Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Licking County, Ohio
Newark-ohio-courthouse.jpg
Licking County Courthouse
Seal of Licking County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Licking County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 1, 1808[1]
Seat Newark
Largest city Newark
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

687 sq mi (1,779 km²)
683 sq mi (1,769 km²)
5.0 sq mi (13 km²), 0.7%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

178,519
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 12th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.lcounty.com

Licking County is a county located in the central portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 178,519.[2] Its county seat is Newark.[3] The county was formed on January 30, 1808, from portions of Fairfield County.

It is named after the Licking River, which is thought to be named for the salt licks that were in the area.[4] However, one account explains it as an English pronunciation of the river's indigenous Delaware name W'li/'ik'/nk, which means "where the flood waters recede".[5]

Licking County is part of the Columbus, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 687 square miles (1,780 km2), of which 683 square miles (1,770 km2) is land and 5.0 square miles (13 km2) (0.7%) is water.[6] It is the third-largest county in Ohio by land area.

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

  • I-70
  • US 40
  • US 62
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 3,852
1820 11,861 207.9%
1830 20,869 75.9%
1840 35,096 68.2%
1850 38,846 10.7%
1860 37,011 −4.7%
1870 35,756 −3.4%
1880 40,450 13.1%
1890 43,279 7.0%
1900 47,070 8.8%
1910 55,590 18.1%
1920 56,426 1.5%
1930 59,962 6.3%
1940 62,279 3.9%
1950 70,645 13.4%
1960 90,242 27.7%
1970 107,799 19.5%
1980 120,981 12.2%
1990 128,300 6.0%
2000 145,491 13.4%
2010 166,492 14.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2020 [11]

2000 census[]

At the 2000 census there were 146,491 people, 55,609 households, and 40,149 families living in the county. The population density was 212 people per square mile (82/km2). There were 58,760 housing units at an average density of 86 per square mile (33/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 95.64% White, 2.06% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. 0.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[12] Of the 55,609 households 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.50% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were non-families. 23.10% of households were one person and 9.10% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.01.

The age distribution was 26.00% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 11.90% 65 or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 94.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.00 males.

The median household income was $44,124 and the median family income was $51,969. Males had a median income of $37,957 versus $26,884 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,581. About 5.50% of families and 7.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.10% of those under age 18 and 7.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

At the 2010 census, there were 166,492 people, 63,989 households, and 45,162 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 243.9 inhabitants per square mile (94.2 /km2). There were 69,291 housing units at an average density of 101.5 per square mile (39.2 /km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 93.2% white, 3.4% black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.4% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 29.5% were German, 16.0% were Irish, 13.0% were English, 10.8% were American, and 5.5% were Italian.[15]

Of the 63,989 households, 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.4% were non-families, and 23.8% of households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.00. The median age was 39.1 years.[13]

The median household income was $53,291 and the median family income was $64,386. Males had a median income of $47,391 versus $37,054 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,534. About 8.2% of families and 11.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.7% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Politics[]

Prior to 1944, Licking County primarily supported Democratic Party candidates in presidential elections, only voting for Republican candidates five times from 1856 to 1940 in five national landslides for the party. From 1944 on, the county has become a Republican stronghold presidentially, with the only Democratic presidential candidate to win the county since then being Lyndon B. Johnson in the midst of his 1964 national landslide.

United States presidential election results for Licking County, Ohio[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 59,514 63.05% 33,055 35.02% 1,827 1.94%
2016 51,241 61.28% 27,376 32.74% 5,007 5.99%
2012 45,503 55.80% 34,201 41.94% 1,846 2.26%
2008 46,918 56.82% 33,932 41.09% 1,720 2.08%
2004 49,016 61.72% 30,053 37.84% 351 0.44%
2000 37,180 59.52% 23,196 37.13% 2,090 3.35%
1996 28,276 48.78% 22,624 39.03% 7,067 12.19%
1992 26,918 44.54% 18,898 31.27% 14,618 24.19%
1988 34,540 66.72% 16,793 32.44% 434 0.84%
1984 37,560 72.26% 13,995 26.93% 421 0.81%
1980 28,425 58.28% 17,208 35.28% 3,136 6.43%
1976 23,518 53.78% 19,247 44.01% 968 2.21%
1972 28,070 66.47% 12,460 29.50% 1,702 4.03%
1968 19,542 48.89% 15,021 37.58% 5,407 13.53%
1964 15,096 39.25% 23,364 60.75% 0 0.00%
1960 23,653 63.95% 13,335 36.05% 0 0.00%
1956 21,912 67.44% 10,581 32.56% 0 0.00%
1952 20,385 63.50% 11,718 36.50% 0 0.00%
1948 15,164 54.62% 12,511 45.07% 87 0.31%
1944 16,815 56.74% 12,819 43.26% 0 0.00%
1940 16,288 49.86% 16,379 50.14% 0 0.00%
1936 11,958 39.37% 17,785 58.56% 629 2.07%
1932 13,355 48.01% 13,904 49.99% 556 2.00%
1928 19,130 72.14% 7,244 27.32% 143 0.54%
1924 13,914 58.49% 7,428 31.23% 2,446 10.28%
1920 11,924 51.89% 10,679 46.47% 378 1.64%
1916 5,935 40.93% 8,183 56.43% 382 2.63%
1912 4,487 33.73% 6,120 46.01% 2,694 20.25%
1908 6,756 44.55% 7,685 50.67% 725 4.78%
1904 6,798 51.04% 6,019 45.19% 503 3.78%
1900 5,854 46.09% 6,716 52.88% 130 1.02%
1896 5,560 45.32% 6,611 53.89% 96 0.78%
1892 4,619 41.97% 6,038 54.87% 348 3.16%
1888 4,867 43.04% 6,199 54.82% 241 2.13%
1884 4,599 42.97% 5,958 55.67% 145 1.35%
1880 4,210 42.62% 5,575 56.44% 93 0.94%
1876 3,962 41.84% 5,473 57.79% 35 0.37%
1872 3,493 43.01% 4,562 56.17% 67 0.82%
1868 3,487 44.03% 4,432 55.97% 0 0.00%
1864 3,312 46.22% 3,853 53.78% 0 0.00%
1860 3,502 47.06% 3,154 42.38% 786 10.56%
1856 3,027 44.42% 3,371 49.46% 417 6.12%



