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King and Queen County, Virginia
KING AND QUEEN COURTHOUSE GREEN HISTORIC DISTRICT.jpg
Old King and Queen County Courthouse
Seal of King and Queen County, Virginia
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting King and Queen County
Location in the state of Virginia
Map of the U.S. highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1691
Named for William III and Mary II of England
Seat King and Queen Court House
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

326 sq mi (844 km²)
315 sq mi (816 km²)
11 sq mi (28 km²), 3.4
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

6,608
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.kingandqueenco.net

King and Queen County is a county in the U.S. state of Virginia, located in the state's Middle Peninsula on the eastern edge of the Richmond, VA metropolitan area. As of the 2020 census, the population was 6,608.[1] Its county seat is King and Queen Court House.[2]

History[]

King and Queen County was established in 1691 from New Kent County. The county is named for King William III and Queen Mary II of England.[3] King and Queen County is notable as one of the few counties in the United States to have recorded a larger population in the 1790 census than in the 2010 one.

Among the earliest settlers of King and Queen County was Roger Shackelford, an English emigrant from Old Alresford, Hampshire, after whom the county's village of Shacklefords is named. Shackelford's descendants continued to live in the county, and by the nineteenth century had intermarried with several local families, including Taliaferro, Beverley, Thornton, and Sears.[4]

In 1762 when he was 11, future president James Madison was sent to a boarding school run by Donald Robertson at the Innes plantation in King and Queen County. Robertson was a Scottish teacher who tutored numerous prominent plantation families in the South. From Robertson, Madison learned mathematics, geography, and modern and classical languages—he became especially proficient in Latin. He attributed his instinct for learning "largely to that man (Robertson)."[5][6] At age 16, Madison returned to his father's Montpelier estate in Orange County.

On March 2, 1864, the Battle of Walkerton, an engagement of the American Civil War took place here, resulting in a Confederate victory.

Virginia Longest, national director of Nursing Service for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, was a county native.

Richard and Mildred Loving lived in a remote part of the county, hoping to avoid arrest by the authorities while their legal challenge to Virginia's anti-miscegenation laws moved through the courts.

For many years, county publications noted that the county lacked any traffic lights. This is now no longer the case, as a traffic light has been installed on U.S. Route 360 at St. Stephen's Church.

Even in the 21st century, King and Queen County contains no incorporated towns or cities, and remains one of Virginia's most sparsely-populated counties.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 326 square miles (840 km2), of which 315 square miles (820 km2) is land and 11 square miles (28 km2) (3.4%) is water.[7]

Measuring 72 miles in length, it is known as the longest county in the state of Virginia. Although it is long in length, it extremely narrow measuring less that 20 miles wide.

Adjacent Counties[]

Major Highways[]

  • US 360
  • SR 14
  • SR 33
  • SR 40

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 9,377
1800 9,879 5.4%
1810 10,988 11.2%
1820 11,798 7.4%
1830 11,644 −1.3%
1840 10,862 −6.7%
1850 10,319 −5.0%
1860 10,328 0.1%
1870 9,709 −6.0%
1880 10,502 8.2%
1890 9,669 −7.9%
1900 9,265 −4.2%
1910 9,576 3.4%
1920 9,161 −4.3%
1930 7,618 −16.8%
1940 6,954 −8.7%
1950 6,299 −9.4%
1960 5,889 −6.5%
1970 5,491 −6.8%
1980 5,968 8.7%
1990 6,289 5.4%
2000 6,630 5.4%
2010 6,945 4.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010[12] 2020[13]

2020 census[]

King and Queen County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[12] Pop 2020[13] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 4,547 4,460 65.47% 67.49%
Black or African American alone (NH) 1,970 1,561 28.37% 23.62%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 109 82 1.57% 1.24%
Asian alone (NH) 17 23 0.24% 0.35%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 3 0.00% 0.05%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 7 19 0.10% 0.29%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 111 278 1.60% 4.21%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 184 182 2.65% 2.75%
Total 6,945 6,608 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census[]

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 6,630 people, 2,673 households, and 1,897 families residing in the county. The population density was 21 people per square mile (8/km2). There were 3,010 housing units at an average density of 10 per square mile (4/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 61.22% White, 35.67% Black or African American, 1.42% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. 0.87% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,673 households, out of which 26.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.60% were married couples living together, 13.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.00% were non-families. 24.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.70% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 27.00% from 45 to 64, and 16.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,941, and the median income for a family was $40,563. Males had a median income of $33,217 versus $21,753 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,236. 10.90% of the population and 7.80% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 8.10% are under the age of 18 and 14.80% are 65 or older.

