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Lebanon County, Pennsylvania
St Lukes LebCo PA 1.jpg
St. Luke's Episcopal Church
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lebanon County
Location in the state of Pennsylvania
Map of the U.S. highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Founded February 16, 1813
Seat Lebanon
Largest city Lebanon
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

362 sq mi (938 km²)
362 sq mi (938 km²)
0.7 sq mi (2 km²), 0.2%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

143,257
390/sq mi (151/km²)
Congressional district 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.lebcounty.org

Lebanon ( /ˈlɛbənən/) County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 143,257.[1] Its county seat is the city of Lebanon.[2] The county was formed from portions of Dauphin and Lancaster counties in 1813, with minor boundary revisions in 1814 and 1821.[3] Lebanon County comprises the Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Harrisburg-York-Lebanon, Pennsylvania Combined Statistical Area. Lebanon is 72 miles northwest of Philadelphia, which is the nearest major city.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 362 square miles (940 km2), of which 362 square miles (940 km2) is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2) (0.2%) is water.[4] Most of it is drained by the Swatara Creek into the Susquehanna River while some eastern portions are drained by the Tulpehocken Creek (which originates in the county near Myerstown) eastward into the Schuylkill River. It consists in large part of a valley.[5]

Climate[]

The county has a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa) and the hardiness zone is 6b except along the northern boundary with Dauphin where it is 6a. Average monthly temperatures in center-city Lebanon range from 29.4 °F in January to 74.3 °F in July.[6]

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

  • Template:Jct/2
  • I-78
  • I-81
  • US 22
  • US 322
  • US 422
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 72]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 117]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 241]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 341]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 343]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 419]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 443]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 501]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 645]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 897]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/PA/link PA|PA 934]]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 16,988
1830 20,557 21.0%
1840 21,872 6.4%
1850 26,071 19.2%
1860 31,831 22.1%
1870 34,096 7.1%
1880 38,476 12.8%
1890 48,131 25.1%
1900 53,827 11.8%
1910 59,565 10.7%
1920 63,152 6.0%
1930 67,103 6.3%
1940 72,641 8.3%
1950 81,683 12.4%
1960 90,853 11.2%
1970 99,665 9.7%
1980 108,582 8.9%
1990 113,744 4.8%
2000 120,327 5.8%
2010 133,568 11.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2020[1][11]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 120,327 people and 32,771 families residing in the county. The population density was 332 people per square mile (128/km2). There were 49,320 housing units at an average density of 136 per square mile (53/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 94.46% White, 1.29% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.89% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.26% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. 4.96% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 45.6% were of German, 11.8% American and 6.1% Irish ancestry. 92.5% spoke English, 4.2% Spanish and 1.1% Pennsylvania Dutch as their first language.

There were 46,551 households, out of which 30.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.40% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.60% were non-families. 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.70% under the age of 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 28.00% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 95.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.70 males.

Metropolitan Statistical Area[]

The United States Office of Management and Budget[13] has designated Lebanon County as the Lebanon, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2010 U.S. Census[14] the metropolitan area ranked 16th most populous in the State of Pennsylvania and the 296th most populous in the United States with a population of 133,568. Lebanon County is also a part of the larger Harrisburg-York-Lebanon, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which combines the populations of Lebanon County as well as Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, Perry and York Counties in Pennsylvania. The Combined Statistical Area ranked 5th in the State of Pennsylvania and 43rd most populous in the United States with a population of 1,219,422.

