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Franklin County, Pennsylvania
Franklin County Courthouse at Night.png
Franklin County Courthouse
Seal of Franklin County, Pennsylvania
Seal
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Franklin County
Location in the state of Pennsylvania
Map of the U.S. highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Founded September 9, 1784
Named for Benjamin Franklin
Seat Chambersburg
Largest borough Chambersburg
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

773 sq mi (2,002 km²)
772 sq mi (1,999 km²)
0.6 sq mi (2 km²), 0.08
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

155,932
200/sq mi (77/km²)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.franklincountypa.gov/

Franklin County is a county located in South Central Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 155,932[1] Its county seat is Chambersburg.[2]

Franklin County comprises the Chambersburg–Waynesboro, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Washington–Baltimore–Arlington-DC–MD–VA–WV–PA Combined Statistical Area. It lies to a large extent within the Cumberland Valley.

History[]

Originally part of Lancaster County (1729), then York County (1749), then Cumberland County (1750), Franklin County became an independent jurisdiction on September 9, 1784, relatively soon after the end of the American Revolutionary War.[3] It is named in honor of Founding Father Benjamin Franklin.[4]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 773 square miles (2,000 km2), of which 772 square miles (2,000 km2) is land and 0.6 square miles (1.6 km2) (0.08%) is water.[5]

Franklin County is in the watershed of the Chesapeake Bay and the overwhelming majority of it is drained by the Potomac River, but the Conodoguinet Creek and the Sherman Creek drain northeastern portions into the Susquehanna River. It has a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa) and its hardiness zone is 6b. Average monthly temperatures in Chambersburg range from 29.9 °F in January to 74.7 °F in July. [1]

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

  • Template:Jct/2
  • I-81
  • US 11
  • US 30
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 16]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 75]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 163]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 316]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 433]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 997]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 233]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 274]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 416]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 456]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 533]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 641]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 696]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 995]]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 15,662
1800 19,638 25.4%
1810 23,083 17.5%
1820 31,892 38.2%
1830 35,037 9.9%
1840 37,793 7.9%
1850 39,904 5.6%
1860 42,126 5.6%
1870 45,365 7.7%
1880 49,855 9.9%
1890 51,433 3.2%
1900 54,902 6.7%
1910 59,775 8.9%
1920 62,275 4.2%
1930 65,010 4.4%
1940 69,378 6.7%
1950 75,927 9.4%
1960 88,172 16.1%
1970 100,833 14.4%
1980 113,629 12.7%
1990 121,082 6.6%
2000 129,308 6.8%
2010 149,618 15.7%

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 129,313 people, 50,633 households, and 36,405 families residing in the county. The population density was 168 people per square mile (65/km2). There were 53,803 housing units at an average density of 70 per square mile (27/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 95.33% White, 2.33% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.74% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. 1.75% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 40.2% were of German, 19.4% American, 7.6% Irish and 6.0% English ancestry. 96.0% spoke English and 2.1% Spanish as their first language.

There were 50,633 households, out of which 30.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.00% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.10% were non-families. 23.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.00% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 28.20% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.90 males.

In 2001, Franklin County was featured in David Brooks' article "One Nation, Slightly Divisible" in The Atlantic as a representative Red or Republican Party county.[7]

Government[]

County commissioners[8][]

  • David Keller, Chairman, Republican
  • John Flannery, Republican
  • Robert Ziobrowski, Democrat

Other county offices[9][]

  • Clerk of Courts, Todd Rock
  • Controller, Harold Wissinger
  • Coroner, Jeff Conner
  • District Attorney, Matthew Fogal
  • Prothonotary, Timothy Sponseller
  • Register and Recorder, Linda Miller
  • Sheriff, Dane Anthony
  • Treasurer, Dave Secor

State House of Representatives[10][]

  • Jesse Topper, Republican, Pennsylvania's 78th Representative District
  • Adam Harris, Republican, Pennsylvania's 82nd Representative District
  • Rob W. Kauffman, Republican, Pennsylvania's 89th Representative District
  • Paul Schemel, Republican, Pennsylvania's 90th Representative District

State Senate[10][]

  • Judy Ward, Republican, Pennsylvania's 30th Senatorial District
  • Doug Mastriano, Republican, Pennsylvania's 33rd Senatorial District

United States House of Representatives[]

  • John Joyce, Republican, Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district

Politics[]

For most of its history, Franklin County has been a Republican Party stronghold in presidential elections, with only three Democratic Party candidates having managed to win the county from 1880 to the present day. The most recent Democrat to win the county in a presidential election was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 as he won in a landslide statewide & nationally. As a testament to the county's status as a Republican Party stronghold, Jimmy Carter in 1976 is the lone Democrat to win forty percent of the county's votes since Johnson's 1964 win.

