, January 30, 1979.)[7]

With loyalty we sing thy praise,
Glory to thy honored name!
Our voices loud in tribute raise,
Making truth thy pow'r proclaim.
Thy past is marked with vict'ry bold;
Thy deeds today can ne'er be told,
And heroes brave shall e'er uphold
Franklin's name forevermore.

We love thy rich and fruitful soil,
Wood, and stream, and thriving town.
We love the gift of daily toil,
Making men of true renown.
Thy church and school shall ever stand
To drive the darkness from our land—
A true and loyal, valiant band,
Sons of Franklin evermore.

A shrine of promise, pow'r and truth,
Lasting righteousness and peace,
A land of hope for toiling youth,
Yielding songs that never cease.
Let ev'ry son and daughter stay
The hand of vice that brings decay.
When duty's voice we shall obey,
Franklin's name shall live for aye.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 494 square miles (1,280 km2), of which 492 square miles (1,270 km2) is land and 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2) (0.6%) is water.[8]

Major highways[]

  • [[Template:Infobox road/NC/link I-Future|Template:Infobox road/NC/abbrev I-Future]]
  • US 1
  • US 1A
  • US 64
  • US 401
  • NC 39
  • NC 56
  • NC 58
  • NC 96
  • NC 97
  • NC 98
  • NC 561
  • NC 581

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 7,502
1800 8,529 13.7%
1810 10,166 19.2%
1820 9,741 −4.2%
1830 10,665 9.5%
1840 10,980 3.0%
1850 11,713 6.7%
1860 14,107 20.4%
1870 14,134 0.2%
1880 20,829 47.4%
1890 21,090 1.3%
1900 25,116 19.1%
1910 24,692 −1.7%
1920 26,667 8.0%
1930 29,456 10.5%
1940 30,382 3.1%
1950 31,341 3.2%
1960 28,755 −8.3%
1970 26,820 −6.7%
1980 30,055 12.1%
1990 36,414 21.2%
2000 47,260 29.8%
2010 60,619 28.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2020[1]

2020 census[]

Franklin County racial composition[13]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 42,285 61.66%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 15,785 23.02%
Native American 259 0.38%
Asian 452 0.66%
Pacific Islander 17 0.02%
Other/Mixed 2,813 4.1%
Hispanic or Latino 6,962 10.15%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 68,573 people, 26,720 households, and 20,443 families residing in the county.

2010 census[]

As of the census[14] of 2010, there were 60,619 people, 23,023 households, and 16,317 families residing in the county. The population density was 123 people per square mile (47/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 66.0% White, 26.7% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 4.4% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. 7.9% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 23,023 households, out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 24.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.3% under the age of 20, 5.5% from 20 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 28.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.1 years. For every 100 females there were 99.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.0 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,696, and the median income for a family was $51,353. Males had a median income of $41,025 versus $34,562 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,399. About 12.3% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.6% of those under age 18 and 13.7% of those age 65 or over.

Housing[]

There were 26,577 housing units at an average density of 54 per square mile (21/km2). 13.4% of housing units were vacant.

There were 23,023 occupied housing units in the town. 17,029 were owner-occupied units (74.0%), while 5,994 were renter-occupied (26.0%). The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.4% of total units. The rental unit vacancy rate was 7.6%.[14]


Law and government[]

Franklin County is governed by an appointed county manager and a seven-member Board of Commissioners who are elected in staggered four-year terms. Five are chosen by district and the other two at-large.[15] Additional county officials who are elected include Sheriff, Register of Deeds, Board of Education and Clerk of Superior Court.[16]

Franklin County is patrolled by the Franklin County Sheriff's Office located in Louisburg. The current sheriff is Kent Winstead, who was elected in 2014.[17] Bunn, Franklinton, Louisburg and Youngsville have their own municipal police departments, regulated by the respective town governments. The community of Lake Royale near Bunn also has its own police department.[18] Franklin County also is covered by Troop C, District IV of the North Carolina Highway Patrol, located in Henderson, North Carolina.

  • County Manager: Kim Denton
  • County Assistant Manager: William Doerfer
  • Commissioner [District 1]: Kelli London
  • Commissioner [District 2]: Cedric K. Jones Sr.
  • Commissioner [District 3]: James Mark Speed
  • Commissioner [District 4]: David Bunn
  • Commissioner [District 5]: Michael Schriver
  • Commissioner [At-Large]: Harry L. Foy Jr.
  • Commissioner [At-Large]: Danny Pearce
  • Clerk to the Board: Kristen G. King
  • Sheriff: Kent Winstead
  • Clerk of Superior Court: Henry W. Hight Jr. (Interim)[19]
  • Register of Deeds: Brandi Brinson
  • Finance Director: Jamie Holtzman
  • Public Utilities Director: Chris Doherty
  • Emergency Management Director: VACANT
  • Public Information Officer: James Hicks


Franklin County is a member of the Kerr-Tar Regional Council of Governments.[20]

Politics[]

Franklin County, from 1912 until 1964, was a typical Solid South entity, with Democratic presidential candidates nearly always receiving 80 percent or more of the popular vote. George Wallace garnered the majority of the vote in 1968 as a third-party candidate. Beginning in 1972, the county swung in the opposite direction, with the Republican candidate earning the majority of the vote in most elections since.

