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Greater Cleveland Area
—  CSA  —
Cleveland
Elyria
Mentor
Country United States
States Ohio
Largest city Cleveland, Ohio
other cities
Population (2010)
 • Urban 1,786,647 (21st)
 • MSA 2,077,240(26th)
 • CSA 2,891,988 (16th)
  MSA/CSA = 2009, Urban = 2000
Time zone ET (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 216, 330, 440, 234

NASA image of Greater Cleveland and Lake Erie

Map of the Cleveland-Akron-Elyria CSA

Greater Cleveland is a nickname for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland, Ohio and is part of what used to be the Connecticut Western Reserve.

Northeast Ohio refers to a similar but substantially larger area as described below. This article covers the area generally considered to be Greater Cleveland, but includes information on the entire region of Northeast Ohio which includes the cities of Cleveland, Akron, Canton, Elyria, Lorain, Warren, and Youngstown.

According to the 2010 Census, the five-county Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) consists of Cuyahoga County, Geauga County, Lake County, Lorain County, and Medina County, and has a population of 2,077,240.[1] Greater Cleveland is the largest metropolitan area in Ohio.

The larger Cleveland-Akron-Elyria Combined Statistical Area is the 14th-largest Combined Statistical Area in the United States, and includes the above counties plus Ashtabula County, Portage County and Summit County, with a population of 2,881,937.

The Cleveland-Akron-Canton television Designated Market Area covers this area, and all of Northeast Ohio except for the Youngstown/Warren region. It is the 16th largest in the United States, according to Nielsen Media Research.

However, the areas commonly understood as Greater Cleveland or Northeast Ohio are not precisely defined. Most often, Greater Cleveland is understood as referring to all of Cuyahoga County, and a number of surrounding communities. The Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor MSA covers most of this area and some smaller outlying communities.

One organization states that Northeast Ohio consists of 16 counties (Ashland, Ashtabula, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Richland, Stark, Summit, Trumbull and Wayne counties)[2] and includes the cities of Cleveland, Akron, Canton, Lorain, Elyria, Medina, Ashtabula, Youngstown, and Warren. Northeast Ohio is home to approximately 4.5 million people, has a labor force of almost 2 million, and a gross regional product of more than US$134 billion.

Additional counties are often (but not always) considered to be in Northeast Ohio. These locations include Erie, Holmes, Huron and Tuscarawas counties, thus making the total population of the entire northeastern section of Ohio well over 5 million people.

The areas commonly referred to as Greater Cleveland or Northeast Ohio are not precisely the same as either the Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor MSA or the Cleveland-Akron-Elyria Combined Statistical Area defined by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Some geographers describe the area stretching from Cleveland to Pittsburgh as the "Steel City Corridor", encompassing the cities of Akron, Canton, and Youngstown.

Counties[]

Cities, townships, and villages[]

Cuyahoga County[]

  • Bay Village
  • Beachwood
  • Bedford
  • Bedford Heights
  • Bentleyville
  • Berea
  • Bratenahl
  • Brecksville
  • Broadview Heights
  • Brook Park
  • Brooklyn
  • Brooklyn Heights
  • Chagrin Falls
  • Chagrin Falls Township
  • Cleveland
  • Cleveland Heights
  • Cuyahoga Heights
  • East Cleveland
  • Euclid
  • Fairview Park
  • Garfield Heights
  • Gates Mills
  • Glenwillow
  • Highland Heights
  • Highland Hills
  • Hunting Valley
  • Independence
  • Lakewood
  • Linndale
  • Lyndhurst
  • Maple Heights
  • Mayfield Heights
  • Mayfield Village
  • Middleburg Heights
  • Moreland Hills
  • Newburgh Heights
  • North Olmsted
  • North Randall
  • North Royalton
  • Oakwood
  • Olmsted Falls
  • Olmsted Township
  • Orange
  • Parma
  • Parma Heights
  • Pepper Pike
  • Richmond Heights
  • Rocky River
  • Seven Hills
  • Shaker Heights
  • Solon
  • South Euclid
  • Strongsville
  • University Heights
  • Valley View
  • Walton Hills
  • Warrensville Heights
  • Westlake
  • Woodmere

Geauga County[]