Politics and government[]

United States presidential election results for Lebanon County, Pennsylvania[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 46,731 65.03% 23,932 33.30% 1,195 1.66%
2016 40,525 64.84% 18,953 30.32% 3,025 4.84%
2012 35,872 63.18% 19,900 35.05% 1,005 1.77%
2008 34,314 58.59% 23,310 39.80% 939 1.60%
2004 37,089 66.63% 18,109 32.53% 467 0.84%
2000 28,534 62.17% 16,093 35.06% 1,270 2.77%
1996 21,885 53.73% 14,187 34.83% 4,663 11.45%
1992 21,512 50.00% 12,350 28.71% 9,159 21.29%
1988 24,415 66.69% 11,912 32.54% 281 0.77%
1984 27,008 71.61% 10,520 27.89% 188 0.50%
1980 24,495 68.99% 8,281 23.32% 2,731 7.69%
1976 20,880 62.65% 11,785 35.36% 665 2.00%
1972 25,008 77.38% 6,683 20.68% 629 1.95%
1968 21,832 64.16% 9,529 28.01% 2,664 7.83%
1964 17,891 52.86% 15,882 46.93% 72 0.21%
1960 25,525 68.33% 11,761 31.49% 67 0.18%
1956 22,556 68.35% 10,406 31.53% 41 0.12%
1952 20,726 63.83% 11,611 35.76% 135 0.42%
1948 15,553 61.62% 9,418 37.31% 270 1.07%
1944 15,206 56.00% 11,818 43.52% 129 0.48%
1940 13,449 50.08% 13,315 49.58% 93 0.35%
1936 13,213 48.09% 13,800 50.23% 463 1.69%
1932 10,487 58.97% 5,924 33.31% 1,373 7.72%
1928 16,841 82.30% 3,278 16.02% 345 1.69%
1924 9,494 74.27% 2,464 19.28% 825 6.45%
1920 8,778 70.78% 3,016 24.32% 608 4.90%
1916 5,876 57.45% 3,821 37.36% 531 5.19%
1912 2,378 22.48% 2,972 28.09% 5,230 49.43%
1908 6,874 67.08% 2,858 27.89% 515 5.03%
1904 6,938 70.19% 2,449 24.78% 497 5.03%
1900 7,089 66.76% 3,050 28.72% 479 4.51%
1896 7,288 70.60% 2,819 27.31% 216 2.09%
1892 5,403 59.11% 3,409 37.29% 329 3.60%
1888 6,096 61.61% 3,670 37.09% 129 1.30%
1884 5,207 63.45% 2,977 36.28% 22 0.27%
1880 5,042 60.95% 3,218 38.90% 13 0.16%



Voter registration[]

According to the Secretary of State's office, Republicans comprise a majority of registered voters in Lebanon County.

Lebanon County Voter Registration Statistics as of March 15, 2021[16]
Political Party Total Voters Percentage
Template:Party color cell Republican 49,774 55.15%
Template:Party color cell Democratic 26,641 29.52%
Template:Party color cell No Party Affiliation 9,707 10.76%
Template:Party color cell Third Parties 4,126 4.57%
Total 90,248 100.00%

United States House of Representatives[]

The county is located in the 9th congressional district, represented by Dan Meuser, Republican.

State Senate[]

All of the county falls within the 48th Senatorial District. The seat is currently held by Lebanon business owner and Republican Chris Gebhard.

State House of Representatives[]

The county is divided into the 101st, 102nd and 104th Pennsylvania House Districts.

101st District[]

The 101st District, served by Republican Frank Ryan, includes:
  • North Londonderry Twp.
  • Palmyra Borough
  • South Annville Twp.
  • South Londonderry Twp.

102nd District[]

The 102nd District, served by Republican Russ Diamond, includes:
  • Annville Twp.
  • Bethel Twp.
  • Cleona Borough
  • Cold Spring Twp.
  • Cornwall Borough
  • Heidelberg Twp.
  • Jackson Twp.
  • Jonestown Borough
  • Millcreek Twp.
  • Myerstown Borough
  • North Lebanon Twp.
  • Richland Borough
  • South Lebanon Twp.
  • Swatara Twp.
  • Union Twp.
  • West Cornwall Twp.
  • West Lebanon Twp.

104th District[]

The 104th District, which includes North Annville Twp. and East Hanover Twp., is represented by Republican Sue Helm.

County government[]

The county is governed by three commissioners, who are elected every four years from a slate of four candidates (two Democrats and two Republicans). Other elected officials include County Controller, Sheriff, Coroner, Prothonotary and Clerk of Court, Recorder of Deeds, County Treasurer, and Register of Wills and Clerk of Orphans' Court.

