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Lucas County, Ohio
Lucas County, Ohio Courthouse at night.jpg
The Lucas County Courthouse in Toledo
Flag of Lucas County, Ohio
Flag
Seal of Lucas County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Lucas County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded June 20, 1835[1]
Named for Robert Lucas
Seat Toledo
Largest city Toledo
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

596 sq mi (1,544 km²)
341 sq mi (883 km²)
255 sq mi (660 km²), 43%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

431,279
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional districts 5th, 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.co.lucas.oh.us

Lucas County is a county located in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Ohio. It is bordered to the east by Lake Erie, and to the southeast by the Maumee River, which runs to the lake. As of the 2020 census, the population was 431,279.[2] Its county seat is Toledo, located at the mouth of the Maumee River on the lake.[3] The county was named for Robert Lucas, 12th governor of Ohio, in 1835 during his second term.[4] Its establishment provoked the Toledo War conflict with the Michigan Territory, which claimed some of its area. Lucas County is named after Robert Lucas, 12th Governor of the State of Ohio and the winning governor of the Toledo War, and is the central county of the Toledo Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Exterior view of Lucas County Courthouse with man walking and pile of snow.

Lucas County Courthouse, 1910s

On August 20, 1794, near the site of the present-day town of Maumee, American forces led by General Anthony Wayne won a decisive victory over allied Indian forces at the Battle of Fallen Timbers after years of conflict in what was known as the Northwest Indian War. The defeat of the Native forces resulted in the opening of the entire Northwest Territory for white settlement. Northwest Ohio was occupied chiefly by villages and bands of the Odawa people, who had trading relations with the French at Fort Detroit since 1701. Other Odawa were located in southeast Michigan and further north on the peninsula. They ceded much of that territory in the Treaty of Greenville but retained control of lands along the Maumee River until after the War of 1812. The last Odawa band, that of Ottokee, grandson of Chief Pontiac, left the Maumee River area for Kansas in 1839.[5][6]

The disputed portion of Michigan Territory claimed by the state of Ohio known as the Toledo Strip.

Lucas County was established in 1835. At that time, both Ohio and Michigan Territory claimed sovereignty over a 468-square-mile (1,210 km2) region along their border (see Toledo War). When Michigan petitioned Congress for statehood in 1835, it sought to include the disputed territory within its bounds. In response, the Ohio General Assembly formally organized part of the area as Lucas County, naming it after the incumbent governor of Ohio, Robert Lucas.

Geography

Devonian shell of Sylvania

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 596 square miles (1,540 km2), of which 341 square miles (880 km2) is land and 255 square miles (660 km2) (43%) is water.[7] It is the fourth-smallest county in Ohio by land area. Much of the county lies within what was at the time of its establishment, a vast network of forests, wetlands, and grasslands known as the Great Black Swamp.

Rivers

  • Maumee River
  • Ottawa River

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

  • Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge
  • Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge

Major highways

  • I-73 (future)
  • I-75
  • Template:Jct/3
  • I-280
  • I-475
  • US 20
  • US 20A
  • US 23
  • US 24
  • US 223
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link SR|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev SR]]

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1840 9,382
1850 12,363 31.8%
1860 25,831 108.9%
1870 46,722 80.9%
1880 67,377 44.2%
1890 102,296 51.8%
1900 153,559 50.1%
1910 192,728 25.5%
1920 275,721 43.1%
1930 347,709 26.1%
1940 344,333 −1.0%
1950 395,551 14.9%
1960 456,931 15.5%
1970 484,370 6.0%
1980 471,741 −2.6%
1990 462,361 −2.0%
2000 455,054 −1.6%
2010 441,815 −2.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2020 [12]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 455,054 people, 182,847 households, and 116,290 families living in the county. The population density was 1,337 people per square mile (516/km2). There were 196,259 housing units at an average density of 576 per square mile (223/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 77.50% White, 16.98% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 1.21% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.86% from other races, and 2.16% from two or more races. 4.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 182,847 households, out of which 31.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.70% were married couples living together, 14.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.40% were non-families. 30.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.30% under the age of 18, 9.80% from 18 to 24, 29.10% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 13.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 92.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,004, and the median income for a family was $48,190. Males had a median income of $39,415 versus $26,447 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,518. About 10.70% of families and 13.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.70% of those under age 18 and 8.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 441,815 people, 180,267 households, and 111,016 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 1,296.2 inhabitants per square mile (500.5 /km2). There were 202,630 housing units at an average density of 594.5 per square mile (229.5 /km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 74.0% white, 19.0% black or African American, 1.5% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 2.0% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 6.1% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 29.8% were German, 13.2% were Irish, 9.7% were Polish, 8.0% were English, and 3.8% were American.[15]

