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Montgomery County, Tennessee
ClarksvilleCourt2.jpg
Montgomery County Courthouse in Clarksville
Seal of Montgomery County, Tennessee
Seal
Logo of Montgomery County, Tennessee
Logo
Map of Tennessee highlighting Montgomery County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the U.S. highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Founded 9 April 1796
Named for John Montgomery[1]
Seat Clarksville
Largest city Clarksville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

544 sq mi (1,409 km²)
539 sq mi (1,396 km²)
4.7 sq mi (12 km²), 0.9%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

220,069
388/sq mi (150/km²)
Congressional district 7th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website https://mcgtn.org

Montgomery County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 United States census, the population was 220,069.[2] The county seat (and only incorporated municipality) is Clarksville.[3] The county was created in 1796.[4][5] Montgomery County is included in the Clarksville, TN–KY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

The county was named for John Montgomery, a soldier in the American Revolutionary War and an early settler who founded the city of Clarksville. It was authorized on 9 April 1796, when the western portion of Tennessee County, which since 1790 had been part of the Territory South of the River Ohio, became part of the new state of Tennessee. (In 1790, North Carolina had ceded its western lands to the Federal government to create what was also known as the Southwest Territory.) The eastern portion of old Tennessee County was, at the same time Montgomery County was formed, combined with land taken from Sumner County to form Robertson County, Tennessee. Later acts of the Tennessee General Assembly had further reduced Montgomery County by 1871 to its current size and boundaries.[5]

Montgomery County was the site of several early saltpeter mines. Saltpeter is the main ingredient of gunpowder and was obtained by leaching the earth from local caves. Bellamy Cave near Stringtown still contains the remains of two dozen saltpeter leaching vats. It appears to have been a large operation. Cooper Creek Cave shows evidence of extensive mining and contains the remains of "many saltpeter hoppers". Both were probably mined during the War of 1812. Dunbar Cave is reported to have been mined for saltpeter during the Mexican War of 1848, but commercial development has destroyed any evidence of this. Little mining is likely to have happened here during the Civil War, since the Union Army captured and occupied this part of Tennessee in early 1862.[6]

Geography[]

Montgomery County lies on the north line of Tennessee; its north border abuts the state of Kentucky. The hilly terrain is marked by drainages and largely covered with trees. The Cumberland River meanders westward through the lower central part of the county.[7] The highest point on the county terrain (806 feet/246 meters ASL) is a small hill 3.7 miles (5.9 km) ENE from Slayden in Dickson County.[8]

According to the US Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 544 square miles (1,410 km2), of which 539 square miles (1,400 km2) is land and 4.7 square miles (12 km2) (0.9%) is water.[9]

Dunbar Cave[]

Montgomery County lies in a region of well-developed karst topography. A large cave system under the county is named Dunbar Cave; it is the centerpiece of Dunbar Cave State Park, which encompasses approximately 110 acres and is one of the most visited units in the Tennessee State Park System.

Dunbar Cave was extensively used by prehistoric Indians, who inhabited this area for thousands of years before European encounter. Remains of their cane torches have been found in the cave, and archaeologists have excavated numerous artifacts inside the entrance.[10] During a research trip into the cave on January 15, 2005, Park Ranger Amy Wallace, History professor Joe Douglas, local historian Billyfrank Morrison, and Geologist Larry E. Matthews, discovered Indian glyphs on the walls of the cave. Subsequent investigations by archaeologists from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville confirmed the drawings were from people of the Mississippian culture, which was active about 1000-1300 CE.[11][12] These glyphs were featured for a few years on the tour of the cave.

In 2010, the State of Tennessee closed Dunbar Cave to the public because White Nose Syndrome was diagnosed in a bat and they did not want the disease to spread. The cave has since reopened and tours are conducted seasonally, from May to August (with special hygiene procedures in place).[13]

Adjacent counties[]

Protected areas[]

  • Barnett's Woods State Natural Area
  • Dunbar Cave State Natural Area
  • Dunbar Cave State Park
  • Haynes Bottom Wildlife Management Area
  • Port Royal State Park (part)
  • Shelton Ferry Wildlife Management Area

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1800 2,899
1810 8,021 176.7%
1820 12,219 52.3%
1830 14,349 17.4%
1840 16,927 18.0%
1850 21,045 24.3%
1860 20,895 −0.7%
1870 24,747 18.4%
1880 28,481 15.1%
1890 29,697 4.3%
1900 36,017 21.3%
1910 33,672 −6.5%
1920 32,265 −4.2%
1930 30,882 −4.3%
1940 33,346 8.0%
1950 44,186 32.5%
1960 55,645 25.9%
1970 62,721 12.7%
1980 83,342 32.9%
1990 100,498 20.6%
2000 134,768 34.1%
2010 172,331 27.9%
US Decennial Census[14]
1790-1960[15] 1900-1990[16]
1990-2000[17] 2010-2020[2]

Age pyramid Montgomery County[18]

As of the 2000 United States Census,[19] there were 134,768 people, 48,330 households, and 35,957 families in the county. The population density was 250 people per square mile (96/km2). There were 52,167 housing units at an average density of 97 per square mile (37/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 73.17% White, 19.18% Black or African American, 0.53% Native American, 1.82% Asian, 0.21% Pacific Islander, 2.18% from other races, and 2.91% from two or more races. 5.16% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 48,330 households, out of which 40.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.70% were married couples living together, 12.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.60% were non-families. 20.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.11.

