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Lancaster County, South Carolina
Lancaster County Courthouse (Built 1828), Lancaster, South Carolina.jpg
Lancaster County Original Courthouse, now a visitor's center.
Map of South Carolina highlighting Lancaster County
Location in the state of South Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting South Carolina
South Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1785
Seat Lancaster
Largest city Lancaster
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

555 sq mi (1,437 km²)
549 sq mi (1,422 km²)
6.0 sq mi (16 km²), 1.1%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

96,016
Congressional district 5th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website mylancastersc.org/

Lancaster County /ˈlæŋkəstər/[1] is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2020 census, its population was 96,016.[2] Its county seat is Lancaster, which has an urban population of 23,979.[3] The county was created in 1785.[4]

Lancaster County is included in the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is located in the Piedmont region.

History[]

For hundreds of years, the Catawba Indians occupied what became organized as Lancaster County as part of their historic tribal lands. The Siouan-speaking Catawba were once considered one of the most powerful Southeastern tribes. The Catawba and other Siouan peoples are believed to have emerged and coalesced as individual tribes in the Southeast. Primarily sedentary, cultivating their own crops, the Catawba were friendly toward the early European colonists.

Waxhaw Presbyterian Church Cemetery

When the first Anglo-Europeans reached this area in the early 1750s, they settled between Rum Creek and Twelve Mile Creek. Waxhaw Creek within this area was named after the Waxhaw Indian tribe that was prominent in the region. The majority of the new settlers were Scots-Irish who had migrated from Pennsylvania, where they had landed in Philadelphia. Other Scots-Irish from the backcountry of North Carolina and Virginia joined them. A significant minority of the population was German.

Many of the early settlers migrated to South Carolina from Lancaster, Lancashire in the northwest region of England. They had named their county for the House of Lancaster, which had opposed the House of York in the struggles of 1455–85, known as the War of the Roses. The House of Lancaster chose the red rose as their emblem while their neighbor, York County, boasts the white rose.

A second settlement was made in the lower part of the present Lancaster County on Hanging Rock Creek. The South Carolina colony first made a grant to settlers there in 1752; it included the overhanging mass of rock for which the creek was named. About the time the colony opened up this section, other settlers came in and settled along Lynches Creek, Little Lynches creek, Flat Creek, Beaver Creek, and lower Camp Creek. In coming to the Lancaster area, the first settlers followed old Indian paths. The increased traffic began to enlarge the paths and improve them as dirt roads. Several settlers from the regions of Norfolk, England, Suffolk, England and Essex, England arrived in what would later become Lancaster County in the late 1750s. These settlers were overwhelming Baptists, Methodists and Anglicans. After the American Revolution, those who were Anglican became members of the Episcopal Church.[5]

The Rocky River Road was also based on an Indian path. During the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Abraham Buford and his forces fled from Tarleton along this road. He was overtaken a few miles south of the North Carolina state line, where the Patriot forces were defeated in the Battle of Waxhaws. Locals call it Bufords Massacre. Today, the Rocky River Road has been absorbed by part of South Carolina Highway 522, which was constructed following the old thoroughfare very closely.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 555 square miles (1,440 km2), of which 549 square miles (1,420 km2) is land and 6.0 square miles (16 km2) (1.1%) is water.[6] It is bounded on the west by the Catawba River and Sugar Creek and on the east by the Lynches River.

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 6,302
1800 6,012 −4.6%
1810 6,318 5.1%
1820 8,716 38.0%
1830 10,361 18.9%
1840 9,907 −4.4%
1850 10,988 10.9%
1860 11,797 7.4%
1870 12,087 2.5%
1880 16,903 39.8%
1890 20,761 22.8%
1900 24,311 17.1%
1910 26,650 9.6%
1920 28,628 7.4%
1930 27,980 −2.3%
1940 33,542 19.9%
1950 37,071 10.5%
1960 39,352 6.2%
1970 43,328 10.1%
1980 53,361 23.2%
1990 54,516 2.2%
2000 61,351 12.5%
2010 76,652 24.9%

2000 census[]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 61,351 people, 23,178 households, and 16,850 families living in the county. The population density was 112 inhabitants per square mile (43 /km2). There were 24,962 housing units at an average density of 46 per square mile (18/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 71.03% White American, 26.86% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.27% Asian American, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.89% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 1.59% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 23,178 households, out of which 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.60% were married couples living together, 15.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 23.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.40% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 23.60% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,688, and the median income for a family was $40,955. Males had a median income of $30,176 versus $22,238 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,276. About 9.70% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty threshold, including 16.50% of those under age 18 and 15.80% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 76,652 people, 29,697 households, and 21,122 families living in the county.[8] The population density was 139.6 inhabitants per square mile (53.9 /km2). There were 32,687 housing units at an average density of 59.5 per square mile (23.0 /km2).[9] The racial makeup of the county was 71.5% white, 23.8% black or African American, 0.6% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 2.4% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.4% of the population.[8] In terms of ancestry, 23.9% were American, 8.0% were Irish, 7.6% were English, and 7.2% were German.[10]

Of the 29,697 households, 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.9% were non-families, and 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 39.7 years.[8]

The median income for a household in the county was $38,959 and the median income for a family was $46,388. Males had a median income of $39,681 versus $28,985 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,308. About 15.8% of families and 20.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.2% of those under age 18 and 11.2% of those age 65 or over.[11]

2020 census[]

Lancaster County racial composition[12]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 64,927 67.62%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 19,101 19.89%
Native American 220 0.23%
Asian 1,765 1.84%
Pacific Islander 14 0.01%
Other/Mixed 3,695 3.85%
Hispanic or Latino 6,294 6.56%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 96,016 people, 35,410 households, and 24,327 families residing in the county.