Government[]

Board of Supervisors[]

  • Buena Vista District: James M. Burns
  • Newtown District: Sherrin C. Alsop (I)
  • Shanghai District: R.F. "Rusty" Bailey, Jr. (I)
  • St. Stephens Church District: James Lawrence Simpkins (I)
  • Stevensville District: Doris H. Morris (I)

Constitutional officers[]

  • Clerk of the Circuit Court: Vanessa D. Porter
  • Commissioner of the Revenue: Kelly N. Lumpkin(I)
  • Commonwealth's Attorney: Meredith D. Adkins
  • Sheriff: John R. Charboneau
  • Treasurer: Irene B. Longest

King and Queen is represented by Republican Thomas K. "Tommy" Norment in the Virginia Senate, Republican M. Keith Hodges in the Virginia House of Delegates, and Republican Robert J. "Rob" Wittman in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Presidentially, King and Queen County is a bellwether county of sorts. It correctly predicted the winner of all but four presidential elections between 1928 and 2020, only voting for losing candidates in 1968, 1980, and 2012, and 2020.

United States presidential election results for King and Queen County, Virginia[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 2,450 59.54% 1,590 38.64% 75 1.82%
2016 2,099 56.88% 1,468 39.78% 123 3.33%
2012 1,865 51.03% 1,745 47.74% 45 1.23%
2008 1,763 47.58% 1,918 51.77% 24 0.65%
2004 1,737 52.86% 1,506 45.83% 43 1.31%
2000 1,423 49.77% 1,387 48.51% 49 1.71%
1996 1,073 38.93% 1,393 50.54% 290 10.52%
1992 1,206 41.34% 1,363 46.73% 348 11.93%
1988 1,376 50.46% 1,309 48.00% 42 1.54%
1984 1,449 54.39% 1,201 45.08% 14 0.53%
1980 949 44.14% 1,128 52.47% 73 3.40%
1976 778 39.06% 1,111 55.77% 103 5.17%
1972 1,033 58.30% 708 39.95% 31 1.75%
1968 568 27.40% 882 42.55% 623 30.05%
1964 699 46.94% 786 52.79% 4 0.27%
1960 432 43.95% 536 54.53% 15 1.53%
1956 495 54.64% 289 31.90% 122 13.47%
1952 415 51.23% 387 47.78% 8 0.99%
1948 171 31.26% 293 53.56% 83 15.17%
1944 166 31.38% 363 68.62% 0 0.00%
1940 124 25.31% 365 74.49% 1 0.20%
1936 124 24.95% 372 74.85% 1 0.20%
1932 154 28.79% 368 68.79% 13 2.43%
1928 319 53.26% 280 46.74% 0 0.00%
1924 134 29.65% 314 69.47% 4 0.88%
1920 181 34.28% 347 65.72% 0 0.00%
1916 127 31.91% 271 68.09% 0 0.00%
1912 68 18.78% 246 67.96% 48 13.26%
1908 181 34.02% 349 65.60% 2 0.38%
1904 134 25.57% 390 74.43% 0 0.00%
1900 614 43.48% 796 56.37% 2 0.14%
1896 655 43.21% 853 56.27% 8 0.53%
1892 527 46.89% 564 50.18% 33 2.94%
1888 829 46.39% 958 53.61% 0 0.00%
1884 926 49.81% 933 50.19% 0 0.00%
1880 681 48.61% 720 51.39% 0 0.00%



Communities[]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in King and Queen County, Virginia

References[]

  1. ^ "King and Queen County, Virginia". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/profile?g=0500000US51097. Retrieved January 30, 2022. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off.. pp. 175. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_9V1IAAAAMAAJ. 
  4. ^ Bagby, Alfred (10 April 2018). King and Queen County, Virginia. Neale Publishing Company. ISBN 9780722246290. https://books.google.com/books?id=vn62G6ONvRIC&q=shackelford+california+kentucky&pg=PA376. 
  5. ^ Boyd-Rush, Dorothy. "Molding a founding father". James Madison University. Retrieved March 25, 2013.
  6. ^ "James Madison's Biography". The Montpelier Foundation. Retrieved March 25, 2013.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. https://www.census.gov/geographies/reference-files/time-series/geo/gazetteer-files.html. 
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/va190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - King and Queen County, Virginia". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=p2&g=0500000US51097&tid=DECENNIALPL2010.P2. 
  13. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - King and Queen County, Virginia". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=p2&g=0500000US51097&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

Coordinates: 37°43′N 76°54′W / 37.72, -76.90

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at King and Queen County, Virginia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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