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Mountrail County, North Dakota
Mountrail County Courthouse - Stanley, North Dakota 10-18-2008.jpg
Mountrail County Courthouse in Stanley
Map of North Dakota highlighting Mountrail County
Location in the state of North Dakota
Map of the U.S. highlighting North Dakota
North Dakota's location in the U.S.
Founded January 4, 1873
1892 (eliminated)
January 29, 1909 (reestablished)
Seat Stanley
Largest city Stanley
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

1,942 sq mi (5,030 km²)
1,825 sq mi (4,727 km²)
116 sq mi (300 km²), 6.0
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

9,809
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website http://www.co.mountrail.nd.us/

Mountrail County is a county in the northwestern part of North Dakota, United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 9,809.[1] Its county seat is Stanley.[2] The county was originally created in 1873, then removed in 1892, annexed by Ward County. It was re-created and organized in 1909.[3][4]

History[]

The Dakota Territory legislature created the county (as Mountraille County) on January 4, 1873, with area annexed from Buffalo County. It was not organized at that time, nor was it attached to another county for administrative or judicial purposes. The new county lost territory in 1885 when a portion was annexed off to create Garfield County (now extinct). This situation continued until February 21, 1891, when Mountrail County was attached to Ward County, for "judicial and other purposes". The following year (November 8, 1892), the North Dakota legislature voted to dissolve the county and have its territory absorbed by Ward County.

An election held in Ward County on November 3, 1908, authorized the re-creation of Mountrail County, although with different boundaries than the previous county proposal. The countywide vote totals were 4207 to 4024, but the result was contested in court. On January 16, 1909, the state Supreme Court upheld the vote, so the county government was organized on January 29 of that year.[4][5][6]

Oil production from the Bakken formation in the early 21st century attracted workers and reversed decades of population decline in the county. From 2010 to 2015, especially, population markedly increased, creating its own strains.

Outline map of Mountrail County, North Dakota, 1917

Geography[]

The Missouri River flows southeastward along the SW boundary line of Mountrail County, and Shell Creek drains the lower central part of the county into the Missouri, discharging at Shell Creek Bay. The terrain consists of rolling hills, largely devoted to agriculture. Its NE portion is dotted with ponds and lakes.[7] The Laurentian Divide runs east–west through the central part of the county, with the northern areas sloping to the north and the southern areas sloping to the south. Its highest point is on the upper west boundary line, at 2,480' (756m) ASL.[8] The county has a total area of 1,942 square miles (5,030 km2), of which 1,825 square miles (4,730 km2) is land and 116 square miles (300 km2) (6.0%) is water.[9]

Mountrail County is one of several western North Dakota counties with significant exposure to the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin.

Major highways[]

  • US 2.svg U.S. Highway 2
  • North Dakota 8.svg North Dakota Highway 8
  • North Dakota 23.svg North Dakota Highway 23
  • North Dakota 37.png North Dakota Highway 37
  • North Dakota 1804.png North Dakota Highway 1804

Adjacent counties[]

Protected areas[7][]

  • Crow Flies High Butte
  • Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • Palermo State Game Management Area
  • Reunion Point Public Use Area
  • Shell Lake National Wildlife Refuge
  • Van Hook State Game Management Area
  • Van Hook State Wildlife Management Area

Lakes[7][]

  • Cottonwood Lake
  • Lake Sakakawea
  • Powers Lake (part)
  • Rat Lake
  • Robinson Lake
  • Shell Lake
  • Van Hook Arm
  • White Lake

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1910 8,491
1920 12,140 43.0%
1930 13,544 11.6%
1940 10,482 −22.6%
1950 9,418 −10.2%
1960 10,077 7.0%
1970 8,437 −16.3%
1980 7,679 −9.0%
1990 7,021 −8.6%
2000 6,631 −5.6%
2010 7,673 15.7%
Est. 2021 9,576 44.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2020[1]

2000 census[]

As of the 2000 census, there were 6,631 people, 2,560 households, and 1,753 families in the county. The population density was 3.63/sqmi (1.40/km2). There were 3,438 housing units at an average density of 1.88/sqmi (0.73/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 65.99% White, 0.09% Black or African American, 29.98% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.26% from other races, and 3.42% from two or more races. 1.31% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 37.1% were of Norwegian and 15.4% German ancestry.

There were 2,560 households, out of which 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 11.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.50% were non-families. 28.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.09.

The county population contained 28.10% under the age of 18, 6.80% from 18 to 24, 23.20% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 17.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,098, and the median income for a family was $31,864. Males had a median income of $24,750 versus $20,844 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,422. About 14.00% of families and 19.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.40% of those under age 18 and 18.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 census, there were 7,673 people, 2,793 households, and 1,852 families in the county.[14] The population density was 4.20/sqmi (1.62/km2). There were 4,119 housing units at an average density of 2.26/sqmi (0.87/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 65.6% white, 30.6% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 0.2% Asian, 0.8% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 3.7% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 36.6% were Norwegian, 24.4% were German, 6.6% were Irish, and 0.8% were American.[16]

Of the 2,793 households, 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.7% were non-families, and 28.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.11. The median age was 37.0 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $53,912 and the median income for a family was $63,238. Males had a median income of $43,386 versus $29,432 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,762. About 13.5% of families and 16.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.2% of those under age 18 and 14.2% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Communities[]

