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Monongalia County, West Virginia
Mon Tower.JPG
Monongalia County Courthouse
Seal of Monongalia County, West Virginia
Seal
Map of West Virginia highlighting Monongalia County
Location in the state of West Virginia
Map of the U.S. highlighting West Virginia
West Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded October 9, 1776
Seat Morgantown
Largest city Morgantown
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

366 sq mi (948 km²)
360 sq mi (932 km²)
5.8 sq mi (15 km²), 1.6%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

105,822
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.co.monongalia.wv.us

New Monongalia County Justice Center in 2017

Monongalia County, known locally as Mon County, is located in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 105,822,[1] making it West Virginia's third-most populous county. Its county seat is at Morgantown.[2] The county was founded in 1776. Monongalia County is included in the Morgantown, WV Metropolitan Statistical Area, and is the largest county in North-Central West Virginia. It is part of the Pittsburgh media market.

History[]

Map of Ohio, Monongalia, & Yohogania Counties circa 1776. Monongalia County is in magenta.

Monongalia County takes its name from the Monongahela River. The name Monongalia may be a misspelling of Monongahela. Alternatively, the conventional Latinate ending "-ia" (designating "land of..." or "country of..." — as in Arabia, Bolivia or Colombia) may have been added to Monongahela (i.e., "Land of the Monongahela").

Monongalia County was formed in 1776 when Virginia's remote District of West Augusta was divided into three counties: Ohio, Yohogania and Monongalia, all named for their most prominent rivers. Ohio County then encompassed most of the western region of the district bordering the Ohio River, including parts of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania. Yohogania County consisted of much of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania and the present counties of Hancock and the northern part of Brooke in West Virginia. Monongalia County also encompassed what are now the counties of Tucker, Randolph, Harrison and Barbour in north-central West Virginia, as well as parts of what are now Washington, Greene and Fayette Counties in Pennsylvania. In 1780, in his Notes on the State of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson gave the militia enrollment of what was then the vast Monongalia County at 1,000 troops.

In 1863, West Virginia's counties were divided into civil townships, with the intention of encouraging local government. This proved impractical in the heavily rural state, and in 1872 the townships were converted into magisterial districts.[3] Monongalia County was divided into seven districts: Battelle, Cass, Clay, Clinton, Grant, Morgan, and Union. After a century of relative stability, in the 1970s Monongalia's seven historic magisterial districts were consolidated into three new Districts: Central, Eastern, and Western.[4]


Geography[]

Adjacent counties[]

Major Highways[]

  • I-68
  • I-79
  • US 19
  • US 119
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WV/link WV|Template:Infobox road/WV/abbrev WV]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WV/link WV|Template:Infobox road/WV/abbrev WV]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WV/link WV|Template:Infobox road/WV/abbrev WV]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WV/link WV|Template:Infobox road/WV/abbrev WV]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WV/link WV|Template:Infobox road/WV/abbrev WV]]

Rivers, streams, and lakes[]

  • Monongahela River
  • Cheat River
  • Deckers Creek
  • Cam Harker Spring
  • Cheat Lake
  • Dunkard Creek
  • Aarons Creek

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 4,768
1800 8,540 79.1%
1810 12,793 49.8%
1820 11,060 −13.5%
1830 14,056 27.1%
1840 17,368 23.6%
1850 12,387 −28.7%
1860 13,048 5.3%
1870 13,547 3.8%
1880 14,985 10.6%
1890 15,705 4.8%
1900 19,049 21.3%
1910 24,334 27.7%
1920 33,618 38.2%
1930 50,083 49.0%
1940 51,252 2.3%
1950 60,797 18.6%
1960 55,617 −8.5%
1970 63,714 14.6%
1980 75,024 17.8%
1990 75,509 0.6%
2000 81,866 8.4%
2010 96,189 17.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790–1960[6] 1900–1990[7]
1990–2000[8] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census[]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 81,866 people, 33,446 households, and 18,495 families living in the county. The population density was 227 people per square mile (88/km2). There were 36,695 housing units at an average density of 102 per square mile (39/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.22% White, 3.38% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 2.45% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 1.39% from two or more races. 1.01% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 33,446 households, out of which 24.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.80% were married couples living together, 8.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.70% were non-families. 31.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 18.20% under the age of 18, 23.40% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 20.00% from 45 to 64, and 10.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,625, and the median income for a family was $43,628. Males had a median income of $33,113 versus $23,828 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,106. About 11.30% of families and 22.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.90% of those under age 18 and 8.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 96,189 people, 39,777 households, and 20,032 families living in the county.[10] The population density was 267.1 inhabitants per square mile (103.1 /km2). There were 43,238 housing units at an average density of 120.1 per square mile (46.4 /km2).[11] The racial makeup of the county was 91.0% white, 3.6% black or African American, 3.1% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.8% of the population.[10] In terms of ancestry, 25.7% were German, 17.1% were Irish, 13.0% were English, 11.0% were Italian, 7.5% were American, and 5.0% were Polish.[12]

Of the 39,777 households, 22.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.3% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 49.6% were non-families, and 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age was 29.1 years.[10]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,167 and the median income for a family was $62,966. Males had a median income of $43,383 versus $32,164 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,116. About 8.6% of families and 21.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.[13]

Government and politics[]

The county government consists of a county commission with three members. Currently, these members are: Thomas Bloom (D),[14] Sean Sikora (R) and Jeffery Arnett (D).[15]

In the 20th century, Monongalia County had been a bellwether for West Virginia, voting the same as the state in every election from 1916 to 2020, even as the candidate lost the national election, with the sole exception of 2008 when Barack Obama won the county and lost the state. While still typically favoring Republicans, the county tends to lean significantly more Democratic than the rest of West Virginia. Donald Trump carried the county with just over 500 more votes than Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, by far Biden's best county-level performance in the state.

