Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Mason County, Illinois
Mason County Courthouse, Havana.jpg
Mason County Courthouse, Havana
Map of Illinois highlighting Mason County
Location in the state of Illinois
Map of the U.S. highlighting Illinois
Illinois's location in the U.S.
Founded 1841
Named for George Mason
Seat Havana
Largest city Havana
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

563 sq mi (1,458 km²)
539 sq mi (1,396 km²)
24 sq mi (62 km²), 4.3
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

13,086
Congressional district 18th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.masoncountyil.org

Mason County is a county in the U.S. state of Illinois. According to the 2020 census, it had a population of 13,086.[1] Its county seat is Havana.[2] The county is named in honor of George Mason, a member of the Virginia legislature who campaigned for the adoption of the United States Bill of Rights.

History[]

Mason County was created in 1841 out of portions of Tazewell and Menard counties.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 563 square miles (1,460 km2), of which 539 square miles (1,400 km2) is land and 24 square miles (62 km2) (4.3%) is water.[3]

Mason County is bound on the south by the Sangamon River, and on the west by the Illinois River. These rivers join at the county's southwest tip.

The soil covering much of Mason County is very sandy. This was formed during the melting of the Wisconsin Glacier about 10,000 years ago. Meltwater from the glacier deposited large amounts of sand in a delta region near at the junction of the Sangamon and Illinois Rivers.

The sandy soil does not hold water well, quickly exposing crops to drought conditions as the water table drops during periods of low precipitation. However, the soil is very good for growing vegetables that are otherwise not common in Illinois. Modern irrigation has made this a highly productive agricultural area.

A sand wetland on the Illinois River is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as the Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge.

Climate and weather[]

Climate chart for Havana, Illinois
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
1.85
 
32
14
 
 
1.94
 
38
19
 
 
3.02
 
50
30
 
 
3.45
 
63
40
 
 
4.43
 
74
51
 
 
3.81
 
84
60
 
 
3.87
 
88
64
 
 
3.45
 
86
61
 
 
3.21
 
80
52
 
 
2.86
 
68
41
 
 
3.26
 
51
30
 
 
2.63
 
37
19
temperatures in °Cprecipitation totals in mm
source: The Weather Channel[4]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Havana have ranged from a low of 14 °F (−10 °C) in January to a high of 88 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −30 °F (−34.4 °C) was recorded in January 1999 and a record high of 106 °F (41 °C) was recorded in July 1983. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 1.85 inches (47 mm) in January to 4.43 inches (113 mm) in May.[4]

Major highways[]

  • US 136.svg U.S. Highway 136
  • Illinois 10.svg Illinois Route 10
  • Illinois 29.svg Illinois Route 29
  • Illinois 78.svg Illinois Route 78
  • Illinois 97.svg Illinois Route 97

Adjacent counties[]

National protected area[]

  • Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 5,921
1860 10,931 84.6%
1870 16,184 48.1%
1880 16,242 0.4%
1890 16,067 −1.1%
1900 17,491 8.9%
1910 17,377 −0.7%
1920 16,634 −4.3%
1930 15,115 −9.1%
1940 15,358 1.6%
1950 15,326 −0.2%
1960 15,193 −0.9%
1970 16,161 6.4%
1980 19,492 20.6%
1990 16,269 −16.5%
2000 16,038 −1.4%
2010 14,666 −8.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2020[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,666 people, 6,079 households, and 4,060 families living in the county.[9] The population density was 27.2 inhabitants per square mile (10.5 /km2). There were 7,077 housing units at an average density of 13.1 per square mile (5.1 /km2).[3] The racial makeup of the county was 98.1% white, 0.4% black or African American, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.8% of the population.[9] In terms of ancestry, 33.8% were German, 15.6% were American, 11.1% were English, and 10.3% were Irish.[10]

Of the 6,079 households, 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.2% were non-families, and 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age was 44.0 years.[9]

The median income for a household in the county was $42,461 and the median income for a family was $51,348. Males had a median income of $43,448 versus $31,087 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,427. About 13.8% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.6% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.[11]