  • Aquilla
  • Auburn Township
  • Bainbridge Township
  • Burton
  • Burton Township
  • Chardon
  • Chardon Township
  • Chester
  • Chesterland
  • Claridon Township
  • Hambden Township
  • Hunting Valley (part)
  • Huntsburg Township
  • Middlefield
  • Middlefield Township
  • Montville Township
  • Munson Township
  • Newbury Township
  • Parkman Township
  • Russell Township
  • South Russell
  • Thompson Township
  • Troy Township

Lake County[]

  • Concord Township
  • Eastlake
  • Fairport Harbor
  • Grand River
  • Kirtland
  • Kirtland Hills
  • Lakeline
  • LeRoy Township
  • Madison
  • Madison Township
  • Mentor
  • Mentor-on-the-Lake
  • North Madison
  • North Perry
  • Painesville
  • Painesville Township
  • Perry
  • Perry Township
  • Timberlake
  • Waite Hill
  • Wickliffe
  • Willoughby
  • Willoughby Hills
  • Willowick

Lorain County[]

  • Amherst
  • Amherst Township
  • Avon
  • Avon Lake
  • Brighton Township
  • Brownhelm Township
  • Camden Township
  • Carlisle Township
  • Columbia Township
  • Eaton Estates
  • Eaton Township
  • Elyria
  • Elyria Township
  • Grafton
  • Grafton Township
  • Henrietta Township
  • Huntington Township
  • Kipton
  • Lagrange
  • LaGrange Township
  • Lorain
  • New Russia Township
  • North Ridgeville
  • Oberlin
  • Penfield Township
  • Pittsfield Township
  • Rochester
  • Rochester Township
  • Sheffield
  • Sheffield Lake
  • Sheffield Township
  • South Amherst
  • Vermilion (portions in Erie and Lorain Counties)
  • Wellington
  • Wellington Township

Medina County[]

  • Brunswick
  • Brunswick Hills Township
  • Chatham Township
  • Chippewa Lake
  • Creston
  • Gloria Glens Park
  • Granger Township
  • Guilford Township
  • Harrisville Township
  • Hinckley Township
  • Homer Township
  • Lafayette Township
  • Litchfield Township
  • Liverpool Township
  • Lodi
  • Medina
  • Medina Township
  • Montville Township
  • Rittman
  • Seville
  • Sharon Township
  • Spencer
  • Spencer Township
  • Wadsworth
  • Wadsworth Township
  • Westfield Center
  • Westfield Township
  • York Township

Portage County[]

  • Atwater Township
  • Aurora
  • Brady Lake
  • Brimfield Township
  • Charlestown Township
  • Deerfield Township
  • Edinburg Township
  • Franklin Township
  • Freedom Township
  • Garrettsville
  • Hiram
  • Hiram Township
  • Kent
  • Mantua
  • Mantua Township
  • Mogadore (portions in Portage and Summit Counties)
  • Nelson Township
  • Palmyra Township
  • Paris Township
  • Randolph Township
  • Ravenna
  • Ravenna Township
  • Rootstown Township
  • Shalersville Township
  • Streetsboro
  • Suffield Township
  • Sugar Bush Knolls
  • Tallmadge (portion in Portage County, mostly in Summit County)
  • Windham
  • Windham Township

Summit County[]

  • Akron
  • Barberton
  • Bath Township
  • Boston Heights
  • Boston Township
  • Clinton
  • Copley Township
  • Coventry Township
  • Cuyahoga Falls
  • Fairlawn
  • Green
  • Hudson
  • Lakemore
  • Macedonia
  • Mogadore
  • Munroe Falls
  • New Franklin
  • Northfield
  • Northfield Center Township
  • Norton
  • Peninsula
  • Reminderville
  • Richfield
  • Richfield Township
  • Sagamore Hills Township
  • Silver Lake
  • Springfield Township
  • Stow
  • Tallmadge
  • Twinsburg
  • Twinsburg Township

Area codes[]

In the 1950s, AT&T assigned Northeast Ohio the 216 area code, and in 1996, Northeast Ohio was divided into two area codes. Area code 216 was reduced in size to cover the northern half of its prior area, centering on Cleveland and its lake shore suburbs. Area code 330 was introduced for remaining outlying areas formerly covered by area code 216, including Akron, Brunswick, Canton, Medina, Warren and Youngstown.