The county population contained 28.40% under the age of 18, 12.30% from 18 to 24, 34.30% from 25 to 44, 17.20% from 45 to 64, and 7.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,981, and the median income for a family was $43,023. Males had a median income of $30,696 versus $22,581 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,265. About 7.90% of families and 10.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.70% of those under age 18 and 10.70% of those age 65 or over.

Government[]

United States presidential election results for Montgomery County, Tennessee[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 42,187 54.96% 32,472 42.30% 2,099 2.73%
2016 32,341 56.13% 21,699 37.66% 3,580 6.21%
2012 30,245 54.28% 24,499 43.97% 976 1.75%
2008 30,175 53.28% 25,716 45.40% 748 1.32%
2004 28,627 58.42% 20,070 40.96% 301 0.61%
2000 19,644 50.31% 18,818 48.20% 582 1.49%
1996 15,133 45.01% 16,498 49.06% 1,994 5.93%
1992 13,011 41.51% 14,507 46.29% 3,823 12.20%
1988 12,599 57.65% 9,145 41.84% 112 0.51%
1984 13,228 56.61% 9,939 42.54% 198 0.85%
1980 8,503 41.08% 11,573 55.91% 622 3.01%
1976 5,923 32.11% 12,310 66.73% 215 1.17%
1972 7,839 56.40% 5,691 40.95% 369 2.65%
1968 3,248 22.52% 5,538 38.39% 5,638 39.09%
1964 2,814 21.66% 10,178 78.34% 0 0.00%
1960 2,550 24.83% 7,635 74.34% 85 0.83%
1956 2,778 25.41% 8,034 73.48% 122 1.12%
1952 2,573 30.78% 5,759 68.90% 27 0.32%
1948 646 14.34% 3,310 73.47% 549 12.19%
1944 702 19.05% 2,971 80.60% 13 0.35%
1940 819 20.53% 3,158 79.15% 13 0.33%
1936 838 20.05% 3,314 79.28% 28 0.67%
1932 799 22.53% 2,747 77.47% 0 0.00%
1928 1,743 48.30% 1,866 51.70% 0 0.00%
1924 941 32.00% 1,946 66.17% 54 1.84%
1920 1,780 40.60% 2,564 58.49% 40 0.91%
1916 991 32.83% 1,976 65.45% 52 1.72%
1912 514 21.13% 1,638 67.32% 281 11.55%
1908 1,903 38.67% 2,961 60.17% 57 1.16%
1904 843 31.41% 1,697 63.23% 144 5.37%
1900 1,815 41.42% 2,248 51.30% 319 7.28%
1896 2,934 48.17% 2,804 46.04% 353 5.80%
1892 1,927 35.46% 2,405 44.25% 1,103 20.29%
1888 2,164 44.08% 2,628 53.53% 117 2.38%
1884 1,922 43.07% 2,516 56.37% 25 0.56%
1880 2,039 41.74% 2,846 58.26% 0 0.00%



The County Commission has 21 members, each elected from a single-member district. In addition, voters elect a County Mayor at-large and certain other county-level positions, including the sheriff.

Communities[]

Clarksville

City[]

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Cunningham
  • Needmore
  • New Providence
  • Oakridge
  • Palmyra
  • Port Royal
  • Salem
  • Sango
  • Shady Grove
  • South Guthrie
  • Southaven
  • Southside
  • St. Bethlehem
  • Woodlawn

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Montgomery County, Tennessee

References[]

  1. ^ Williams, Eleanor. Montgomery County, Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and CultureTemplate:Retrieved.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/47/47125.html. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "Tennessee: Individual County Chronologies". The Newberry Library. 2007. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/TN_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  5. ^ a b "Origins Of Tennessee County Names". Tennessee Blue Book. 2005–2006. p. 512. http://www.state.tn.us/sos/bluebook/05-06/44-counties.pdf. 
  6. ^ Matthews, Larry E. Dunbar Cave: The Showplace of the South, 2011, ISBN 978-1-879961-41-8
  7. ^ Montgomery County TN (Google Maps, accessed 27 August 2020)
  8. ^ Montgomery County High Point, Tennessee (PeakBagger.com, accessed 27 August 2020)
  9. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_47.txt. 
  10. ^ Matthews, Larry E. Dunbar Cave, 2005, ISBN 1-879961-22-9.
  11. ^ Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, v. 74, no. 1, pp. 19–32. DOI: 10.4311/
  12. ^ Jan F. Simek, Joseph C. Douglas, and Amy Wallace, "Ancient Cave Art at Dunbar Cave State Natural Area", Tennessee Conservationist Magazine, September/October 2007, pp. 24–26.
  13. ^ Dunbar Cave - Tennessee State Park System - Cave tours (accessed 27 August 2020)
  14. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  15. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  16. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/tn190090.txt. 
  17. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  18. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  19. ^ "US Census website". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

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Coordinates: 36°30′N 87°23′W / 36.50, -87.38


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Montgomery County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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