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Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania
Jacks Mountain as viewed from Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania.jpg
Jacks Mountain viewed from Shirleysburg
Seal of Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania
Seal
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Huntingdon County
Location in the state of Pennsylvania
Map of the U.S. highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Founded September 20, 1787
Named for Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon
Seat Huntingdon
Largest borough Huntingdon
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

889 sq mi (2,302 km²)
875 sq mi (2,266 km²)
15 sq mi (39 km²), 1.6
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

44,092
51/sq mi (20/km²)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.huntingdoncounty.net/Pages/default.aspx

Huntingdon County is a county located in the center of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 44,092.[1] Its county seat is Huntingdon.[2] The county was created on September 20, 1787, mainly from the north part of Bedford County, plus an addition of territory on the east (Big Valley, Tuscarora Valley) from Cumberland County.

Huntingdon County comprises the Huntingdon, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 889 square miles (2,300 km2), of which 875 square miles (2,270 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (1.6%) is water.[3] It has a humid continental climate (Dfa/Dfb) and average monthly temperatures in Huntingdon borough range from 27.8 °F in January to 72.3 °F in July. [1]

Features[]

  • Raystown Lake
  • Tussey Mountain

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 7,558
1800 13,008 72.1%
1810 14,778 13.6%
1820 20,142 36.3%
1830 27,145 34.8%
1840 35,484 30.7%
1850 24,786 −30.1%
1860 28,100 13.4%
1870 31,251 11.2%
1880 33,954 8.6%
1890 35,751 5.3%
1900 34,650 −3.1%
1910 38,304 10.5%
1920 39,848 4.0%
1930 39,021 −2.1%
1940 41,836 7.2%
1950 40,872 −2.3%
1960 39,457 −3.5%
1970 39,108 −0.9%
1980 42,253 8.0%
1990 44,164 4.5%
2000 45,586 3.2%
2010 45,913 0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1790-1960[5] 1900-1990[6]
1990-2000[7] 2010-2020[1]

As of the census[8] of 2010, there were 45,913 people and 17,280 households within the county. The population density was 52 people per square mile (20/km2). There were 22,365 housing units at an average density of 24 per square mile (9/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.50% White, 5.21% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.87% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 1.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 33.9% were of German, 17.1% American, 11.1% Irish, 7.5% English and 5.7% Italian ancestry.

There were 16,759 households, out of which 30.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.10% were married couples living together, 8.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.60% were non-families. 25.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.70% under the age of 18, 10.10% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 109.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 110.20 males.

Almost everyone that lives in Huntingdon County speaks English as their first language. The dominant form of speech in Huntingdon County is the Central Pennsylvania accent of English. In some areas of the county, such as Kishacoquillas Valley, where many Amish and Mennonite people live, a dialect of German known as Pennsylvania Dutch (from Deutsch, the word for German) is commonly spoken.

Micropolitan Statistical Area[]

The United States Office of Management and Budget[9] has designated Huntingdon County as the Huntingdon, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (µSA).[10] As of the 2010 census[11] the micropolitan area ranked 11th most populous in the State of Pennsylvania and the 249th most populous in the United States with a population of 45,913.

Law and government[]

United States presidential election results for Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 17,061 74.69% 5,445 23.84% 337 1.48%
2016 14,494 72.96% 4,539 22.85% 833 4.19%
2012 11,979 67.71% 5,409 30.57% 304 1.72%
2008 11,745 62.70% 6,621 35.35% 365 1.95%
2004 12,126 67.15% 5,879 32.56% 53 0.29%
2000 10,408 65.21% 5,073 31.78% 480 3.01%
1996 7,324 50.53% 5,285 36.46% 1,886 13.01%
1992 7,249 46.17% 5,153 32.82% 3,298 21.01%
1988 8,800 64.56% 4,752 34.86% 79 0.58%
1984 10,220 69.57% 4,430 30.15% 41 0.28%
1980 8,140 58.44% 5,094 36.57% 694 4.98%
1976 7,843 58.26% 5,410 40.19% 209 1.55%
1972 9,606 72.68% 3,394 25.68% 216 1.63%
1968 8,276 61.82% 4,128 30.83% 984 7.35%
1964 6,571 46.81% 7,435 52.96% 33 0.24%
1960 11,116 70.07% 4,710 29.69% 38 0.24%
1956 9,698 67.66% 4,618 32.22% 17 0.12%
1952 9,580 68.61% 4,318 30.93% 64 0.46%
1948 6,943 67.76% 3,304 32.24% 0 0.00%
1944 8,106 65.80% 4,131 33.53% 83 0.67%
1940 9,141 61.64% 5,631 37.97% 58 0.39%
1936 9,815 56.43% 7,429 42.72% 148 0.85%
1932 7,371 66.39% 3,426 30.86% 306 2.76%
1928 9,920 86.25% 1,470 12.78% 112 0.97%
1924 6,567 73.99% 1,488 16.77% 820 9.24%
1920 5,232 67.74% 1,784 23.10% 708 9.17%
1916 3,806 60.23% 2,181 34.51% 332 5.25%
1912 903 14.33% 1,538 24.41% 3,859 61.25%
1908 4,503 66.34% 1,917 28.24% 368 5.42%
1904 4,587 73.11% 1,324 21.10% 363 5.79%
1900 4,645 67.91% 1,989 29.08% 206 3.01%
1896 4,969 66.06% 2,305 30.64% 248 3.30%
1892 3,994 57.66% 2,675 38.62% 258 3.72%
1888 4,217 58.56% 2,789 38.73% 195 2.71%
1884 3,913 54.39% 2,908 40.42% 373 5.18%
1880 3,787 52.36% 3,039 42.02% 407 5.63%