In 1997, area code 216 was further split as the need for additional phone numbers grew. Area code 216 was again reduced in geographical area to cover the city of Cleveland and its inner ring suburbs. Area code 440 was introduced to cover the remainder of was what previously area code 216, including the communities of Mentor, Elyria, Painesville, North Ridgeville, Strongsville, Brecksville, Lorain, and other Greater Cleveland communities. Some communities, such as Parma, and Parma Heights were divided into multiple area codes. In 1999, Congressman Dennis Kucinich introduced federal legislation to protect small and medium-sized cities from being split into two or more area codes.[3][4]

In 2000, it was anticipated that the available phone numbers in area code 330 would be exhausted, and an overlay area code was introduced. Area code 234 was assigned to overlap existing area code 330. With the creation of area code 234, any new phone number in the geographical area formerly covered by area code 330 could be assigned a phone number in either the 234 or 330 area codes, with no change in local or long distance toll status. This made necessary the use of ten-digit dialing within the 330/234 area code region. After the introduction of area code 234, assignments of new telephone numbers in the area did not continue at an accelerated pace, and new phone numbers for area code 234 were not assigned until 2003.[5]

Business and industry[]

More than 37% of Fortune 500 companies are present in Northeast Ohio, through corporate headquarters, major divisions, subsidiaries, and sales offices. In addition, more than 150 international companies have a presence there. As of 2006, Northeast Ohio serves as the corporate headquarters of 25 Fortune 1000 firms (shown with 2006 rankings below):

  • (#112) Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company (Akron, rubber)
  • (#153) Progressive Insurance (Mayfield Village, insurance)
  • (#184) FirstEnergy (Akron, utilities)
  • (#210) Eaton Corporation (Cleveland, motor vehicle parts)
  • (#279) Parker-Hannifin (Mayfield Heights, aerospace)
  • (#311) Sherwin-Williams (Cleveland, paint)
  • (#325) KeyCorp (Cleveland, banking)
  • (#417) The Timken Company (Canton, specialty steel)
  • (#486) Lubrizol Corporation (Wickliffe, lubricants and chemicals)
  • (#589) Nacco Industries (Cleveland, industrial equipment)
  • (#671) Diebold (Green, electronics)
  • (#674) PolyOne Corporation (Avon Lake, chemicals)
  • (#678) RPM International (Medina, chemicals)
  • (#704) Aleris International, Inc. (Beachwood, metals)
  • (#765) The J.M. Smucker Co. (Orrville, food consumer products)
  • (#825) American Greetings (Brooklyn, greeting cards)
  • (#839) Jo Ann Stores (Hudson, specialty retailer)
  • (#846) Medical Mutual of Ohio (Cleveland, health insurance)
  • (#878) Cliffs Natural Resources (Cleveland, iron ore mining)
  • (#888) Applied Industrial Technologies (Cleveland, bearings)
  • (#922) Agilysis (Mayfield Heights, electronics)
  • (#928) Lincoln Electric (Cleveland, arc welding equipment)
  • (#955) Invacare (Elyria, medical products and equipment)
  • (#995) A. Schulman (Fairlawn, chemicals)

Other large employers include:

  • Babcock & Wilcox (Barberton, engineering)
  • Cafaro Corp (Youngstown, mall management and properties)
  • Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, health care)
  • Developers Diversified Realty Corporation (Beachwood, real estate development)
  • DeBartolo-York Corp (Boardman Township, Youngstown, mall management and properties)
  • Exal Corp Aluminum Production (Youngstown, metals)
  • FirstMerit (Akron, banking)
  • Forest City Enterprises (Cleveland, real estate development)
  • Gojo (Akron, chemicals)
  • Home Savings and Loan (Youngstown, banking)
  • IMG (Cleveland, sports marketing and management)
  • Jones Day (Cleveland, legal services)
  • Nestlé USA (Solon, food processing)
  • Roadway Express (Akron, logistics)
  • Summa Health System (Akron, heath care)
  • (#429 in 2009) Rockwell Automation (Mayfield Heights, industrial controls)
  • University Hospitals of Cleveland (Cleveland, health care)

Small businesses and startups[]

The Council of Smaller Enterprises coordinates and advocates for small businesses in the region.[6][7] Many of the area's sustainability-oriented companies are tied into the network Entrepreneurs for Sustainability.[8][9]

Colleges and universities[]

Greater Cleveland is home to a number of higher education institutions, including:

  • Baldwin-Wallace College (Berea)
  • Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland)
  • Cleveland College of Jewish Studies (Beachwood)
  • Cleveland Institute of Art (Cleveland)
  • Cleveland Institute of Music (Cleveland)
  • Cleveland State University (Cleveland)
  • Cuyahoga Community College (Cleveland, Highland Hills, and Parma)
  • Fortis College (Ravenna)
  • Hiram College (Hiram)
  • John Carroll University (University Heights)
  • Kent State University (Kent)
  • Lake Erie College (Painesville)
  • Lakeland Community College (Kirtland)
  • Lorain County Community College (Elyria)
  • Myers University (formerly Dyke College) (Cleveland)
  • Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine (Rootstown)
  • Notre Dame College (South Euclid)
  • Oberlin College (Oberlin)
  • Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (Cleveland)
  • Stautzenberger College, Brecksville (Brecksville)
  • University of Akron (Akron)
  • Ursuline College (Pepper Pike)
  • Youngstown State University (Youngstown)

Transportation[]

Airports[]

Greater Cleveland is served by international, regional and county airports, including:

  • Akron-Canton Regional Airport (Green)
  • Akron Fulton International Airport (Akron)
  • Burke Lakefront Airport (Cleveland)
  • Concord Airpark Airport (Concord Township)
  • Cuyahoga County Airport
  • Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (Cleveland)
  • Kent State University Airport (Stow)
  • Lansdowne Airport (Youngstown)
  • Lorain County Regional Airport (Russia Township)
  • Portage County Regional Airport (Shalersville Township)
  • Willoughby Lost Nation Municipal Airport (Willoughby)
  • Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport (Vienna)

Highways[]

The Greater Cleveland highway network

  • I-71.svgInterstate 71
  • I-76.svgInterstate 76
  • I-77.svgInterstate 77
  • I-80.svgOhioTurnpike.svg Interstate 80 (Ohio Turnpike)
  • I-90.svgInterstate 90
  • I-271.svgInterstate 271
  • I-277.svgInterstate 277
  • I-480.svgInterstate 480
  • I-490.svgInterstate 490
  • I-680.svgInterstate 680
  • US 6.svgU.S. Route 6
  • US 20.svgU.S. Route 20
  • US 42.svgU.S. Route 42
  • US 224.svgU.S. Route 224
  • US 250.svgU.S. Route 250
  • US 322.svgU.S. Route 322
  • US 422.svgU.S. Route 422
  • OH-2.svgOhio State Route 2
  • OH-3.svgOhio State Route 3
  • OH-5.svgOhio State Route 5
  • OH-8.svgOhio State Route 8
  • OH-10.svgOhio State Route 10
  • OH-11.svgOhio State Route 11
  • OH-14.svgOhio State Route 14
  • OH-17.svgOhio State Route 17
  • OH-18.svgOhio State Route 18
  • OH-21.svgOhio State Route 21
  • OH-43.svgOhio State Route 43
  • OH-44.svgOhio State Route 44
  • OH-59.svgOhio State Route 59
  • OH-83.svgOhio State Route 83
  • OH-88.svgOhio State Route 88
  • OH-91.svgOhio State Route 91
  • OH-113.svgOhio State Route 113
  • OH-175.svgOhio State Route 175
  • OH-176.svgOhio State Route 176
  • OH-225.svgOhio State Route 225
  • OH-254.svgOhio State Route 254
  • OH-261.svgOhio State Route 261
  • OH-700.svgOhio State Route 700
  • OH-711.svgOhio State Route 711


Highway notes[]

  • I-271 and I-480 are the only two three-digit interstates in the nation to be concurrent, near Bedford Heights in Cuyahoga County.

Public transit[]

The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority operates a bus system and heavy and light rail in Cuyahoga County. Other transit agencies serve the surrounding counties and provide connections with RTA, including Laketran in Lake County, Metro in Summit County, PARTA in Portage County, SARTA in Stark County, and Lorain County Transit in Lorain County.

Culture[]

Theater[]

In addition to Playhouse Square Center, the second largest theater district in the United States, Greater Cleveland has a vibrant theater community throughout the region.