United States presidential election results for Franklin County, Pennsylvania[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 57,245 70.65% 22,422 27.67% 1,358 1.68%
2016 49,768 70.59% 17,465 24.77% 3,273 4.64%
2012 43,260 68.32% 18,995 30.00% 1,065 1.68%
2008 41,906 65.56% 21,169 33.12% 842 1.32%
2004 41,817 71.40% 16,562 28.28% 190 0.32%
2000 33,042 67.41% 14,922 30.44% 1,055 2.15%
1996 25,392 56.77% 14,980 33.49% 4,358 9.74%
1992 23,387 53.35% 13,440 30.66% 7,007 15.99%
1988 27,086 68.32% 12,368 31.20% 190 0.48%
1984 27,243 70.13% 11,480 29.55% 122 0.31%
1980 22,716 61.83% 12,061 32.83% 1,964 5.35%
1976 20,009 56.54% 14,643 41.38% 737 2.08%
1972 24,093 70.01% 9,456 27.48% 866 2.52%
1968 19,146 54.40% 11,451 32.54% 4,598 13.06%
1964 13,525 41.06% 19,332 58.68% 85 0.26%
1960 22,010 64.48% 12,088 35.41% 36 0.11%
1956 19,121 63.33% 11,060 36.63% 12 0.04%
1952 16,474 64.82% 8,868 34.89% 74 0.29%
1948 12,151 61.79% 7,352 37.39% 161 0.82%
1944 13,380 60.13% 8,807 39.58% 63 0.28%
1940 13,084 50.63% 12,713 49.20% 43 0.17%
1936 13,616 46.29% 15,632 53.15% 165 0.56%
1932 10,992 52.95% 9,338 44.99% 428 2.06%
1928 16,345 83.74% 3,027 15.51% 146 0.75%
1924 9,791 58.82% 5,770 34.67% 1,084 6.51%
1920 8,376 60.45% 5,020 36.23% 461 3.33%
1916 5,674 48.86% 5,336 45.95% 602 5.18%
1912 2,710 23.52% 4,505 39.10% 4,308 37.39%
1908 6,938 58.05% 4,682 39.17% 332 2.78%
1904 7,062 61.76% 4,114 35.98% 259 2.26%
1900 6,483 57.98% 4,500 40.24% 199 1.78%
1896 6,747 58.81% 4,425 38.57% 300 2.62%
1892 5,725 52.57% 4,965 45.59% 201 1.85%
1888 5,772 52.27% 5,082 46.02% 188 1.70%
1884 5,570 50.82% 5,261 48.00% 130 1.19%
1880 5,379 51.88% 4,964 47.88% 25 0.24%



United States Senate[]

  • Pat Toomey, Republican
  • Bob Casey, Democrat

Education[]

Universities and colleges[]

  • Wilson College
  • Penn State Mont Alto

Technology school[]

  • Franklin County Career and Technology Center
  • Chambersburg Area Career Magnet School
  • Triangle Tech

Intermediate unit[]

Lincoln Intermediate Unit (IU#12) region includes: Adams County, Franklin County and York County. The agency offers school districts, home-schooled students and private schools many services, including: special education services, combined purchasing, and instructional technology services. It runs Summer Academy, which offers both art and academic strands designed to meet the individual needs of gifted, talented and high achieving students. Additional services include: curriculum mapping, professional development for school employees, adult education, nonpublic school services, business services, migrant & ESL (English as a second language), instructional services, special education, management services, and technology services. It also provides a GED program to adults who want to earn a high school diploma and literacy programs. The Lincoln Intermediate Unit is governed by a 13-member board of directors, each a member of a local school board from the 25 school districts. Board members are elected by school directors of all 25 school districts for three-year terms that begin July 1.[12] There are 29 intermediate units in Pennsylvania. They are funded by school districts, state and federal program specific funding and grants. IUs do not have the power to tax.

Public school districts[]

  • Chambersburg Area School District
  • Fannett-Metal School District (also in Perry County)
  • Greencastle-Antrim School District
  • Shippensburg Area School District (also in Cumberland County)
  • Tuscarora School District
  • Waynesboro Area School District

Private schools[]

