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Kenosha County, Wisconsin
Kenosha County Court House.jpg
Kenosha County Courthouse and Jail
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Kenosha County
Location in the state of Wisconsin
Map of the U.S. highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location in the U.S.
Founded 1850
Seat Kenosha
Largest city Kenosha
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

754 sq mi (1,953 km²)
272 sq mi (704 km²)
482 sq mi (1,248 km²), 64%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

169,151
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.kenosha.wi.us

Kenosha County is located in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 169,151 as of the 2020 census, making it the eighth most populous county in Wisconsin.[1] The county is named after the county seat, Kenosha,[2] the fourth largest city in Wisconsin.[1] Kenosha County is part of the Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL-IN-WI Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is on the west shore of Lake Michigan.

The county has traditionally attracted newcomers from suburban Chicago, and in March 2008 the demographers of the Wisconsin Department of Administration reported that Kenosha County's improvements in roads, business's need for personnel, and quality-of-life factors had contributed to a decades-long influx of Illinois transplants, along with the direct rail link to Chicago via Metra's Union Pacific / North Line. Since 2000, the county saw a population increase of 12.6%, higher than the overall state growth of 6.0%.[3]

Considered an exurb, Kenosha County continued to see growth during the COVID-19 pandemic as people relocated from nearby cities such as Chicago and Milwaukee.[4]

History[]

The Potowatomi inhabited the area that would become Kenosha County for centuries prior to the acquisition of the area in 1833. The city of Kenosha was founded in 1835, and Kenosha County was formed from Racine County in 1850. Its location led to development and factories being built in the 19th century. Manufacturing continued to be a key component of the economy into the 20th century.[5]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 754 square miles (1,950 km2), of which 272 square miles (700 km2) is land and 482 square miles (1,250 km2) (64%) is water.[6] Although the county contains area from Lake Michigan, it is the fourth-smallest county in Wisconsin by land area.[7]

Major highways[]

  • I-41.svg Interstate 41
  • I-94.svg Interstate 94
  • US 41.svg U.S. Highway 41 (Skokie Highway)
  • US 45.svg U.S. Highway 45
  • WIS 31.svg Highway 31 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 32.svg Highway 32 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 50.svg Highway 50 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 75.svg Highway 75 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 83.svg Highway 83 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 142.svg Highway 142 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 158.svg Highway 158 (Wisconsin)
  • WIS 165.svg Highway 165 (Wisconsin)

Airport[]

Kenosha Regional Airport (KENW) serves the county and surrounding communities.

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 10,734
1860 13,900 29.5%
1870 13,147 −5.4%
1880 13,550 3.1%
1890 15,581 15.0%
1900 21,707 39.3%
1910 32,929 51.7%
1920 51,284 55.7%
1930 63,277 23.4%
1940 63,505 0.4%
1950 75,238 18.5%
1960 100,615 33.7%
1970 117,917 17.2%
1980 123,137 4.4%
1990 128,181 4.1%
2000 149,577 16.7%
2010 166,426 11.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2020[12]

2020 census[13]

2000 Census Age Pyramid for Kenosha County

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 149,577 people, 56,057 households, and 38,455 families residing in the county. The population density was 548 people per square mile (212/km2). There were 59,989 housing units at an average density of 220 per square mile (85/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 88.38% White, 5.08% Black or African American, 0.38% Native American, 0.92% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 3.29% from other races, and 1.91% from two or more races. 7.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 28.8% were of German, 10.4% Italian, 7.9% Irish, 7.6% Polish and 7.5% English ancestry.

There were 56,057 households, out of which 34.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.70% were married couples living together, 11.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.40% were non-families. 25.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.10% under the age of 18, 9.40% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 20.70% from 45 to 64, and 11.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.30 males.

In 2017, there were 1,873 births, giving a general fertility rate of 55.7 births per 1000 women aged 15–44, the 13th lowest rate out of all 72 Wisconsin counties.[15]

Government[]

The county legislature is known as the Board of Supervisors. It consists of 23 members, each elected from single-member districts. The county executive is elected in a spring countywide, nonpartisan vote. The county executive is James Kreuser. The district attorney, treasurer, clerk, and register of deeds are elected in fall countywide, partisan elections held in presidential years, while the sheriff and clerk of circuit court are elected in fall countywide, partisan elections held in gubernatorial years.

Politics[]

In presidential elections, Kenosha County has voted Democratic for most of the past century. In 2016, Donald Trump became the first Republican presidential candidate to win the county since President Nixon in 1972. Trump won it again in 2020, this time with an outright majority of the vote, marking the first consecutive victories for the GOP in Kenosha County since 1928.