Theaters[]

Theatrical companies[]

  • Bad Epitaph Theater Company (defunct)
  • The Bang and Clatter Theatre Company
  • Beck Center for the Arts
  • Bodwin Theater Company[27]
  • Carousel Dinner Theater[28] (defunct)
  • Charenton Theatre Company[29]
  • Cleveland Shakespeare Festival[30]
  • Cleveland Signstage Theatre
  • Cleveland Theatre Company (defunct)
  • Convergence-Continuum[31]
  • Dobama's Night Kitchen (defunct)
  • Fairmount Center for the Arts (Mayfield Village Performing Arts Center)[32]
  • Fourth Wall Productions[33]
  • Knot Theater (defunct)
  • Giant Portions (defunct)
  • Great Lakes Theater Festival[34]
  • Ground Floor Theater & Improv (defunct)
  • The Group[35]
  • Pieces of People (POP) Theatre (defunct)
  • Portage Lakes Players[36]
  • The Public Squares[37]
  • Red Hen Productions[38]
  • SPOT Improv Comedy Troupe (defunct)
  • the Working Theatre (defunct)

Sports and recreation[]

Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians

Cleveland's professional sports teams include the Cleveland Indians (Major League Baseball), Cleveland Browns (National Football League), and Cleveland Cavaliers (National Basketball Association). The Indians have two minor league affiliates in the area, the AA Akron Aeros and the Single-A Lake County Captains, who play in Eastlake. Additionally, there is an independent baseball team, the Lake Erie Crushers, in Avon.

Minor league hockey is represented in the area by the Lake Erie Monsters of the American Hockey League. They began play in the 2007–08 AHL season at the Quicken Loans Arena. The team is the minor league affiliate of the Colorado Avalanche of the NHL.

Motorsports venues in the region include Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington and Summit Motorsports Park in Norwalk, a major NHRA venue.

The Cleveland Metroparks are a system of nature preserves that encircle the city, and the Cuyahoga Valley National Park encompasses the Cuyahoga River valley between Cleveland and Akron. The region is home to Mentor Headlands Beach, the longest natural beach on the Great Lakes.

Famous natives[]

  • Avant
  • Albert Ayler
  • Jim Backus
  • Kaye Ballard
  • LeCharles Bentley
  • Halle Berry
  • Chris Butler
  • Eric Carmen
  • Drew Carey
  • Mary Carey
  • Ray Cash
  • Drew Carter
  • Gerald Casale
  • Chris Chambers
  • Tracy Chapman
  • Tim Conway
  • Wes Craven
  • Kid Cudi
  • Dorothy Dandridge
  • Cheri Dennis
  • Ruby Dee
  • Donald DeFreeze
  • Phil Donahue
  • Stephen R. Donaldson
  • Harlan Ellison
  • Lee Evans
  • James A. Garfield
  • Sonny Geraci
  • Donald A. Glaser
  • Ted Ginn Jr.
  • Bob Golic
  • Mike Golic
  • Anthony Gonzalez
  • Jim Graner
  • Joel Grey
  • Arsenio Hall
  • Roy Hall
  • Margaret Hamilton
  • Steve Harvey
  • Patricia Heaton
  • Anne Heche
  • John W. Heisman
  • Kim Herring
  • Hal Holbrook
  • Bob Hope
  • Langston Hughes
  • Chrissie Hynde
  • LeBron James
  • Philip Johnson
  • Joe Jurevicius
  • Sammy Kaye
  • Don King
  • Bobby Knight
  • Heather Kozar
  • Dennis Kucinich
  • Dante Lavelli
  • Mike Lebowitz
  • Gerald Levert
  • D. A. Levy
  • Bob Lewis
  • Peter B. Lewis
  • Jim Lovell
  • Henry Mancini
  • Scott Mescudi
  • O.J. McDuffie
  • Burgess Meredith
  • Toni Morrison
  • Bob Mothersbaugh
  • Mark Mothersbaugh
  • Paul Newman
  • Urban Meyer
  • Chuck Noll
  • Andre Norton
  • Charles Oakley
  • Jesse Owens
  • Harvey Pekar
  • Dave Ragone
  • Trent Reznor
  • John Rockefeller
  • Michael Ruhlman
  • Screamin' Jay Hawkins
  • Molly Shannon
  • Sam Sheppard
  • Don Shula
  • Jerry Siegel
  • Robert Smith
  • Troy Smith
  • Ruth Simpson
  • Steve Stone
  • George Steinbrenner
  • Carl B. Stokes
  • Michael Symon
  • Jim Tressel
  • George Voinovich
  • Carl E. Walz
  • Lew Wasserman
  • Debra Winger
  • Archibald Willard
  • Fred Willard
  • Frank Yankovic
  • Roger Zelazny

See also[]

  • List of United States metropolitan statistical areas by population
  • Rust Belt

References[]