County Commissioners[]

  • Mark Sather (chair) (R)
  • Scott Walls (R)
  • Jeffrey Thomas (D)

State Senate[13][]

  • Judy Ward, Republican, Pennsylvania's 30th Senatorial District
  • Jake Corman, Republican, Pennsylvania's 34th Senatorial District

State House of Representatives[13][]

  • Rich Irvin, Republican, Pennsylvania's 81st Representative District

United States House of Representatives[]

  • John Joyce, Republican, Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district

United States Senate[]

  • Pat Toomey, Republican
  • Bob Casey Jr., Democrat

Education[]

Map of Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania School Districts

Public school districts[]

  • Huntingdon Area School District
  • Juniata Valley School District
  • Mount Union Area School District (also in Mifflin County)
  • Southern Huntingdon County School District
  • Tussey Mountain School District (also in Bedford County)
  • Tyrone Area School District (also in Blair and Centre Counties)

Related entities[]

  • Huntingdon County Career and Technology Center: Mill Creek
  • Tuscarora Intermediate Unit 11

Charter schools[]

  • New Day Charter School (7–12): Huntingdon
  • Stone Valley Community Charter School (K–5): McAlevy's Fort

Private schools[]

  • Calvary Christian Academy: Huntingdon
  • Class School: Mill Creek
  • Grier School: Birmingham
  • Huntingdon Christian Academy: Huntingdon
  • Huntingdon County Child & Adult Development Center
  • Meadow Green Mennonite School: Three Springs
  • Shavers Creek Christian School: Petersburg
  • Tiny Tots Childcare and Learning Center: Shade Gap
  • West Penn F Grace Brethren: Saxton
  • Woodcock Valley Center on Children: Huntingdon

Colleges and universities[]

  • Juniata College, a small, independent liberal arts college, is located in the county seat of Huntingdon.
  • DuBois Business College, Huntingdon County campus, located in the former Huntingdon High School building in the borough of Huntingdon.
  • Pennsylvania Highlands Community College, Huntingdon center (located in Walker Township)

Libraries[]

  • Huntingdon County Library
  • Memorial Public Library of the Borough of Alexandria
  • Mount Union Community Library

Transportation[]

Major highways[]

  • Template:Jct/2
  • US 22
  • US 522
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 26]]
  • Template:Jct/banner/SH
    [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA-Truck|Template:Infobox road/PA/abbrev PA-Truck]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 35]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 45]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 103]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 305]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 350]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 453]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 475]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 550]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 641]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 655]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 747]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 829]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 913]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 994]]

Media[]

Radio stations[]

AM[]

  • ESPN RADIO 1150 AM: Huntingdon (Sports)
  • WIEZ 670 AM: Lewistown (News/Talk)
  • WMAJ 1450 AM: State College (Sports)
  • WVAM 1430 AM: Altoona (Sports)
  • WFBG 1290 AM: Altoona (News/Talk)
  • WKMC 1370 AM: Roaring Spring (Nostalgia)
  • WRTA 1240 AM: Altoona (News/Talk)
  • WRSC 1390 AM: State College (News/Talk)
  • WBLF 970 AM: Bellefonte (News/Talk)
  • WPHB 1260 AM: Philipsburg (Country)
  • WKVA 920 AM: Burnham (Oldies)
  • WHP 580 AM: Harrisburg (News/Talk)
  • KDKA 1020 AM: Pittsburgh (heard much better at night) (News/Talk)
  • WWVA 1170 AM: Wheeling, West Virginia- (heard much better at night) (News/Talk/Country)
  • WGY 810 AM: Schenectady, New York (heard much better at night) (News/Talk)

FM[]

