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Monroe County, Ohio
Monroe County Courthouse, Woodsfield.jpg
Monroe County Courthouse
Seal of Monroe County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Monroe County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 1, 1815
Named for James Monroe
Seat Woodsfield
Largest village Woodsfield
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

457 sq mi (1,184 km²)
456 sq mi (1,181 km²)
1.7 sq mi (4 km²), 0.4%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

13,385
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.monroecountyohio.net/

Monroe County is a county located on the eastern border of the U.S. state of Ohio, across the Ohio River from West Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 13,385,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Woodsfield.[2] The county was created in 1813 and later organized in 1815.[3]

History[]

Hill farms in Monroe County, 1923

Monroe County was formed on January 28, 1813 from portions of Belmont, Guernsey and Washington counties. It was named after James Monroe, the U.S. Secretary of State when the county was formed, and later fifth President of the United States.[4] When organized, the county's eastern border was with the state of Virginia. This portion of the state seceded from Virginia during the American Civil War, being admitted to the Union as the state of West Virginia. The largely rural county reached its peak of population in the 19th century, before urbanization drew people into and near cities for work and other opportunities. It is still a center of Amish population and farms.

In 1891, West Virginia's Sistersville Field was discovered to extend into Monroe County. By 1901, 300 wells near Woodsfield, Ohio, were producing 55,000 barrels of oil a month.[5]

On or about December 20, 2011, ExxonMobil, a New Jersey petroleum company, via its subsidiary XTO Energy, acquired 20,056 acres of Monroe County Utica Shale gas leases from Beck Energy.[6]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 457 square miles (1,180 km2), of which 456 square miles (1,180 km2) is land and 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2) (0.4%) is water.[7] It is bordered by the Ohio River to the east. The terrain is hilly in this area, with waterways cutting through some hills of the Appalachian Plateau, which extends from Lake Erie to the Ohio River, which flows southwest to the south of this county.

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/OH/link OH|Template:Infobox road/OH/abbrev OH]]

National protected area[]

  • Wayne National Forest (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 4,645
1830 8,768 88.8%
1840 18,521 111.2%
1850 28,351 53.1%
1860 25,741 −9.2%
1870 25,779 0.1%
1880 26,496 2.8%
1890 25,175 −5.0%
1900 27,031 7.4%
1910 24,244 −10.3%
1920 20,660 −14.8%
1930 18,426 −10.8%
1940 18,641 1.2%
1950 15,362 −17.6%
1960 15,268 −0.6%
1970 15,739 3.1%
1980 17,382 10.4%
1990 15,497 −10.8%
2000 15,180 −2.0%
2010 14,642 −3.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2020 [12]

2000 census[]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 15,180 people, 6,021 households, and 4,413 families living in the county. The population density was 33 people per square mile (13/km2). There were 7,212 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.72% White, 0.26% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.41% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,021 households, out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.70% were married couples living together, 8.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.70% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.60% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 25.90% from 25 to 44, 27.20% from 45 to 64, and 16.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 97.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,467, and the median income for a family was $36,297. Males had a median income of $33,308 versus $19,628 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,096. About 11.00% of families and 13.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.30% of those under age 18 and 11.40% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,642 people, 6,065 households, and 4,183 families living in the county.[14] The population density was 32.1 inhabitants per square mile (12.4 /km2). There were 7,567 housing units at an average density of 16.6 per square mile (6.4 /km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 98.1% white, 0.4% black or African American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% American Indian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.4% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 34.8% were German, 14.5% were Irish, 10.6% were English, and 9.6% were American.[16]

Of the 6,065 households, 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.0% were non-families, and 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age was 44.7 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $37,030 and the median income for a family was $43,261. Males had a median income of $39,261 versus $24,922 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,738. About 12.3% of families and 17.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Politics[]

Results from the 2020 Presidential Election in Woodsfield, the county's largest village.