  1. ^ "American FactFinder2". http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml. Retrieved 2010-03-20. 
  2. ^ Cleveland Plus: Northeast Ohio Counties. Retrieved September 20, 2010.
  3. ^ "Congressman Dennis Kucinich". Kucinich.house.gov. http://kucinich.house.gov/Issues/Issue/?IssueID=1571. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  4. ^ H.R.2439, 106th United States Congress
  5. ^ Lin-Fisher, Betty (October 31, 2003). "CALL FOR MORE TELEPHONE NUMBERS ANSWERED - 234 AREA CODE CONNECTED MOST PEOPLE ARE STILL BEING ASSIGNED 330 NUMBERS". Akron Beacon Journal (Knight Ridder): p. D1. http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/InfoWeb?p_product=NewsBank&p_theme=aggregated5&p_action=doc&p_docid=0FE8E517C5F41E33&p_docnum=1&p_queryname=2. 
  6. ^ Colleen Mulcahy, "Benefits administrator blasts health mandates. (John Polk)", National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management, Oct. 14, 1991.
  7. ^ Shannon Mortland, "COSE to help push ideas for reforming health care.(Health Care)(Council of Smaller Enterprises)(Brief Article)", Crain's Cleveland Business, Aug. 8, 2005.
  8. ^ "GROWING GREENER GOOD FOR BUSINESS GROUP HOPING TO FIND NEW WAYS TO TURN WASTE MATERIAL INTO PROFIT", Akron Beacon Journal (OH), May 5, 2008.
  9. ^ "Making Change: Sustainable Businesses", 90.3 WCPN ideastream, Wednesday, May 28, 2003.
  10. ^ "Actors' Summit - A Professional Theater Located in Hudson, Ohio". Actorssummit.org. 2010-05-07. http://actorssummit.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  11. ^ http://auroracommunitytheare.com/
  12. ^ "destinationdowntownakron.com". destinationdowntownakron.com. http://web.archive.org/web/20070208125343/www.akroncivic.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  13. ^ "Virtual Akron- Highland Theater". 2002. http://www.virtualakron.com/highlandtheater/. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  14. ^ "Beck Center for the Arts". Lkwdpl.org. 2010-01-03. http://www.lkwdpl.org/beck/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  15. ^ "Something Dada Improvisational Comedy". Cabaretdada.com. http://www.cabaretdada.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ "Cleveland Play House". Cleveland Play House. http://www.clevelandplayhouse.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  18. ^ Pavlish Group: Jason Maxwell / Don Pavlish. "Cleveland Public Theatre ~ Home". Cptonline.org. http://www.cptonline.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  19. ^ "Dobama Theatre - Cleveland's Contemporary Stage". Dobama.org. 2010-06-05. http://www.dobama.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  20. ^ [2]
  21. ^ "Bay Village, Ohio". Huntington Playhouse. 2010-07-14. http://www.huntingtonplayhouse.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  22. ^ Karamu House website
  23. ^ "Near West Theatre". Near West Theatre. http://nearwesttheatre.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  24. ^ Rick Evans. "Olde Towne Hall Theatre". Olde Towne Hall Theatre. http://www.oldetownehalltheatre.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  25. ^ Canton Palace Theatre (2003-07-30). "Canton Palace Theatre". Canton Palace Theatre. http://www.cantonpalacetheatre.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  26. ^ "Home". PlayhouseSquare. http://www.playhousesquare.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  27. ^ "Bodwin Theatre Company". Bodwin_theatre.tripod.com. http://bodwin_theatre.tripod.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  28. ^ "Carousel Current Shows". Carouseldinnertheatre.com. http://carouseldinnertheatre.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  29. ^ "Charenton Theater Company". Charenton.org. http://www.charenton.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  30. ^ "Cleveland Shakespeare Festival". Cleveshakes.org. http://www.cleveshakes.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  31. ^ "Convergence Continuum". Convergence Continuum. http://www.convergence-continuum.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  32. ^ "Fairmount Center for the Arts". Fairmountcenter.org. http://www.fairmountcenter.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  33. ^ "INDEX". Fourthwallproductions.com. http://www.fourthwallproductions.com. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  34. ^ "Great Lakes Theater Festival". Greatlakestheater.org. http://www.greatlakestheater.org/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  35. ^ [3]
  36. ^ [4]
  37. ^ "The Public Squares". The Public Squares. http://thepublicsquares.com/. Retrieved 2010-08-01. 
  38. ^ [5]

External links[]

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