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Morrow County, Ohio
Mount-gilead-ohio-courthouse.jpg
Morrow County Courthouse
Seal of Morrow County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Morrow County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 1, 1848[1]
Named for Jeremiah Morrow
Seat Mount Gilead
Largest village Mount Gilead
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

407 sq mi (1,054 km²)
406 sq mi (1,052 km²)
1.1 sq mi (3 km²), 0.3%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

34,950
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 12th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.morrowcountyohio.gov

Old Morrow County Jail

Morrow County is a county located in the central portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 34,950.[2] Its county seat is Mount Gilead.[3] The county was organized in 1848 from parts of four neighboring counties and named for Jeremiah Morrow who was the Governor of Ohio from 1822 to 1826. Shawnee people used the area for hunting purposes before white settlers arrived in the early 19th century.

Morrow County is included in the Columbus, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area.

In 2010, the center of population of Ohio was located in Morrow County, near the village of Marengo.[4]

Morrow County's historic World War I Victory Shaft, unique in the United States, is located in the center of downtown Mount Gilead. Other areas interesting to the tourist include: Mount Gilead State Park; Amish farms and businesses near Johnsville and Chesterville; the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course near Steam Corners; the rolling Allegheny foothills of eastern Morrow County; the site of the birthplace of President Warren G. Harding near Blooming Grove; the site of the former Ohio Central College in Iberia; the early 19th-century architecture of buildings in Chesterville, Ohio; the Revolutionary War Soldiers' Memorial in Mount Gilead; the Civil War monument in Cardington; and the mid-19th-century architecture of the Morrow County Courthouse and Old Jail in Mount Gilead.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 407 square miles (1,050 km2), of which 406 square miles (1,050 km2) is land and 1.1 square miles (2.8 km2) (0.3%) is water.[5] Morrow County is considered to be a part of "Mid Ohio."

Adjacent counties[]

Water features[]

Ossing Run
Length 1.6 mi (2.6 km)

Ossing Run is a tributary of Shaw Creek that flows through Morrow County, Ohio.[6] Shaw Creek flows into Whetstone Creek which is located adjacent to Cardington, Ohio. The United States Geological Survey’s Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) classifies Ossing Run as a stream with an identification number of 2761345. The feature name was entered into the GNIS system in April 2014.[7]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 20,280
1860 20,445 0.8%
1870 18,583 −9.1%
1880 19,072 2.6%
1890 18,120 −5.0%
1900 17,879 −1.3%
1910 16,815 −6.0%
1920 15,570 −7.4%
1930 14,489 −6.9%
1940 15,646 8.0%
1950 17,168 9.7%
1960 19,405 13.0%
1970 21,348 10.0%
1980 26,480 24.0%
1990 27,749 4.8%
2000 31,628 14.0%
2010 34,827 10.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2020 [12]

2000 census[]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 31,628 people, 11,499 households, and 8,854 families living in the county. The population density was 78 people per square mile (30/km2). There were 12,132 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.37% White, 0.27% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.18% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. 0.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 11,499 households, out of which 35.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.60% were married couples living together, 8.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.00% were non-families. 19.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.30% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 29.30% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 11.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,882, and the median income for a family was $45,747. Males had a median income of $33,129 versus $22,454 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,830. About 6.60% of families and 9.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.40% of those under age 18 and 7.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 34,827 people, 12,855 households, and 9,578 families living in the county.[14] The population density was 85.8 inhabitants per square mile (33.1 /km2). There were 14,155 housing units at an average density of 34.9 per square mile (13.5 /km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 97.7% white, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.1% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 30.8% were German, 16.1% were American, 14.4% were Irish, and 13.3% were English.[16]

Of the 12,855 households, 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.5% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 25.5% were non-families, and 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age was 39.5 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $49,891 and the median income for a family was $55,980. Males had a median income of $41,096 versus $32,911 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,795. About 7.5% of families and 10.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.9% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Politics[]

Morrow County is a Republican stronghold county. The last time it voted for a Democratic candidate was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.