Mason County was identified as a “sundown” county which “has remained all white for many decades, despite its location between Springfield and Peoria...”[12]

Communities[]

Cities[]

Town[]

  • Topeka

Villages[]

  • Bath
  • Easton
  • Forest City
  • Kilbourne
  • Manito
  • San Jose

Census-designated place[]

  • Goofy Ridge

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Biggs
  • Bishop
  • Lakewood
  • Matanzas Beach

Townships[]

  • Allens Grove
  • Bath
  • Crane Creek
  • Forest City
  • Havana
  • Kilbourne
  • Lynchburg
  • Manito
  • Mason City
  • Pennsylvania
  • Quiver
  • Salt Creek
  • Sherman

Politics[]

Although it voted for the Whig Party in the three elections from 1840 to 1848, Mason County was to be solidly Democratic for the next sixty to seventy years due to its anti-Yankee German-American heritage. It was not until the 1920 election when bitter resentment was felt by German-Americans at Woodrow Wilson’s postwar policies that Mason supported a GOP candidate.

In the following eighty years, Mason was a Republican-leaning swing county, although isolationist sentiment did cause it to vote narrowly for Wendell Willkie in 1940 and more convincingly for Thomas E. Dewey in 1944.

United States presidential election results for Mason County, Illinois[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 4,654 68.59% 1,985 29.26% 146 2.15%
2016 4,058 62.50% 2,014 31.02% 421 6.48%
2012 3,265 51.86% 2,867 45.54% 164 2.60%
2008 3,141 45.98% 3,542 51.85% 148 2.17%
2004 3,907 54.39% 3,215 44.76% 61 0.85%
2000 3,411 50.37% 3,192 47.14% 169 2.50%
1996 2,430 37.71% 3,385 52.53% 629 9.76%
1992 2,473 32.11% 3,969 51.53% 1,260 16.36%
1988 3,424 49.95% 3,406 49.69% 25 0.36%
1984 4,109 54.89% 3,354 44.80% 23 0.31%
1980 4,644 60.37% 2,680 34.84% 369 4.80%
1976 3,847 49.01% 3,947 50.29% 55 0.70%
1972 4,897 62.70% 2,901 37.14% 12 0.15%
1968 3,899 49.65% 3,365 42.85% 589 7.50%
1964 2,833 36.84% 4,857 63.16% 0 0.00%
1960 4,337 53.02% 3,824 46.75% 19 0.23%
1956 4,677 59.29% 3,199 40.55% 13 0.16%
1952 4,982 61.91% 3,061 38.04% 4 0.05%
1948 3,525 49.83% 3,503 49.52% 46 0.65%
1944 3,959 54.52% 3,282 45.19% 21 0.29%
1940 4,541 50.47% 4,416 49.08% 41 0.46%
1936 3,395 38.88% 5,278 60.45% 58 0.66%
1932 2,551 30.73% 5,681 68.45% 68 0.82%
1928 3,956 54.78% 3,246 44.95% 19 0.26%
1924 3,522 52.72% 2,536 37.96% 622 9.31%
1920 3,842 58.40% 2,595 39.44% 142 2.16%
1916 3,029 42.43% 3,886 54.43% 224 3.14%
1912 948 23.00% 2,173 52.73% 1,000 24.27%
1908 1,924 43.49% 2,264 51.18% 236 5.33%
1904 1,798 45.04% 1,806 45.24% 388 9.72%
1900 2,027 43.72% 2,508 54.10% 101 2.18%
1896 2,100 45.83% 2,407 52.53% 75 1.64%
1892 1,614 40.01% 2,211 54.81% 209 5.18%



See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Mason County, Illinois

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/17/17125.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY10/0500000US17125. 
  4. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Havana, Illinois". The Weather Channel. http://www.weather.com/weather/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/USIL0521. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/il190090.txt. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  9. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US17125. 
  10. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US17125. 
  11. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US17125. 
  12. ^ Loewen, James (2005). Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism. New York: The New Press. pp. 80. ISBN 978-1-62097-454-4. 
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

Coordinates: 40°14′N 89°55′W / 40.24, -89.91

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Mason County, Illinois. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Advertisement