Of the 180,267 households, 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.0% were married couples living together, 16.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.4% were non-families, and 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.01. The median age was 37.0 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $42,072 and the median income for a family was $54,855. Males had a median income of $46,806 versus $33,394 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,981. About 14.0% of families and 18.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.4% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Economy

Top Employers

According to the county's 2019 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[17] the top ten employers in the county are:

# Employer # of employees
1 Promedica Health Services 11,517
2 University of Toledo 8,502
3 Fiat Chrysler - Toledo North Plant; Toledo South Plant 6,759
4 Mercy Health Partners 5,880
5 Toledo Public Schools 3,193
6 Lucas County 2,821
7 City of Toledo 2,748
8 Kroger 2,300
9 Walmart 1,954
10 General Motors - Powertrain 1,778

Politics

Lucas County is a strongly Democratic county. The only Republicans to win a majority or plurality in the county since 1932 have been Thomas E. Dewey in 1944, Dwight D. Eisenhower in both 1952 and 1956, and Ronald Reagan in 1980 (plurality) and 1984.[18]

Unlike most counties in northwest Ohio, Lucas County is strongly Democratic. Although Ronald Reagan carried the county twice, no other Republican has won the county in the last 50 years.[19] In 1972, for instance, it was one of only two counties in the entire state that supported George McGovern.

In the last five Presidential elections the Democratic candidate's margin of victory has ranged from 18% to 30.5% in the case of Barack Obama.[20] The eastern portion of Lucas County, including Toledo lies in Ohio's 9th congressional district, and it is represented by Marcy Kaptur, who is a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. The western portion, however, lies in Ohio's 5th congressional district, and is represented by Bob Latta.

United States presidential election results for Lucas County, Ohio[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 81,763 40.66% 115,411 57.39% 3,933 1.96%
2016 75,698 38.07% 110,833 55.74% 12,299 6.19%
2012 69,940 33.21% 136,616 64.86% 4,065 1.93%
2008 73,706 33.43% 142,852 64.80% 3,899 1.77%
2004 87,160 39.54% 132,715 60.21% 555 0.25%
2000 73,342 39.15% 108,344 57.83% 5,664 3.02%
1996 58,120 31.98% 104,911 57.72% 18,716 10.30%
1992 63,297 31.18% 99,989 49.25% 39,733 19.57%
1988 83,788 45.27% 99,755 53.89% 1,552 0.84%
1984 100,285 50.25% 97,293 48.76% 1,976 0.99%
1980 86,653 45.30% 85,341 44.61% 19,304 10.09%
1976 76,069 41.36% 103,658 56.36% 4,180 2.27%
1972 88,401 48.38% 90,142 49.34% 4,166 2.28%
1968 69,403 38.98% 91,346 51.31% 17,288 9.71%
1964 57,782 31.08% 128,110 68.92% 0 0.00%
1960 94,679 47.94% 102,825 52.06% 0 0.00%
1956 100,501 53.15% 88,598 46.85% 0 0.00%
1952 97,490 51.71% 91,043 48.29% 0 0.00%
1948 66,798 46.76% 74,064 51.85% 1,991 1.39%
1944 77,247 50.37% 76,109 49.63% 0 0.00%
1940 76,405 49.50% 77,948 50.50% 0 0.00%
1936 45,853 34.48% 74,155 55.76% 12,971 9.75%
1932 47,796 40.83% 64,902 55.44% 4,362 3.73%
1928 78,435 63.21% 44,977 36.25% 669 0.54%
1924 53,670 55.39% 11,948 12.33% 31,284 32.28%
1920 52,449 59.08% 30,452 34.30% 5,868 6.61%
1916 16,711 33.01% 30,779 60.80% 3,136 6.19%
1912 5,622 14.95% 13,999 37.22% 17,989 47.83%
1908 18,715 48.46% 16,208 41.97% 3,697 9.57%
1904 22,924 67.33% 8,259 24.26% 2,862 8.41%
1900 17,128 51.20% 15,390 46.01% 932 2.79%
1896 16,758 54.45% 13,759 44.71% 259 0.84%
1892 11,211 52.02% 9,860 45.75% 481 2.23%
1888 9,443 51.29% 8,638 46.92% 331 1.80%
1884 8,341 51.86% 7,384 45.91% 360 2.24%
1880 7,157 52.67% 5,985 44.04% 447 3.29%
1876 6,524 54.55% 5,155 43.10% 281 2.35%
1872 5,253 62.66% 3,083 36.77% 48 0.57%
1868 4,873 61.22% 3,087 38.78% 0 0.00%
1864 3,790 64.40% 2,095 35.60% 0 0.00%
1860 2,889 58.85% 1,820 37.07% 200 4.07%
1856 1,639 41.07% 1,866 46.76% 486 12.18%