United States presidential election results for Kenosha County, Wisconsin[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 44,972 50.68% 42,193 47.55% 1,573 1.77%
2016 36,037 47.23% 35,799 46.92% 4,468 5.86%
2012 34,977 43.24% 44,867 55.46% 1,053 1.30%
2008 31,609 40.12% 45,836 58.18% 1,344 1.71%
2004 35,587 46.56% 40,107 52.48% 734 0.96%
2000 28,891 45.35% 32,429 50.90% 2,389 3.75%
1996 18,296 34.06% 27,964 52.06% 7,457 13.88%
1992 19,854 32.11% 27,341 44.21% 14,642 23.68%
1988 21,661 41.55% 30,089 57.72% 379 0.73%
1984 26,118 46.89% 29,233 52.49% 344 0.62%
1980 24,481 43.82% 26,738 47.86% 4,644 8.31%
1976 22,349 43.61% 27,585 53.82% 1,316 2.57%
1972 24,041 53.93% 19,441 43.61% 1,094 2.45%
1968 17,089 40.57% 21,427 50.86% 3,610 8.57%
1964 14,764 32.55% 30,522 67.29% 70 0.15%
1960 19,969 46.43% 22,956 53.37% 86 0.20%
1956 21,367 55.08% 17,094 44.06% 335 0.86%
1952 18,917 48.72% 19,768 50.91% 142 0.37%
1948 12,780 39.80% 17,987 56.02% 1,342 4.18%
1944 12,436 39.96% 18,325 58.88% 360 1.16%
1940 12,182 40.91% 17,174 57.68% 421 1.41%
1936 7,268 26.68% 18,137 66.57% 1,840 6.75%
1932 7,307 30.57% 14,373 60.13% 2,223 9.30%
1928 11,330 50.66% 10,638 47.57% 395 1.77%
1924 10,341 55.45% 1,517 8.13% 6,791 36.41%
1920 9,791 77.81% 1,724 13.70% 1,069 8.49%
1916 3,537 50.99% 2,813 40.55% 587 8.46%
1912 1,671 27.21% 2,216 36.09% 2,254 36.70%
1908 3,409 54.50% 2,006 32.07% 840 13.43%
1904 3,293 60.86% 1,592 29.42% 526 9.72%
1900 3,078 58.37% 2,101 39.84% 94 1.78%
1896 2,827 60.54% 1,732 37.09% 111 2.38%
1892 1,628 44.71% 1,928 52.95% 85 2.33%



Communities[]

City[]

Villages[]

Towns[]

  • Brighton
  • Paris
  • Randall
  • Somers
  • Wheatland

Census-designated places[]

  • Camp Lake
  • Lily Lake
  • Powers Lake
  • Wilmot

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Bassett
  • Benet Lake
  • Berryville
  • Brighton
  • Central Park
  • Chapin
  • Fox River
  • Kellogg's Corners
  • Klondike
  • Lake Shangrila
  • Liberty Corners
  • New Munster
  • Paris
  • Salem Oaks
  • Salem
  • Trevor
  • Voltz Lake

Ghost towns/neighborhoods[]

  • Aurora

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Kenosha County, Wisconsin

Notes[]

References[]

  1. ^ a b "Archived copy". https://doa.wi.gov/DIR/Final_Ests_Summary_2017.pdf. 
  2. ^ "Here's How Iron Got Its Name". The Rhinelander Daily News: p. 2. June 16, 1932. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/909510/wisconsin_county_names/.  open access
  3. ^ "Kenosha County is growing". Kenosha Area Business Alliance. https://kaba.org/locate-expand/county-profile/#:~:text=Kenosha%20County%20is%20growing,percent%20and%209.7%20percent%20respectively.. 
  4. ^ Winck, Ben (August 1, 2021). "Forget the suburbs, the 'exurbs' are the place to be". Business Insider. https://www.businessinsider.com/moving-from-suburbs-to-exurbs-pandemic-relocation-where-to-move-2021-7. 
  5. ^ WHS Library Archives Staff (16 August 2012). "A Brief History of Kenosha, Wisconsin". https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Article/CS2535. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_55.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Kenosha County, Wisconsin" (in en). https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/geo/chart/kenoshacountywisconsin/LND110210. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/wi190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/55/55059.html. 
  13. ^ https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/kenoshacountywisconsin,US/PST045219
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  15. ^ "Annual Wisconsin Birth and Infant Mortality Report, 2017 P-01161-19 (June 2019): Detailed Tables". https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/publication/p01161-2019-tb.xlsx. 
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  • Forstall, Richard L. (editor) (1996). Population of states and counties of the United States: 1790 to 1990 : from the twenty-one decennial censuses. United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Population Division. ISBN 0-934213-48-8. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 42°35′N 87°49′W / 42.58, -87.81


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Kenosha County, Wisconsin. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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