As was typical for Appalachian counties, Monroe County voted Democratic in most elections -- all but 7 times from 1856 until 2008. In 2012, it voted Republican for the first time since 1972. In 2016, it took a sharp turn to the right, voting for Donald Trump by a large margin. In the 2014 gubernatorial election, Monroe was one of two counties to vote for Democrat Ed FitzGerald over Republican John Kasich (along with Athens County). However, in 2018 it voted for Republican Mike DeWine over Democrat Richard Cordray.

United States presidential election results for Monroe County, Ohio[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,463 76.31% 1,605 22.42% 91 1.27%
2016 4,868 71.03% 1,662 24.25% 323 4.71%
2012 3,548 52.31% 3,035 44.75% 199 2.93%
2008 3,066 43.91% 3,705 53.07% 211 3.02%
2004 3,424 44.30% 4,243 54.90% 62 0.80%
2000 3,145 44.20% 3,605 50.67% 365 5.13%
1996 1,856 26.64% 3,914 56.18% 1,197 17.18%
1992 1,823 24.02% 4,235 55.79% 1,533 20.19%
1988 2,557 37.20% 4,269 62.10% 48 0.70%
1984 3,302 47.32% 3,611 51.75% 65 0.93%
1980 2,870 45.03% 3,166 49.68% 337 5.29%
1976 2,728 38.25% 4,296 60.24% 108 1.51%
1972 3,721 59.14% 2,483 39.46% 88 1.40%
1968 2,686 42.27% 3,105 48.87% 563 8.86%
1964 1,944 28.93% 4,776 71.07% 0 0.00%
1960 4,106 56.63% 3,144 43.37% 0 0.00%
1956 3,738 59.18% 2,578 40.82% 0 0.00%
1952 3,493 52.09% 3,213 47.91% 0 0.00%
1948 2,574 39.88% 3,873 60.01% 7 0.11%
1944 3,617 50.30% 3,574 49.70% 0 0.00%
1940 4,534 52.28% 4,138 47.72% 0 0.00%
1936 3,211 36.87% 5,368 61.64% 130 1.49%
1932 2,767 33.97% 5,263 64.61% 116 1.42%
1928 4,287 60.73% 2,729 38.66% 43 0.61%
1924 2,674 40.58% 3,742 56.79% 173 2.63%
1920 2,825 41.94% 3,861 57.32% 50 0.74%
1916 1,504 30.61% 3,322 67.62% 87 1.77%
1912 1,055 21.79% 3,199 66.08% 587 12.13%
1908 1,974 32.74% 3,961 65.69% 95 1.58%
1904 2,222 40.17% 3,169 57.30% 140 2.53%
1900 2,103 33.33% 4,143 65.66% 64 1.01%
1896 2,001 32.07% 4,180 67.00% 58 0.93%
1892 1,630 29.08% 3,838 68.47% 137 2.44%
1888 1,621 29.04% 3,886 69.63% 74 1.33%
1884 1,645 28.99% 4,010 70.66% 20 0.35%
1880 1,600 29.30% 3,751 68.70% 109 2.00%
1876 1,462 27.71% 3,805 72.11% 10 0.19%
1872 1,307 30.74% 2,878 67.69% 67 1.58%
1868 1,443 29.81% 3,397 70.19% 0 0.00%
1864 1,440 31.03% 3,201 68.97% 0 0.00%
1860 1,335 28.57% 3,147 67.36% 190 4.07%
1856 1,016 23.96% 2,812 66.31% 413 9.74%



Government[]

Monroe County has three County Commissioners who oversee the various County departments, similar to 85 of the other 88 Ohio counties. Current Commissioners are: Mick Schumacher (R), Bill Bolon (R), and Diane Burkhart (R).[19]

Monroe County is served by the Monroe County District Library from its administrative offices in Woodsfield, Ohio; it also offers a bookmobile service.

In 2005, the library loaned more than 141,000 items to its 6,000 cardholders. Total holding are over 64,000 volumes with over 140 periodical subscriptions.[20] This library is a member of the SOLO Regional Library System.

