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Gloucester County, New Jersey
Map of New Jersey highlighting Gloucester County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Map of the U.S. highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
Founded 1686
Seat Woodbury
Largest city Glassboro
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

337 sq mi (873 km²)
325 sq mi (842 km²)
12 sq mi (31 km²), 3.62%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

302,294
887/sq mi (342.3/km²)
Website www.co.gloucester.nj.us

Gloucester County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 302,294. Its county seat is Woodbury.[1]

This county is part of the Delaware Valley area. It is located south of Philadelphia and northwest of Atlantic City.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 337 square miles (872.8 km2), of which 325 square miles (841.7 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31.1 km2) (3.62%) is water.

Gloucester County is largely composed of low-lying rivers and coastal plains. The highest elevation in the county is a slight rise along County Route 654 southeast of Cross Keys that reaches approximately 180 feet (55 m) above sea level; the lowest point is sea level at the Delaware River.

Adjacent counties[]

National protected area[]

  • Great Egg Harbor Scenic and Recreational River (part)

History[]

Swedesboro and Bridgeport, were the among the earliest European settlements in New Jersey as a part of the 17th century New Sweden colony. Gloucester dates back to May 26, 1686, when courts were established separate from those of Burlington. It was officially formed and its boundaries defined as part of West Jersey on May 17, 1694. Portions of Gloucester County were set off on February 7, 1837 to create Atlantic County, and on March 13, 1844 to create Camden County.[2] The county was named for either the English city of Gloucester or Henry Stuart, Duke of Gloucester, brother of Charles II of England

Woodbury, founded in 1683 by Henry Wood, is the oldest town in the county.[3] National Park, another town in the county, was the site of the Revolutionary War Battle of Red Bank (now included in a county park) where Fort Mercer once stood. Here can be seen the remains of the British ship Augusta (it is stored in a shed with windows for visitors to the park to look through to see the ship's pieces), which sank during the battle. During the colonial era, Gloucester County's main economic activity was agriculture. In Woodbury (even then the main town) was located the county courthouse, the county jail, a Quaker meeting house (still in existence), and an inn (on the current location of Woodbury Crossings). Because of the county's many creeks leading to the Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean, smuggling was very common.

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 13,363
1800 16,115 20.6%
1810 19,744 22.5%
1820 23,089 16.9%
1830 28,431 23.1%
1840 25,438 * −10.5%
1850 14,655 * −42.4%
1860 18,444 25.9%
1870 21,562 16.9%
1880 25,886 20.1%
1890 28,649 10.7%
1900 31,905 11.4%
1910 37,368 17.1%
1920 48,224 29.1%
1930 70,802 46.8%
1940 72,219 2.0%
1950 91,727 27.0%
1960 134,840 47.0%
1970 172,681 28.1%
1980 199,917 15.8%
1990 230,082 15.1%
2000 254,673 10.7%
2010 288,288 13.2%
* lost territory

historical census data source:[4][5] [6]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 254,673 people, 90,717 households, and 67,221 families residing in the county. The population density was 784 people per square mile (303/km²). There were 95,054 housing units at an average density of 293 per square mile (113/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 87.07% White, 9.06% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 1.49% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.85% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. 2.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.8% were of Italian, 19.3% Irish, 15.8% German and 7.6% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.40% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 30.40% from 25 to 44, 22.60% from 45 to 64, and 11.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $54,273, and the median income for a family was $62,482 (these figures had risen to $69,990 and $82,556 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[8]). Males had a median income of $43,825 versus $31,077 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,708. About 4.30% of families and 6.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.60% of those under age 18 and 7.00% of those age 65 or over.