Government

County officials

Office Name Party
Commissioner Gary L. Byers Democratic
Commissioner Peter L. Gerken Democratic
Commissioner Tina Skeldon Wozniak Democratic
Prosecutor Julia R. Bates Democratic
Sheriff Mike Navarre Democratic
Clerk of Courts J. Bernie Quilter Democratic
Recorder Michael Ashford Democratic
Treasurer Lindsay Webb Democratic
Engineer Mike Pniewski Democratic
Coroner Diane Scala-Barnett Democratic
Auditor Anita L. Lopez Democratic

[22]

Communities

Map of Lucas County, Ohio with Municipal and Township labels

Historical map of Lucas County, 1899

Cities

  • Maumee
  • Oregon
  • Sylvania
  • Toledo (county seat)
  • Waterville

Villages

  • Berkey
  • Harbor View
  • Holland
  • Ottawa Hills
  • Swanton (mostly in Fulton County)
  • Whitehouse

Townships

Census-designated places

  • Curtice
  • Neapolis
  • Reno Beach

Other unincorporated communities

  • Alexis Addition
  • Bono
  • Business Corner
  • East Swanton
  • Frankfort
  • Monclova
  • Niles Beach
  • Providence
  • Richfield Center
  • Shoreland
  • Yondota

Ghost towns

  • Marengo
  • Providence

See also

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Lucas County, Ohio
  • Parochial and technology Schools in Lucas County, Ohio

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Lucas County". Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Lucas.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "Lucas County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39095&sid=0. 
  5. ^ Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History (University of Oklahoma Press: Norman, 1986) pp. 3, 58–59
  6. ^ Larry Angelo (2nd chief of the Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma), The Migration of the Ottawas from 1615 to Present, (1997), pp. 3-6
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ 2020 census
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39095. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39095. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39095. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39095. 
  17. ^ "Lucas County, Ohio Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Year Ended December 31, 2019". https://www.co.lucas.oh.us/ImageRepository/Document?documentId=77397. 
  18. ^ Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  19. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Atlas (Maps for Ohio by election)". http://www.uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/comparemaps.php?year=2008&fips=39&f=1&off=0&elect=0. 
  20. ^ "President Map - Election Results 2008 - The New York Times". http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/results/president/map.html?scp=1&sq=%22election+map&st=cse. 
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  22. ^ "Lucas County elected officials". http://co.lucas.oh.us/DocumentCenter/Home/View/7703. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h "TOWNSHIP WEBSITES | Ohio Township Association". http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites. 

External links

Coordinates: 41°41′N 83°30′W / 41.68, -83.50

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