Electoral history[]

For most of its history, Lebanon County has been one of the most Republican counties in Pennsylvania. The county is strongly Republican even by the standards of south-central Pennsylvania. It is very conservative for an urban county, having only supported a Democrat for president once since 1880. That came when Franklin D. Roosevelt won it in his 46-state landslide reelection; even then, FDR only carried it by 587 votes. The only other time since 1880 that the county has failed to support a Republican was in 1912, when the GOP was mortally divided and Theodore Roosevelt carried it on the Bull Moose ticket.

As a measure of how Republican the county has been, Democrats have only crossed the 40 percent mark three times since 1936–FDR in 1940 and 1944, and Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. In the latter election, Lebanon County was one of only four counties in the state to vote for Barry Goldwater, along with Snyder, Union, and Wayne counties.

Republicans are no less dominant at the state and local level. The row offices and all but one county commission seat are held by Republicans, and there are no elected Democrats above the county level.

In the 2006 election for U.S. Senate, the county cast 21,756 votes (55.1%) for Republican Rick Santorum and 17,737 (44.9%) for Democrat Bob Casey, Jr., who won the race. In that year's gubernatorial election, the county cast 22,775 votes (57.5%) for Republican Lynn Swann and 16,813 (42.5%) for Democrat Ed Rendell, who won the race.[17]

In the 2004 presidential election, the county cast 37,089 votes (66.6%) for Republican George W. Bush and 18,109 (32.5%) for Democrat John Kerry. In that same year's election for U.S. Senate, the county cast 35,336 votes (66.8%) for Republican Arlen Specter, 13,182 for Democrat Joe Hoeffel, 3,320 (6.3%) for Constitution Party candidate Jim Clymer, and 1,083 (2.0%) for Libertarian Betsy Summers.[18] In the 2008 presidential election the county cast 34,314 votes (58.59%) for Republican John McCain and 23,310 votes (39.8%) for Barack Obama.[19] In the 2016 presidential election, the county cast 38,804 votes (65,9 %) for Republican Donald Trump and 17,860 votes (30,3 %) for Democrat Hillary Clinton.[20]

In the 2002 gubernatorial election, the county cast 22,659 votes (62.7%) for Republican Mike Fisher and 12,712 (35.2%) for Democrat Ed Rendell, who won the race. In the 2002 race for the U.S. House of Representatives, Republican George Gekas received 21,733 votes (60.9%) from the county while Democrat Tim Holden received 13,945 (39.1%); Holden won.[21]

Education[]

Map of Lebanon County, Pennsylvania School Districts

Colleges and universities[]

  • Harrisburg Area Community College (Lebanon Campus)
  • Lebanon Valley College
  • Evangelical Seminary

Public school districts[]

  • Annville-Cleona School District
  • Cornwall-Lebanon School District
  • Eastern Lebanon County School District
  • Lebanon School District
  • Northern Lebanon School District
  • Palmyra Area School District

Communities[]

Map of Lebanon County, Pennsylvania with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following cities, boroughs and townships are located in Lebanon County:

City[]

Boroughs[]

  • Cleona
  • Cornwall
  • Jonestown
  • Mount Gretna
  • Myerstown
  • Palmyra
  • Richland

Townships[]

  • Annville
  • Bethel
  • Cold Spring
  • East Hanover
  • Heidelberg
  • Jackson
  • Millcreek
  • North Annville
  • North Cornwall
  • North Lebanon
  • North Londonderry
  • South Annville
  • South Lebanon
  • South Londonderry
  • Swatara
  • Union
  • West Cornwall
  • West Lebanon

Census-designated places[]

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law.