Government[]

The Acting Gloucester County Prosecutor is Christine A. Hoffman, who was appointed in March 2020 to succeed Charles A. Fiore.[9]

Gloucester County is a part of Vicinage 15 of the New Jersey Superior Court (along with Cumberland and Salem counties), seated in Woodbury in Gloucester County; the Assignment Judge for the vicinage is Benjamin C. Telsey. The Gloucester County Courthouse is in Woodbury.[10]

Federal representatives[]

Gloucester County is included in the 1st and 2nd Congressional Districts.[11][12] The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[13] Template:NJ Congress 02

State representatives[]

District Senator[14] Assembly [14] Municipalities
3rd Stephen M. Sweeney (D) John J. Burzichelli (D)

Adam Taliaferro (D)

Clayton, East Greenwich Township, Elk Township, Franklin Township, Glassboro, Greenwich Township,

Logan Township, National Park, Newfield, Paulsboro, South Harrison Township,

Swedesboro, West Deptford Township, Woodbury Heights and Woolwich Township.

The remainder of this district includes portions of Cumberland County and all of Salem County.

4th Fred H. Madden (D) Paul Moriarty (D)

Gabriela Mosquera (D)

Monroe Township, Pitman Borough and Washington Township.

The remainder of this district covers portions of Camden County.

5th Nilsa Cruz-Perez (D) William Spearman (D)

Bill Moen (D)

Deptford Township, Harrison Township, Mantua Township, Wenonah, Westville and Woodbury.

The remainder of this district includes portions of Camden County,


The county is part of the 3rd, 4th and 5th Districts in the New Jersey Legislature

The county leans toward the Democratic Party, though to a slightly lesser degree than the state of New Jersey as a whole. In the 2004 U.S. presidential election, John Kerry carried Gloucester County by a 5.3% margin over George W. Bush, while Kerry carried the state by 6.7% over Bush.

In the 2008 U.S. presidential election, Barack Obama carried Gloucester County by a 12.2% margin over John McCain, while Obama carried the state by 15.5% over McCain.[15] However, in the 2009 Gubernatorial Election, Republican Chris Christie received 47% of the vote, defeating Democrat Jon Corzine, who received around 43%. In 2016, Donald Trump became the first Republican to win Gloucester County since 1988 when George H.W. Bush won it; 1988 was the last year a Republican won New Jersey's electoral votes as well. However, a year later, Gloucester County narrowly opted for Democrat Phil Murphy over Republican Kim Guadagno in the gubernatorial election. In the 2020 Presidential Election, Democrat Joe Biden was declared victor in the county.

As of August 1, 2020, there were 219,937 registered voters in Gloucester County, of whom 87,924 (40%) were registered as Democrats, 52,376 (23.8%) were registered as Republicans and 76,930 (35%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2,707 (1.2%) voters registered to other parties.[16]

United States presidential election results for Gloucester County, New Jersey[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 83,340 48.05% 86,702 49.99% 3,411 1.97%
2016 67,544 47.82% 66,870 47.34% 6,840 4.84%
2012 59,456 43.86% 74,013 54.59% 2,101 1.55%
2008 60,315 43.10% 77,267 55.21% 2,364 1.69%
2004 60,033 46.91% 66,835 52.23% 1,096 0.86%
2000 42,315 39.44% 61,095 56.94% 3,888 3.62%
1996 32,116 31.96% 51,915 51.66% 16,464 16.38%
1992 37,335 35.69% 42,425 40.55% 24,859 23.76%
1988 51,708 58.68% 35,479 40.26% 930 1.06%
1984 54,041 62.08% 32,702 37.57% 307 0.35%
1980 40,306 51.08% 29,804 37.77% 8,793 11.14%
1976 34,888 46.33% 38,726 51.43% 1,688 2.24%
1972 44,806 62.92% 25,509 35.82% 894 1.26%
1968 30,596 44.52% 27,438 39.92% 10,697 15.56%
1964 23,702 37.00% 40,305 62.93% 45 0.07%
1960 32,474 52.16% 29,752 47.79% 33 0.05%
1956 30,646 60.41% 20,007 39.44% 75 0.15%
1952 25,103 54.89% 20,536 44.90% 98 0.21%
1948 19,477 54.46% 15,785 44.14% 503 1.41%
1944 16,684 48.28% 17,758 51.39% 113 0.33%
1940 17,674 46.38% 20,284 53.22% 153 0.40%
1936 15,813 43.18% 20,516 56.02% 293 0.80%
1932 18,782 55.96% 13,817 41.17% 962 2.87%
1928 25,627 79.34% 6,594 20.41% 81 0.25%
1924 15,513 72.74% 4,167 19.54% 1,648 7.73%
1920 11,693 66.60% 4,869 27.73% 995 5.67%
1916 5,352 54.82% 3,745 38.36% 665 6.81%
1912 1,856 21.12% 3,364 38.29% 3,566 40.59%
1908 5,318 56.38% 3,706 39.29% 409 4.34%
1904 4,829 59.14% 2,818 34.51% 518 6.34%
1900 4,471 57.60% 2,828 36.43% 463 5.96%
1896 4,727 59.02% 2,981 37.22% 301 3.76%