  • Anchor Christian Day School – Shippensburg
  • Antrim Mennonite School – Greencastle
  • Brook Side Amish School – Spring Run
  • Calvary Mennonite School – Chambersburg
  • Clearfield Parochial School – Shippensburg
  • Conococheague Amish School – Spring Run
  • Corpus Christi Catholic School – Chambersburg
  • Cornell Abraxas Leadership Development Program
  • Cornell Abraxas Youth Center – South Mountain
  • Culbertson Mennonite School – Chambersburg
  • Cumberland Valley Christian School – Chambersburg
  • Emmanuel Christian School – Chambersburg
  • Franklin Learning Center – Chambersburg
  • Highfield Christian Academy – Blue Ridge Summit
  • Living Word Academy – Blue Ridge Summit
  • Maple Grove Amish School Dry Run
  • McClays Mill Amish School – Newburg
  • Meadow Brook Amish School – Spring Run
  • Manito Day Treatment – Chambersburg
  • Mercersburg Academy – Mercersburg
  • Montessori Academy of Chambersburg
  • Mountain View Amish School – Spring Run
  • Mowersville Christian Academy – Newburg
  • Noahs Ark Christian Church Center – Waynesboro
  • Otterbein School – Shippensburg
  • Path Valley Christian School – Doylesburg
  • Portico River Brethren School – Chambersburg
  • Providence School – Waynesboro
  • St. Andrew the Apostle Catholic School – Waynesboro
  • Shady Grove Mennonite School – Greencastle
  • Shalom Christian Academy – Chambersburg
  • South Mountain Secure Treatment Unit – South Mountain
  • Stoney Creek Parochial School – Orrstown
  • Sunset Amish School – Newburg
  • Sweetwater Ridge School – Dry Run
  • Sylvan Learning Center – Chambersburg
  • Tunnel Run School – Newburg
  • Visionquest-South Mountain Lodge – South Mountain
  • Willow Hill Parochial School – Willow Hill

Fannettsburg, PA located in rural Northwestern Franklin County, PA

Libraries[]

The Franklin County Library system has five branches:

  • Blue Ridge Summit Free Library – Blue Ridge Summit
  • Coyle Free Library – Chambersburg
  • Grove Family Library – Chambersburg
  • Lilian S Besore Memorial Library – Greencastle
  • St Thomas Branch Library – Saint Thomas

The system also supports the Alexander Hamilton Memorial Library in Waynesboro, PA. In addition, the system currently operates two bookmobiles.[13]

Recreation[]

There are four Pennsylvania state parks in Franklin County.

  • Caledonia State Park straddles the Franklin and Adams County line along U.S. Route 30 between Chambersburg and Gettysburg.
  • Buchanan's Birthplace State Park is the birthplace of the 15th President of the United States, James Buchanan.
  • Mont Alto State Park is the oldest state park in Pennsylvania.
  • Cowans Gap State Park is largely surrounded by Buchanan State Forest and straddles the Franklin and Fulton County border.

Communities[]

Map of Franklin County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

House in Roxbury in Lurgan Township

Chambersburg is the county seat and largest municipality in Franklin County.

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs and townships are located in Franklin County:

Boroughs[]

Townships[]

  • Antrim Township
  • Fannett Township
  • Greene Township
  • Guilford Township
  • Hamilton Township
  • Letterkenny Township
  • Lurgan Township
  • Metal Township
  • Montgomery Township
  • Peters Township
  • Quincy Township
  • Southampton Township
  • St. Thomas Township
  • Warren Township
  • Washington Township

Census-designated places[]

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

  • Blue Ridge Summit
  • Fayetteville
  • Fort Loudon
  • Guilford
  • Marion
  • Pen Mar
  • Rouzerville
  • Scotland
  • State Line
  • Wayne Heights

Population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Franklin County.[14]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Chambersburg Borough 20,268
2 Waynesboro Borough 10,568
3 Shippensburg (mostly in Cumberland County) Borough 5,492
4 Greencastle Borough 3,996
5 Fayetteville CDP 3,128
6 State Line CDP 2,709
7 Wayne Heights CDP 2,545
8 Guilford CDP 2,138
9 Mont Alto Borough 1,705
10 Mercersburg Borough 1,561
11 Scotland CDP 1,395
12 Marion CDP 953
13 Pen Mar CDP 929
14 Rouzerville CDP 917
15 Blue Ridge Summit CDP 891
16 Fort Loudon CDP 886
17 Orrstown Borough 262

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Franklin County, Pennsylvania
  • Bloom Brothers Department Stores

References[]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/franklincountypennsylvania,US/POP010220. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Franklin County PA – default Script error: No such module "webarchive".. Co.franklin.pa.us. Retrieved on July 23, 2013.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 131. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_9V1IAAAAMAAJ. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_42.txt. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  7. ^ David Brooks (December 2001). "One Nation, Slightly Divisible". The Atlantic. 
  8. ^ "Franklin County, PA" (in en). http://www.franklincountypa.gov/index.php?section=commissioners_bios. 
  9. ^ "Franklin County, PA: Franklin County Elected Officials". https://www.franklincountypa.gov/index.php?section=about_Elected-Officials. 
  10. ^ a b Center, Legislativate Data Processing. "Find Your Legislator" (in en). http://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/legis/home/findyourlegislator/county_list.cfm?CNTYLIST=Franklin. 
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  12. ^ Lincoln Intermediate Unit 12 website accessed April 2010
  13. ^ "Locations" (in en-US). 2018-08-29. http://www.fclspa.org/locations/. 
  14. ^ "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html. 

Template:Franklin County, Pennsylvania, in the American Civil War

Coordinates: 39°56′N 77°43′W / 39.93, -77.72


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Franklin County, Pennsylvania. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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