  • Annville
  • Avon
  • Campbelltown
  • Fort Indiantown Gap
  • Fredericksburg
  • Hebron
  • Lebanon South
  • Mount Gretna Heights
  • Newmanstown
  • Pleasant Hill
  • Quentin
  • Sand Hill
  • Schaefferstown
  • Timber Hills

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Anthracite
  • Bellegrove
  • Beverly Heights
  • Bordnersville
  • Buffalo Springs
  • Bunker Hill
  • Canaan Grove
  • Clear Spring
  • Coffeetown
  • Colebrook
  • Coheva
  • Dogtown
  • East Hanover
  • Ebenezer
  • Edisonville
  • Flintville
  • Fontana
  • Freeport Mills
  • Gold Mine
  • Gravel Hill
  • Greble
  • Green Point
  • Hamlin
  • Harper Tavern
  • Hauckville
  • Heilmandale
  • Indiantown
  • Inwood
  • Iona
  • Johnstown
  • Kleinfeltersville
  • Kutztown
  • Lawn
  • Lickdale
  • McGillstown
  • Midway
  • Millardsville
  • Millbach
  • Millbach Springs
  • Mount Ararat
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Mount Wilson
  • Mount Zion
  • Murray
  • Nacetown
  • Ono
  • Pansy Hill
  • Plainville
  • Prescott
  • Reinholdsville
  • Reistville
  • Rocherty
  • Rockwood
  • Sheridan
  • Shirksville
  • Springhaven
  • Stricklerstown
  • Syner
  • Union Water Works
  • Upper Lawn
  • Valley Glenn
  • Waldeck
  • Weavertown, Jackson Township
  • Weavertown, North Lebanon Township
  • West Jonestown
  • Westmont
  • Woodfort
  • Zinns Mill

Ghost towns[]

  • Cold Spring
  • Rausch Gap

Population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Lebanon County.[14]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Lebanon City 25,477
2 Palmyra Borough 7,320
3 Annville (township) CDP 4,767
4 Cornwall Borough 4,112
5 Campbelltown CDP 3,616
6 Myerstown Borough 3,062
7 Pleasant Hill CDP 2,643
8 Sand Hill CDP 2,496
9 Newmanstown CDP 2,478
10 Lebanon South CDP 2,270
11 Cleona Borough 2,080
12 Jonestown Borough 1,905
13 Avon CDP 1,667
14 Richland Borough 1,519
15 Fredericksburg CDP 1,357
16 Hebron CDP 1,305
17 Schaefferstown CDP 941
18 Quentin CDP 594
19 Timber Hills CDP 360
20 Mount Gretna Heights CDP 323
21 Mount Gretna Borough 196
22 Fort Indiantown Gap CDP 143

Parks and recreational places[]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/42/42075.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Our County Script error: No such module "webarchive".. Lebanon County Historical Society. Retrieved on July 23, 2013.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_42.txt. 
  5. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Lebanon, a S. E. county of Pennsylvania". The American Cyclopædia. 1879. 
  6. ^ "PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State U". https://prism.oregonstate.edu/explorer/. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/pa190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ "Census 2020". https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/lebanoncountypennsylvania/PST045219. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  13. ^ "Office of Management and Budget". https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb. 
  14. ^ a b "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html. 
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  16. ^ Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of State. "November 2021 Voter Registration Statistics" (XLS). https://www.dos.pa.gov/VotingElections/OtherServicesEvents/VotingElectionStatistics/Pages/VotingElectionStatistics.aspx. 
  17. ^ "Archived copy". http://www.electionreturns.state.pa.us/ElectionsInformation.aspx?FunctionID%3D12%26ElectionID%3D24. 
  18. ^ "Archived copy". http://www.electionreturns.state.pa.us/ElectionsInformation.aspx?FunctionID=12&ElectionID=11. 
  19. ^ "Archived copy". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/statesub.php?year=2008&fips=42075&f=1&off=0&elect=0. 
  20. ^ "Pennsylvania Election Results 2016: President Live Map by County, Real-Time Voting Updates". http://www.politico.com/2016-election/results/map/president/pennsylvania/. 
  21. ^ "Archived copy". http://www.electionreturns.state.pa.us/ElectionsInformation.aspx?FunctionID%3D12%26ElectionID%3D7. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 40°22′N 76°28′W / 40.37, -76.46


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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