United States presidential election results for Monongalia County, West Virginia[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 20,803 49.44% 20,282 48.20% 994 2.36%
2016 18,432 50.13% 14,699 39.97% 3,641 9.90%
2012 16,831 53.28% 13,826 43.77% 934 2.96%
2008 15,775 46.99% 17,060 50.82% 734 2.19%
2004 17,670 51.51% 16,313 47.55% 323 0.94%
2000 13,595 49.68% 12,603 46.05% 1,169 4.27%
1996 10,189 37.99% 13,406 49.99% 3,225 12.02%
1992 9,831 34.35% 14,142 49.41% 4,650 16.25%
1988 12,091 45.91% 14,178 53.83% 69 0.26%
1984 14,972 52.95% 13,236 46.81% 66 0.23%
1980 11,972 43.02% 12,883 46.30% 2,971 10.68%
1976 11,827 42.25% 16,163 57.75% 0 0.00%
1972 16,758 60.98% 10,721 39.02% 0 0.00%
1968 9,261 38.68% 13,128 54.83% 1,556 6.50%
1964 6,473 27.16% 17,358 72.84% 0 0.00%
1960 11,523 46.79% 13,103 53.21% 0 0.00%
1956 14,046 56.05% 11,016 43.95% 0 0.00%
1952 13,111 49.92% 13,152 50.08% 0 0.00%
1948 9,329 43.02% 12,138 55.98% 216 1.00%
1944 9,647 48.05% 10,429 51.95% 0 0.00%
1940 10,367 44.48% 12,940 55.52% 0 0.00%
1936 8,811 39.02% 13,677 60.57% 94 0.42%
1932 8,417 43.79% 10,319 53.69% 485 2.52%
1928 11,364 64.08% 6,182 34.86% 188 1.06%
1924 6,994 49.57% 4,977 35.27% 2,139 15.16%
1920 6,773 63.99% 3,442 32.52% 369 3.49%
1916 3,412 57.48% 2,227 37.52% 297 5.00%
1912 1,216 23.20% 1,673 31.92% 2,352 44.88%



Education[]

The county's public schools are operated by Monongalia County Schools. The county is also home to West Virginia's largest university, West Virginia University, located in Morgantown.

Communities[]

Cities[]

Towns[]

  • Blacksville
  • Granville
  • Star City

Magisterial districts[]

  • Central
  • Eastern
  • Western

Census-designated places[]

  • Brookhaven
  • Cassville
  • Cheat Lake
  • Pentress

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Arnettsville
  • Baker Ridge
  • Behler
  • Bertha Hill
  • Booth
  • Bowlby
  • Brewer Hill
  • Browns Chapel
  • Bula
  • Canyon
  • Cheat Neck
  • Chestnut Ridge
  • Clinton Furnace
  • Core
  • Crossroads
  • Crown
  • Daybrook
  • Dellslow
  • Delmar
  • Easton
  • Edna
  • Everettville
  • Fieldcrest
  • Flaggy Meadow
  • Fort Grand
  • Fort Martin
  • Georgetown
  • Greer
  • Greystone
  • Gum Spring
  • Hagans
  • Halleck
  • Harmony Grove
  • Hilderbrand
  • Hoard
  • Hog Eye
  • Holman
  • Hunting Hills
  • Jaco
  • Jakes Run
  • Jere
  • Kimberly
  • Klondike
  • Laurel Point
  • Little Falls
  • Lowsville
  • Macdale
  • Maidsville
  • Maple
  • McCurdyville
  • McMellin
  • Miracle Run
  • Mooresville
  • Morgan Heights
  • National
  • New Hill
  • Opekiska
  • Osage
  • Osgood
  • Pedlar
  • Pierpont
  • Pioneer Rocks
  • Price
  • Price Hill
  • Pursglove
  • Ragtown
  • Randall
  • Richard
  • Ridgedale
  • Ringgold
  • Rock Forge
  • Rosedale
  • Sabraton
  • Saint Cloud
  • Saint Leo
  • Sandy
  • Smithtown
  • Stewartstown
  • Suncrest Lake
  • Sunset Beach
  • Sturgisson
  • The Mileground
  • Triune
  • Tyrone
  • Uffington
  • Van Voorhis
  • Wadestown
  • Wana
  • West Sabraton
  • West Van Voorhis
  • Worley

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Monongalia County, West Virginia
  • Snake Hill Wildlife Management Area
  • West Virginia University
  • Murder of Skylar Neese

Other sources[]

  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. I: Prelude (1974), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. II: The Pioneers (1976), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. III: Discord (1979), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. IV: Industrialization (1984), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. V: Sophistication (1984), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.

References[]

  1. ^ a b "WV Census Data". https://www.census.gov/library/visualizations/interactive/2020-population-and-housing-state-data.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Otis K. Rice & Stephen W. Brown, West Virginia: A History, 2nd ed., University Press of Kentucky, Lexington (1993), p. 240.
  4. ^ United States Census Bureau, U.S. Decennial Census, Tables of Minor Civil Divisions in West Virginia, 1870–2010.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/wv190090.txt. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  10. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US54061. 
  11. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US54061. 
  12. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US54061. 
  13. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US54061. 
  14. ^ "WV SOS - Elections - Election Results - Online Data Services". http://apps.sos.wv.gov/elections/results/results.aspx?year=&eid=13&county=Monongalia&type=OFFICIAL. 
  15. ^ "Historical Election Results". https://www.monongaliacountyclerk.com/index.php/elections/18-previous-elections/33-historical-election-results. 
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 39°38′N 80°03′W / 39.63, -80.05


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Monongalia County, West Virginia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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