Education[]

Monroe County contains the following schools through the Switzerland of Ohio Local School District:

  • Elementary Schools
    • Beallsville Elementary School in Beallsville, Ohio
    • River Elementary School in Hannibal, Ohio
    • Skyvue Elementary School in Graysville, Ohio
    • Woodsfield Elementary School in Woodsfield, Ohio
    • St. Sylvester Central in Woodsfield, Ohio
  • High Schools
    • Monroe Central High School in Woodsfield, Ohio
    • River High School in Hannibal, Ohio
    • Beallsville High School in Beallsville, Ohio
  • Career Center
    • Swiss Hills Career Center in Woodsfield, Ohio

Communities[]

Map of Monroe County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Villages[]

  • Antioch
  • Beallsville
  • Clarington
  • Graysville
  • Jerusalem
  • Lewisville
  • Miltonsburg
  • Stafford
  • Wilson
  • Woodsfield (county seat)

Townships[]

  • Adams
  • Benton
  • Bethel
  • Center
  • Franklin
  • Green
  • Jackson
  • Lee
  • Malaga
  • Ohio
  • Perry
  • Salem
  • Seneca
  • Summit
  • Sunsbury
  • Switzerland
  • Washington
  • Wayne

Census-designated places[]

  • Hannibal
  • Sardis

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Alexis
  • Altitude
  • Brownsville
  • Calais
  • Cameron
  • Duffy
  • Fly
  • Greenbrier
  • Herlan
  • Jericho
  • Laings
  • Malaga
  • Marr
  • Ozark
  • Rinard Mills
  • Round Bottom
  • Swazey
  • Sycamore Valley
  • Trail Run
  • Wittens

Ghost towns[]

  • Agin
  • Aitch
  • Benwood
  • Bingham
  • Brister
  • Burkhart
  • Carrick
  • Cline
  • Doherty
  • Edwina
  • Ethel
  • Griffith
  • Hartshorn
  • Irish Ridge
  • Jolly
  • Masterton
  • Monroefield
  • Morton
  • Oak
  • Poulton
  • Quarry
  • Rings Mill
  • Sprague
  • Switzer
  • Twilight

Notable people[]

  • Philip Allen, member of the Wisconsin State Assembly.[21]
  • William C. Chynoweth. member of the Illinois House of Representatives[22]
  • Sam V. Stewart, Montana Supreme Court Justice and the sixth Governor of Montana.[23]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Monroe County, Ohio
  • Petroleum industry in Ohio

References[]

  1. ^ 2020 census
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Ohio: Individual County Chronologies". Ohio Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/OH_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  4. ^ "Monroe County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39111&sid=0. 
  5. ^ Spencer, Jeff; Camp, Mark (2008). Ohio Oil and Gas (Images of America). Charleston: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 9. ISBN 9780738551715. 
  6. ^ Correction: Exxon Buys 25K Acres of Utica Shale Leases in OH, Marcellus Drilling News
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ 2020 census
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39111. 
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39111. 
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39111. 
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39111. 
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  19. ^ "Government-Monroe County Commissioners". Monroe County Ohio Homepage. http://www.monroecountyohio.net/government/commissioners/index.php. 
  20. ^ "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. http://winslo.state.oh.us/publib/2005_stats_by_county.xls. 
  21. ^ THE BLUE BOOK OF THE STATE OF WISCONSIN. 1889. p. 508. 
  22. ^ 'Illinois Blue Book 1933-1934,' Biographical Sketch of W. C. Chynoweth, pg. 170-171
  23. ^ "Montana Governor Samuel Vernon Stewart". National Governors Association. http://www.nga.org/cms/home/governors/past-governors-bios/page_montana/col2-content/main-content-list/title_stewart_samuel.html. 

Further reading[]

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links[]

Coordinates: 39°44′N 81°05′W / 39.73, -81.08

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