Places of interest[]

View from a section of the Great Circle Earthworks, part of the Newark Earthworks.

  • Newark Earthworks
  • Blackhand Gorge State Nature Preserve
  • Flint Ridge State Memorial
  • Dawes Arboretum
  • Ye Olde Mill in Utica, where Velvet ice cream is produced.[18]
  • Heisey Glass Museum[19]
  • Longaberger former basket facility (Main office building was a 7-story replica basket, the largest in the world)
  • National Trail Raceway - NHRA Dragstrip[20]
  • Denison University
  • Home Building Association Bank

Sports[]

Longaberger former headquarters in Newark, Ohio, a giant Longaberger medium market basket.

Licking County high school athletic programs include Granville High School, Heath High School, Johnstown-Monroe High School, Lakewood High School, Licking Valley High School, Licking Heights High School, Newark Catholic High School, Newark High School, Northridge High School, Utica High School, and Watkins Memorial High School. In baseball, a state title has been won by a Licking County high school team every year since to 2002, when three Licking County teams won state titles. Newark Catholic High School and Heath High School have combined for nine state titles in a six-year span.

Licking County schools won at least one state title in four straight sport seasons: Heath in both baseball and boys track and field (2007), Newark Catholic in football (2007), Newark in boys basketball (2008) and Lakewood in softball (2008).

Communities[]

Map of Licking County, Ohio with Municipal and Township Labels

Cities[]

Villages[]

  • Alexandria
  • Buckeye Lake
  • Granville
  • Gratiot
  • Hanover
  • Hartford
  • Hebron
  • Johnstown
  • Kirkersville
  • St. Louisville
  • Utica

Townships[]

  • Bennington
  • Bowling Green
  • Burlington
  • Eden
  • Etna
  • Fallsbury
  • Franklin
  • Granville
  • Hanover
  • Harrison
  • Hartford
  • Hopewell
  • Jersey
  • Liberty
  • Licking
  • Lima (defunct - merged in 1996 with Pataskala)
  • Madison
  • Mary Ann
  • McKean
  • Monroe
  • Newark
  • Newton
  • Perry
  • St. Albans
  • Union
  • Washington

[21]

Census-designated places[]

  • Beechwood Trails
  • Brownsville
  • Etna
  • Granville South
  • Harbor Hills
  • Marne

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Amsterdam
  • Appleton
  • Ben
  • Boston
  • Chatham
  • Columbia Center
  • Fleatown
  • Fredonia
  • Homer
  • Jacksontown
  • Jersey
  • Linnville
  • Lloyd Corners
  • Locust Grove
  • Luray
  • New Way
  • Outville
  • Perryton
  • Rain Rock
  • Toboso
  • Union Station
  • Wagram
  • Welsh Hills
  • Wilkins Run

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Licking County, Ohio

References[]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Licking County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Licking.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 186. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_9V1IAAAAMAAJ. 
  5. ^ (April 1957) "Indian River and Place Names in Ohio". Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly 66 (2): 146–148. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ 2020 census
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39089. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39089. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39089. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39089. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  18. ^ "The Velvet Ice Cream Company in Utica, Ohio". http://www.velveticecream.com/olde_mill.asp. 
  19. ^ "Heisey Collectors of America". Heiseymuseum.org. http://www.heiseymuseum.org/. 
  20. ^ "National Trail Raceway". http://www.nationaltrailraceway.com. 
  21. ^ Ohio Townships

Further reading[]

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links[]

Coordinates: 40°05′N 82°29′W / 40.09, -82.48

Advertisement