Transportation[]

Various county, state, U.S. routes and interstates pass through the county. Major county highways include County Road 534, County Road 536, County Road 538, County Road 544, County Road 551, County Road 553, County Road 555 and County Road 557.

State Routes include Route 41, Route 42 (part of the North-South Freeway), Route 45, Route 47, Route 55, Route 77, Route 168 and Route 324 (only in Logan). The three U.S. routes that traverse include U.S. Route 130 in the northwest, U.S. Route 322 near the center, and U.S. Route 40 in the southern tip.

Interstate 295 is the only interstate in the county which also runs through the northwest for about 14 miles. The New Jersey Turnpike also passes through in the northwest. Only one turnpike interchange is located within Gloucester: Exit 2 in Woolwich.

Municipalities[]

Index map of Gloucester County municipalities (click to see index key)

The following municipalities are located in Gloucester County. The municipality type is listed in parentheses after the name, except where the type is included as part of the name. Census-designated places and other unincorporated communities are listed under their municipalities.

  • Clayton (borough)
  • Deptford Township
    • Oak Valley
    • Almonesson
    • Jericho
    • Salina
    • Good Intent
    • Gardenville Center
  • East Greenwich Township
    • Mount Royal
    • Mickleton
    • Wolfert
    • Tomlin
  • Elk Township
    • Hardingville
    • Aura
  • Franklin Township
    • Franklinville
    • Fries Mill
    • Star Cross
    • Janvier
    • Porchtown
    • Plainville
    • Malaga
    • Forest Grove
  • Glassboro (borough)
  • Greenwich Township
    • Gibbstown
    • Billingsport
  • Harrison Township
  • Logan Township
    • Beckett
    • Bridgeport
    • Center Square
    • Nortonville
    • Repaupo
  • Mantua Township
    • Barnsboro
    • Sewell
  • Monroe Township
    • Victory Lakes
    • Williamstown
    • Cross Keys
    • New Brooklyn
    • Broad Lane
    • Cecil
  • National Park (borough)
  • Newfield (borough)
  • Paulsboro (borough)
  • Pitman (borough)
  • South Harrison Township
    • Harrisonville
    • Cedar Grove
  • Swedesboro (borough)
  • Washington Township
    • Turnersville
    • Hurffville
    • Grenloch
  • Wenonah (borough)
  • West Deptford Township
    • Colonial Manor
    • Greenfields Village
    • Mantua Grove
    • Red Bank
    • Thorofare
    • Verga
  • Westville (borough)
  • Woodbury (city)
  • Woodbury Heights (borough)
  • Woolwich Township
    • Asbury
    • Sandy Hill
    • Grand Sprute
    • Porches Mill

Emergency services[]

Gloucester County is home to the first county based EMS agency in New Jersey providing services to the municipalities of Logan, Woolwich, Swedesboro, East Greenwich, Gibbstown, Paulsboro, West Deptford, National Park, Mantua, Pitman, Glassboro, Clayton, Woodbury, South Harrison and Wenonah. GCEMS was started in September 2007; its goal is to provide emergency medical services to the residents of the county within 8:59 seconds from the time of dispatch 90% of the time (considered to be the gold standard in EMS). Currently GCEMS has 10 ambulances in service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 2 "power shift" ambulances on duty from the hours of 8AM to 9PM 7 days a week. The department operates out of 11 stations spread strategically throughout the county. The Gloucester County EMS administrative offices are located at the county's Emergency Response Center at 1200 N. Delsea Drive, Clayton, New Jersey 08312.[18] It is the winner of the 2010 Outstanding Public EMS Agency by the State of New Jersey.