United States presidential election results for Morrow County, Ohio[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 14,077 76.22% 4,048 21.92% 343 1.86%
2016 11,948 71.60% 3,761 22.54% 979 5.87%
2012 9,865 60.83% 5,933 36.59% 419 2.58%
2008 10,067 60.36% 6,177 37.03% 435 2.61%
2004 10,474 64.15% 5,775 35.37% 79 0.48%
2000 7,842 61.08% 4,529 35.28% 468 3.65%
1996 5,655 46.07% 4,627 37.69% 1,993 16.24%
1992 5,208 40.72% 3,907 30.54% 3,676 28.74%
1988 7,130 66.26% 3,515 32.67% 115 1.07%
1984 8,116 73.50% 2,839 25.71% 87 0.79%
1980 6,179 61.96% 3,239 32.48% 554 5.56%
1976 5,814 53.28% 4,870 44.63% 228 2.09%
1972 6,886 70.56% 2,527 25.89% 346 3.55%
1968 4,898 55.58% 2,405 27.29% 1,509 17.12%
1964 4,194 47.84% 4,572 52.16% 0 0.00%
1960 6,357 69.91% 2,736 30.09% 0 0.00%
1956 5,885 71.56% 2,339 28.44% 0 0.00%
1952 6,106 71.96% 2,379 28.04% 0 0.00%
1948 4,327 62.21% 2,616 37.61% 12 0.17%
1944 5,439 69.78% 2,356 30.22% 0 0.00%
1940 5,457 62.93% 3,215 37.07% 0 0.00%
1936 4,086 49.52% 3,947 47.83% 219 2.65%
1932 3,811 48.82% 3,849 49.31% 146 1.87%
1928 4,801 71.67% 1,818 27.14% 80 1.19%
1924 3,790 57.39% 2,379 36.02% 435 6.59%
1920 4,484 60.78% 2,858 38.74% 36 0.49%
1916 2,062 45.41% 2,345 51.64% 134 2.95%
1912 1,240 27.65% 1,880 41.92% 1,365 30.43%
1908 2,500 51.06% 2,239 45.73% 157 3.21%
1904 2,563 55.18% 1,827 39.33% 255 5.49%
1900 2,605 51.58% 2,278 45.11% 167 3.31%
1896 2,506 48.79% 2,517 49.01% 113 2.20%
1892 2,297 49.07% 1,958 41.83% 426 9.10%
1888 2,514 51.02% 2,068 41.97% 345 7.00%
1884 2,612 52.39% 2,160 43.32% 214 4.29%
1880 2,581 52.92% 2,143 43.94% 153 3.14%
1876 2,450 53.45% 2,046 44.63% 88 1.92%
1872 2,197 55.85% 1,689 42.93% 48 1.22%
1868 2,469 58.24% 1,770 41.76% 0 0.00%
1864 2,366 58.83% 1,656 41.17% 0 0.00%
1860 2,260 53.18% 1,928 45.36% 62 1.46%
1856 2,031 53.46% 1,667 43.88% 101 2.66%



Government[]

Communities[]

Cities[]

  • Galion (part)

Villages[]

  • Cardington
  • Chesterville
  • Edison
  • Fulton
  • Marengo
  • Mount Gilead (county seat)
  • Sparta

Townships[]

  • Bennington
  • Canaan
  • Cardington
  • Chester
  • Congress
  • Franklin
  • Gilead
  • Harmony
  • Lincoln
  • North Bloomfield
  • Perry
  • Peru
  • South Bloomfield
  • Troy
  • Washington
  • Westfield

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated places[]

  • Candlewood Lake
  • Hidden Lakes
  • Iberia

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Bloomfield
  • Blooming Grove
  • Climax
  • Denmark
  • Fargo
  • Johnsville
  • Jugs Corners
  • North Woodbury
  • Pagetown
  • Pulaskiville
  • Russell
  • Saint James
  • Shawtown
  • Shauck
  • South Woodbury
  • Steam Corners
  • Vails Corners
  • West Liberty
  • West Point
  • Westfield
  • Williamsport

Notable residents[]

  • Tim Belcher, former Major League Baseball pitcher
  • Richard Dillingham, Quaker abolitionist
  • Frank W. Gunsaulus, pastor
  • Albert P. Halfhill, businessman, father of the tuna packing industry was born in the county.
  • Warren G. Harding, U.S. President
  • Dawn Powell, author
  • Esther Tuttle Pritchard (1840–1900), minister, editor
  • Samuel Newitt Wood, politician and women's rights advocate

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Morrow County, Ohio

References[]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Morrow County". Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Morrow.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/geo/reference/docs/cenpop2010/CenPop2010_Mean_ST.txt. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  6. ^ (January 22, 2014) "14-R-046". Commissioners' Journal. 
  7. ^ "GNIS". United States Geological Survey. http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=136:1:0:::::. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ 2020 census
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39117. 
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39117. 
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39117. 
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39117. 
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 40°32′N 82°48′W / 40.53, -82.80

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