  • WHUN 103.5 FM: Huntingdon (Oldies)
  • WDBF 106.3 FM: Selinsgrove (Country)
  • WKVR 92.3 FM: Huntingdon (College)
  • W273BE 102.5 FM: Huntingdon (Public Radio)
  • WFGY 98.1 FM: Altoona (Country)
  • WFGE 101.1 FM: Tyrone (Country)
  • WBUS 93.7 FM: State College (Classic Rock)
  • WWOT 100.1 FM: Altoona (Top 40)
  • WJOW 105.9 FM: Philipsburg (Country)
  • WSKE 104.3 FM: Everett (Country)
  • WJSM 92.7 FM: Martinsburg (Religious)
  • WHPA 93.5 FM: Gallitzin (Oldies)
  • WBRX 94.7 FM: Cresson (Adult Contemporary)
  • WRXV 89.1 FM: State College (Christian Contemporary)
  • WTLR 89.9 FM: State College (Religious)
  • WRKY 104.9 FM: Hollidaysburg (Classic Rock)
  • WRKW 99.1 FM: Ebensburg (Classic Rock)
  • WFGI 95.5 FM: Johnstown (Country)
  • WVNW 96.7 FM: Burnham (Country)
  • WCHX 105.5 FM: Burnham (Classic Rock)
  • WQWK 103.1 FM: State College (Classic Rock)
  • WLTS 99.5 FM: Centre Hall (Classic Hits)
  • WPSU 91.5 FM: State College (Public Radio)

Newspapers[]

Television[]

Communities[]

Map of Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Boroughs (red) and Townships (white).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs and townships are located in Huntingdon County:

Boroughs[]

  • Alexandria
  • Birmingham
  • Broad Top City
  • Cassville
  • Coalmont
  • Dudley
  • Huntingdon (county seat)
  • Mapleton
  • Marklesburg
  • Mill Creek
  • Mount Union
  • Orbisonia
  • Petersburg
  • Rockhill
  • Saltillo
  • Shade Gap
  • Shirleysburg
  • Three Springs

Townships[]

  • Barree
  • Brady
  • Carbon
  • Cass
  • Clay
  • Cromwell
  • Dublin
  • Franklin
  • Henderson
  • Hopewell
  • Jackson
  • Juniata
  • Lincoln
  • Logan
  • Miller
  • Morris
  • Oneida
  • Penn
  • Porter
  • Shirley
  • Smithfield
  • Springfield
  • Spruce Creek
  • Tell
  • Todd
  • Union
  • Walker
  • Warriors Mark
  • West
  • Wood

Census-designated places[]

  • Allenport
  • McConnellstown

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Entriken
  • Calvin

Population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Huntingdon County.[11]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Huntingdon Borough 7,093
2 Mount Union Borough 2,447
3 McConnellstown CDP 1,194
4 Allenport CDP 648
5 Petersburg Borough 480
6 Broad Top City Borough 452
7 Three Springs Borough 444
8 Mapleton Borough 441
9 Orbisonia Borough 428
10 Rockhill Borough 371
T-11 Alexandria Borough 346
T-11 Saltillo Borough 346
12 Mill Creek Borough 328
13 Marklesburg Borough 204
14 Dudley Borough 184
15 Shirleysburg Borough 150
16 Cassville Borough 143
17 Coalmont Borough 106
18 Shade Gap Borough 105
19 Birmingham Borough 90

Notable natives[]

  • Dylan Lane (born 1977), game show host (hosted Chain Reaction) (born in Tyrone, Blair County, spent whole life in Huntingdon)
  • Isabel Stewart North (1860-1929), composer
  • Robert Elliott Speer (1867–1947), American religious leader
  • Martin Grove Brumbaugh (1862–1930), 26th Governor of Pennsylvania
  • Horace Porter (1837–1921), Civil War general and US diplomat
  • John Purdue (born October 31, 1802, in Huntingdon County), primary original benefactor of Purdue University
  • Hugh Brady (born July 29, 1768, in Standingstone), U.S. Army general

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/42/42061.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_42.txt. 
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  5. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  6. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/pa190090.txt. 
  7. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  9. ^ "Office of Management and Budget". https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb. 
  10. ^ "Archived copy". https://www.census.gov/econ/census/media/forms/pa.html. 
  11. ^ a b "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html. 
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  13. ^ a b Center, Legislativate Data Processing. "Find Your Legislator" (in en). http://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/legis/home/findyourlegislator/county_list.cfm?CNTYLIST=Huntingdon. 
  14. ^ "May 2, 2018 - The Daily News serving Huntingdon, Mount Union, Orbisonia, and Saxton PA". http://www.huntingdondailynews.com. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 40°25′N 77°59′W / 40.41, -77.98

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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