Cities[]

  • New Town
  • Palermo
  • Parshall
  • Plaza
  • Ross
  • Stanley (county seat)
  • White Earth

Unincorporated communities[7][]

  • Belden
  • Blaisdell
  • Coulee
  • Lostwood
  • Lunds Valley
  • Prairie Junction
  • Sanish
  • Tagus
  • Van Hook
  • Wabek Wabek Consolidated School

Townships[]

  • Alger
  • Austin
  • Banner
  • Bicker
  • Big Bend
  • Brookbank
  • Burke
  • Clearwater
  • Cottonwood
  • Crane Creek
  • Crowfoot
  • Debing
  • Egan
  • Fertile
  • Howie
  • Idaho
  • James Hill
  • Kickapoo
  • Knife River
  • Liberty
  • Lostwood
  • Lowland
  • Manitou
  • McAlmond
  • McGahan
  • Model
  • Mountrail
  • Myrtle
  • Oakland
  • Osborn
  • Osloe
  • Palermo
  • Parshall
  • Plaza
  • Powers
  • Powers Lake
  • Purcell
  • Rat Lake
  • Redmond
  • Ross
  • Shell
  • Sidonia
  • Sikes
  • Sorkness
  • Spring Coulee
  • Stave
  • Van Hook
  • Wayzetta
  • White Earth

Politics[]

Mountrail County was historically a swing county, but now leans strongly Republican. Bill Clinton won both of his terms, and Barack Obama carried this county in the 2008 election. However, he wasn't able to carry this county in 2012, falling to Republican Mitt Romney by over 16%. Hillary Clinton received the smallest vote by a Democratic candidate (29.7%) since Progressive Party candidate Robert La Follette received an overwhelming vote in 1924.

United States presidential election results for Mountrail County, North Dakota[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 2,824 67.80% 1,256 30.16% 85 2.04%
2016 2,582 62.88% 1,220 29.71% 304 7.40%
2012 1,962 56.75% 1,403 40.58% 92 2.66%
2008 1,406 47.86% 1,477 50.27% 55 1.87%
2004 1,527 50.40% 1,465 48.35% 38 1.25%
2000 1,466 50.62% 1,256 43.37% 174 6.01%
1996 965 36.90% 1,277 48.83% 373 14.26%
1992 1,017 30.92% 1,393 42.35% 879 26.73%
1988 1,443 41.73% 1,977 57.17% 38 1.10%
1984 1,959 55.11% 1,565 44.02% 31 0.87%
1980 2,165 60.36% 1,183 32.98% 239 6.66%
1976 1,430 38.57% 2,189 59.03% 89 2.40%
1972 2,038 58.30% 1,391 39.79% 67 1.92%
1968 1,494 44.33% 1,662 49.32% 214 6.35%
1964 1,131 30.71% 2,548 69.18% 4 0.11%
1960 1,894 45.50% 2,264 54.38% 5 0.12%
1956 1,699 47.23% 1,891 52.57% 7 0.19%
1952 2,516 62.93% 1,437 35.94% 45 1.13%
1948 1,395 42.22% 1,521 46.04% 388 11.74%
1944 1,666 45.11% 1,981 53.64% 46 1.25%
1940 1,981 44.67% 2,392 53.93% 62 1.40%
1936 700 14.68% 2,775 58.19% 1,294 27.13%
1932 986 22.17% 3,284 73.83% 178 4.00%
1928 2,354 52.30% 2,003 44.50% 144 3.20%
1924 1,354 36.19% 130 3.48% 2,257 60.33%
1920 2,960 72.73% 687 16.88% 423 10.39%
1916 740 32.64% 1,262 55.67% 265 11.69%
1912 407 28.05% 307 21.16% 737 50.79%



See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Mountrail County, North Dakota

References[]

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Mountrail County, North Dakota" (in en). United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/mountrailcountynorthdakota/PST045221. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "County History". North Dakota.gov. The State of North Dakota. http://www.nd.gov/content.htm?parentCatID=83&id=County%20History. 
  4. ^ a b Long, John H. (2006). "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. http://historical-county.newberry.org/website/North_Dakota/documents/DAKs_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  5. ^ "Dakota Territory Historical Counties: Interactive Map". Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. http://historical-county.newberry.org/website/Dakota_Territory/viewer.htm. 
  6. ^ "North Dakota Historical Counties: Interactive Map". Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. http://historical-county.newberry.org/website/North_Dakota/viewer.htm. 
  7. ^ a b c d Mountrail County ND Google Maps (accessed February 25, 2019)
  8. ^ ""Find an Altitude/Mountrail County ND" Google Maps (accessed February 25, 2019)". https://www.daftlogic.com/sandbox-google-maps-find-altitude.htm. 
  9. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_38.txt. 
  10. ^ "United States Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  12. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (April 20, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/nd190090.txt. 
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  14. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US38061. 
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US38061. 
  16. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US38061. 
  17. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US38061. 
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

  • Mountrail County maps, Sheet 1 (northern) and Sheet 2 (southern), North Dakota DOT

Template:Mountrail County, North Dakota

Coordinates: 48°12′N 102°22′W / 48.20, -102.37

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Mountrail County, North Dakota. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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