Education[]

Unified school districts[]

School districts in the county include the Gloucester County Vocational-Technical School District, with its one school being the Gloucester County Institute of Technology.

Colleges and universities[]

The county college is Gloucester County College. Rowan University is in Glassboro.

Notable residents[]

  • Linda Fiorentino, actress (Mantua Township).
  • Tara Lipinski, Olympic gold medal winner, figure skating (Mantua Township).
  • Bryant McKinnie, professional football player, Minnesota Vikings (Woodbury).
  • J. Hampton Moore, former Mayor of Philadelphia (Woodbury).
  • Milt Plum, former professional football player, Cleveland Browns, Detroit Lions, Los Angeles Rams and New York Giants (Westville).
  • Jimmy Rollins, professional baseball player, Philadelphia Phillies (Woolwich Township).
  • Patti Smith, punk rock musician (Woodbury).
  • Steven Squyres, scientist, Squyres is the Goldwin Smith Professor of Astronomy at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He is principal investigator of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission (MER) (Wenonah).
  • Charles C. Stratton, former Member of Congress (Swedesboro).

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Gloucester County, New Jersey

References[]

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  2. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 137.
  3. ^ History of Woodbury, accessed January 26, 2007
  4. ^ "New Jersey Resident Population by County: 1880 – 1930". http://www.wnjpin.net/OneStopCareerCenter/LaborMarketInformation/lmi01/poptrd5.htm. 
  5. ^ "Geostat Center: Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/. Retrieved 2007-03-02. 
  6. ^ "The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010". U.S. Census Bureau. 2011-02-03. http://2010.census.gov/news/xls/st34-final_newjersey.xls. Retrieved 2011-02-05. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ACSSAFFFacts?_event=Search&geo_id=05000US34005&_geoContext=01000US%7C04000US34%7C05000US34005&_street=&_county=gloucester+county&_cityTown=gloucester+county&_state=04000US34&_zip=&_lang=en&_sse=on&ActiveGeoDiv=geoSelect&_useEV=&pctxt=fph&pgsl=050&_submenuId=factsheet_1&ds_name=ACS_2007_3YR_SAFF&_ci_nbr=null&qr_name=null&reg=null%3Anull&_keyword=&_industry=
  9. ^ "Christine A. Hoffman Appointed Acting Gloucester County Prosecutor; Prosecutor Charles A. Fiore Resigns", New Jersey Attorney General, March 5, 2020. Accessed December 5, 2020. "Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal announced that he has appointed Christine A. Hoffman to serve as Acting Gloucester County Prosecutor, replacing Charles A. Fiore, who resigned as Prosecutor effective noon today."
  10. ^ Cumberland/Gloucester/Salem Counties, New Jersey Courts. Accessed August 15, 2017.
  11. ^ 2012 Congressional Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 4, 2013.
  12. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2011. Accessed October 4, 2013.
  13. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  14. ^ a b "New Jersey Legislature - Legislative Roster". https://www.njleg.state.nj.us/members/roster.asp. 
  15. ^ U.S. Election Atlas
  16. ^ "NJ Voter Registration by County". https://nj.gov/state/elections/assets/pdf/svrs-reports/2020/2020-08-voter-registration-by-county.pdf. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  18. ^ "Gloucester County Celebrates Emergency Medical Services Week", Gloucester County press release, dated May 21, 2008. Accessed June 28, 2008.

External links[]


Coordinates: 39°43′N 75°08′W / 39.71, -75.14


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Gloucester County, New Jersey. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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