United States presidential election results for Franklin County, North Carolina[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 20,901 55.96% 15,879 42.51% 571 1.53%
2016 16,368 53.90% 12,874 42.39% 1,126 3.71%
2012 14,603 51.44% 13,436 47.33% 350 1.23%
2008 13,273 49.83% 13,085 49.12% 281 1.05%
2004 11,540 55.17% 9,286 44.39% 92 0.44%
2000 8,501 52.96% 7,454 46.44% 96 0.60%
1996 5,648 43.36% 6,448 49.50% 930 7.14%
1992 4,669 35.20% 6,517 49.13% 2,080 15.68%
1988 5,499 50.17% 5,438 49.62% 23 0.21%
1984 5,984 55.57% 4,766 44.26% 18 0.17%
1980 3,508 38.63% 5,427 59.76% 146 1.61%
1976 2,630 32.50% 5,405 66.79% 58 0.72%
1972 5,431 68.37% 2,341 29.47% 172 2.17%
1968 1,375 14.10% 2,855 29.27% 5,525 56.64%
1964 2,097 31.53% 4,554 68.47% 0 0.00%
1960 1,108 17.90% 5,081 82.10% 0 0.00%
1956 792 13.00% 5,298 87.00% 0 0.00%
1952 740 12.10% 5,376 87.90% 0 0.00%
1948 234 4.72% 4,538 91.55% 185 3.73%
1944 289 6.79% 3,967 93.21% 0 0.00%
1940 227 4.58% 4,724 95.42% 0 0.00%
1936 231 4.25% 5,209 95.75% 0 0.00%
1932 199 4.42% 4,294 95.34% 11 0.24%
1928 729 20.48% 2,831 79.52% 0 0.00%
1924 302 13.10% 1,991 86.34% 13 0.56%
1920 589 17.68% 2,742 82.32% 0 0.00%
1916 396 16.14% 2,057 83.86% 0 0.00%
1912 71 3.12% 1,856 81.62% 347 15.26%
1908 561 22.04% 1,984 77.96% 0 0.00%
1904 282 11.84% 2,099 88.16% 0 0.00%
1900 1,602 35.98% 2,781 62.45% 70 1.57%
1896 1,834 36.30% 3,217 63.68% 1 0.02%
1892 993 24.13% 1,741 42.31% 1,381 33.56%
1888 2,019 47.64% 2,218 52.34% 1 0.02%
1884 1,997 48.49% 2,121 51.51% 0 0.00%
1880 2,012 49.75% 2,032 50.25% 0 0.00%



Education[]

Template:Unref section Franklin County Schools operates 16 schools throughout the county, ranging from pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. They include four high schools, four middle schools and eight elementary schools.

Franklin County is home to the two-year Methodist-affiliated Louisburg College and to a satellite campus of Vance-Granville Community College.

Youngsville Academy, a college-preparatory, tuition-free Charter School, opened in July 2015.

Communities[]

Map of Franklin County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

Towns[]

Census-designated places[]

  • Centerville
  • Lake Royale

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Alert
  • Epsom
  • Five Points
  • Gold Sand
  • Gupton
  • Halls Crossroads
  • Harris Crossroads
  • Hickory Rock
  • Ingleside
  • Katesville
  • Kearney
  • Justice
  • Laurel Mill
  • Mapleville
  • Margaret
  • Mitchiners Crossroads
  • Moulton
  • Needmore
  • New Hope
  • Oswego
  • Pearces
  • Pilot
  • Pine Ridge
  • Pocomoke
  • Raynor
  • Riley
  • Rocky Ford
  • Royal
  • Schloss
  • Seven Paths
  • Stallings Crossroads
  • Sutton
  • White Level
  • Wilders Corner
  • Wood

Townships[]

  • Cedar Rock
  • Cypress Creek
  • Dunn
  • Franklinton
  • Gold Sand
  • Harris
  • Hayesville
  • Louisburg
  • Sandy Creek
  • Youngsville

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Franklin County, North Carolina
  • Triangle North Executive Airport

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/all?q=Franklin%20County,%20North%20Carolina&g=1600000US3736513. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates 2012 Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/popest/data/metro/totals/2012/index.html. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 131. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_9V1IAAAAMAAJ. 
  5. ^ "An Oral History of School Desegregation in Franklin County, North Carolina". July 4, 2016. http://www.louisburg.edu/tarrivercenter/oralHistoryProject.html. 
  6. ^ Louisburg College (March 29, 2018). "County Schools Fully Desegregated Fifty Years Ago". https://www.louisburg.edu/_resources/tar-river-center/pdfs-files/County-Schools-Fully-Desegregated.pdf. 
  7. ^ Willard, George-Anne. Franklin County Sketchbook. Louisburg, NC: Franklin County-Louisburg Bicentenary Committee, 1982.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_37.txt. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/nc190090.txt. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  13. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US37069&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  14. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  15. ^ Franklin County, North Carolina (Commissioners), Retrieved Nov. 3, 2015.
  16. ^ Franklin County, North Carolina (Services), Retrieved Nov. 3, 2015.
  17. ^ Franklin County Sheriff's Office, Retrieved Nov. 3, 2015.
  18. ^ Lake Royale Police Department, Retrieved Nov. 3, 2015.
  19. ^ The Franklin Times', Court clerk's conduct case slated for hearing Thursday by Carey Johnson, July 29, 2020, Retrieved Sep. 16, 2020.
  20. ^ Kerr-Tar Regional Council of Governments, Retrieved Nov. 4, 2015.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 36°05′N 78°17′W / 36.08, -78.28


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Franklin County, North Carolina. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Advertisement