Communities[]

City[]

Towns[]

  • Heath Springs
  • Kershaw
  • Van Wyck

Census-designated places[]

  • Buford
  • Elgin
  • Irwin
  • Lancaster Mill (former CDP)
  • Springdale
  • Tradesville
  • Unity

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Indian Land
  • Taxahaw

Politics[]

United States presidential election results for Lancaster County, South Carolina[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 30,312 60.78% 18,937 37.97% 619 1.24%
2016 23,719 60.91% 13,812 35.47% 1,407 3.61%
2012 19,333 58.33% 13,419 40.49% 392 1.18%
2008 16,441 56.85% 12,139 41.97% 341 1.18%
2004 12,916 62.05% 7,631 36.66% 267 1.28%
2000 11,676 56.39% 8,782 42.41% 247 1.19%
1996 7,544 42.01% 8,752 48.74% 1,661 9.25%
1992 7,757 41.58% 8,307 44.53% 2,591 13.89%
1988 9,152 59.46% 6,181 40.15% 60 0.39%
1984 10,383 63.92% 5,804 35.73% 57 0.35%
1980 6,410 42.25% 8,283 54.60% 477 3.14%
1976 4,997 37.33% 8,324 62.19% 64 0.48%
1972 9,016 77.86% 2,461 21.25% 103 0.89%
1968 4,874 37.75% 3,151 24.41% 4,886 37.84%
1964 4,742 48.83% 4,970 51.17% 0 0.00%
1960 2,909 34.34% 5,561 65.66% 0 0.00%
1956 1,610 24.26% 4,398 66.26% 629 9.48%
1952 3,080 38.17% 4,989 61.83% 0 0.00%
1948 30 1.18% 855 33.74% 1,649 65.07%
1944 13 0.51% 2,383 93.97% 140 5.52%
1940 14 0.43% 3,205 99.57% 0 0.00%
1936 0 0.00% 2,631 100.00% 0 0.00%
1932 5 0.16% 3,103 99.84% 0 0.00%
1928 8 0.55% 1,436 99.45% 0 0.00%
1924 8 0.59% 1,355 99.41% 0 0.00%
1920 10 0.61% 1,633 99.39% 0 0.00%
1916 1 0.07% 1,426 99.86% 1 0.07%
1912 6 0.52% 1,140 99.04% 5 0.43%
1908 58 3.24% 1,730 96.65% 2 0.11%
1904 69 4.39% 1,504 95.61% 0 0.00%
1900 70 5.11% 1,300 94.89% 0 0.00%
1896 177 10.21% 1,557 89.79% 0 0.00%
1892 624 25.04% 1,744 69.98% 124 4.98%



Notable residents/natives[]

  • Bill Belk, professional football player (San Francisco 49ers)
  • Sheldon Brown, professional football player
  • Wayne A. Cauthen, first appointed African-American City Manager, Kansas City, MO
  • Danny Clyburn, professional baseball player (Baltimore Orioles, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Pittsburgh Pirates)
  • Shawn Crawford, sprinter and Olympic gold medalist
  • Don Dixon, record producer, songwriter, musician
  • Charles Duke, astronaut and moon-walker
  • James "Butch" Duncan, Professional NFL Baltimore Colts player Super Bowl V
  • Pep Harris, professional baseball player (Cleveland Indians, Anaheim Angels)
  • Jim Hodges, former Governor of South Carolina
  • Andrew Jackson, seventh President of the United States[14]
  • Nina Mae McKinney, actress and Broadway star
  • Todd Ray, aka 'T-Ray', Grammy Award-winning record producer
  • Julie Roberts, country music singer
  • Aaron Robinson, Major League Baseball player (New York Yankees, Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox)
  • Darrell Shropshire, professional football player
  • Nelson Sullivan, video artist and 1980s Club Kids personality.
  • J. Marion Sims, surgeon known as the "Father of Modern Gynecology"
  • The Zodiacs, led by Maurice Williams, R&B vocal group
  • Jeff Twitty, professional baseball player (Kansas City Royals)
  • Brian Williams, professional baseball player (Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox)

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Lancaster County, South Carolina

References[]

  1. ^ "Parlez-Vous Palmetto? The SC Pronunciation Guide ...". https://www.sciway.net/ccr/sc-pronunciations.html. 
  2. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/45/45057.html. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "South Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". The Newberry Library. 2009. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/SC_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  5. ^ The Background of the History of Lancaster County, South Carolina - Charlotte, N.C., December 1, 1933 By J. P. Richards · 1933
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_45.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  8. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US45057. 
  9. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US45057. 
  10. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US45057. 
  11. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US45057. 
  12. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US45057&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  14. ^ Born in the Waxhaw region on the North CarolinaSouth Carolina border. Exactly on which side of the border Jackson was born is in dispute. Jackson himself considered South Carolina as his birth state, and that is how it is most frequently listed. https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/06/AR2011030603406.html?wprss=rss_print/asection

External links[]

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Coordinates: 34°41′N 80°42′W / 34.69, -80.70


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Lancaster County, South Carolina. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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