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  • 2nd Presiding Bishop of LDS Church

Biography

Newel Kimball Whitney was born 5 February 1795 in Marlboro, Windham County, Vermont, United States to Samuel Whitney (1772-1846) and Susannah Kimball (1769-1859) and died 23 September 1850 Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of unspecified causes. He married Elizabeth Ann Smith (1800-1882) 20 October 1822 in Kirtland, Ohio, United States. He married Emmeline Blanche Woodward (1828-1921) 24 February 1845 in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, United States. He married Olive Maria Bishop (1807-1852) 7 January 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, United States. He married Elizabeth Almira Pond (1827-1899) 7 January 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, United States. He married Abigail Augusta Pond (1828-1846) 7 January 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, United States. He married Henrietta Keys (1821-1901) 26 January 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, United States. He married Elizabeth Mahala Moore (1826) 26 January 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, United States. He married Anne Houston (1821-1848) 8 February 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, United States.

Newel Kimball Whitney was a prominent member and leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an American businessman. He married Elizabeth Ann Smith on 20 Oct. 1822, in Geauga County, OH. He served as Bishop of Kirtland, Ohio, Far West, Missouri, and Nauvoo, Illinois. He also served as the second Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1847 until his death. He died in 1850 of pleurisy.

N.K. Whitney Store

N.K. Whitney Store in Kirtland Ohio.

By 1827 Whitney had entered into a partnership with Algernon Sidney Gilbert to run a store in Kirtland known as N.K. Whitney & Co. It would later become Mormonism's first "bishop's storehouse." The building was also used by Church founder and president Joseph Smith (1805-1844) as a home and office. Joseph received 16 revelations (D&C 84 through D&C 98 and D&C 101) in the Whitney Store and used one of the rooms as a meeting place for the School of the Prophets, a place where many spiritual manifestations were received. In D&C 72 he was called to be a bishop, serving alongside Edward Partridge, who was the church's first bishop.

First Lamanite Mission

One of the earliest missionary expeditions of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the First Lamanite Mission commenced in October 1830 in New York with the call of Oliver Cowdery (1806-1850), "second elder" in the Church; Peter Whitmer (1809-1836); Parley P. Pratt (1807-1857); and Ziba Peterson (1810-1849) (D&C 28:8;32:1-3). It initiated the long continuing Church practice of taking the gospel to Native Americans. The Book of Mormon, in part a record of American Indian origins, prophesies that the Lamanites will assist in building the millennial New Jerusalem (3 Ne. 20-21), to be located in the Western Hemisphere (Ether 13:3-6; cf. D&C 28:9). They traveled over a thousand miles in mid-winter weather to indian territory located west of Independence, Missouri.

While not having any notable success with these indeginous people, the missionaries did have some remarkable success with several white settlements along the way, particularly around northeastern Ohio resulting in over 130 converts that included some future leaders of the church and the relocation of the church from New York to Kirtland, Ohio in early 1831. The mission also had success among the settlers in Jackson County, Missouri leading both communities to become important religious centers for the new church.[1][2]

This mission directly led to Newel to joining this new Church along with many associates and family members living in this area.

Nauvoo Era

While in Nauvoo, Illinois, Whitney was involved in some important developments within the Church. One of these occurred on May 4, 1842 when Whitney, along with a group of nine others, met in the upper story of the Red Brick Store. Those who were there, including Whitney, became part of Joseph Smith's Quorum of the Anointed.[2] Later, Whitney's wife, Elizabeth Ann, was added to that group.

Another development was polygamy. In 1842, after being taught the doctrine of polygamy, Whitney and Elizabeth Ann agreed to let their daughter, Sarah Ann Whitney (1825-1873), become a plural wife of Joseph Smith.[3]




Children



Offspring of Newel Kimball Whitney and Elizabeth Ann Smith (1800-1882)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Horace Kimball Whitney (1823-1884) 25 July 1823 Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio, United States 22 November 1884 Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Helen Mar Kimball (1828-1896) Lucy Amelia Bloxham (bef1833-1851) Mary Cravath (1838-1895) Helen Mar Kimball (1828-1896) Lucy Amelia Bloxham (bef1833-1851) Mary Cravath (1838-1895) Mary Bloxum (c1842)
Sarah Ann Whitney (1825-1873) 22 March 1825 Kirtland, Geauga County, Ohio, United States 4 September 1873 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States Joseph Smith (1805-1844) Joseph Corrodon Kingsbury (1812-1898) Joseph Smith (1805-1844) Joseph Corrodon Kingsbury (1812-1898) Heber Chase Kimball (1801-1868)
Moudalina Whitney (1827)
Franklin Kimball Whitney (1827)
Mary Elizabeth Whitney (1828)
Orson Kimball Whitney (1830)
John Kimball Whitney (1832)
Joshua Kimball Whitney (1835)
Anna Maria Whitney (1836)
Don Carlos Whitney (1841)
Mary Jane Whitney (1844)
Newell Melchizedek Whitney (1847)



Offspring of Newel Kimball Whitney and Emmeline Blanche Woodward (1828-1921)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Isabel Modelena Whitney (1848)
Melvina Caroline Whitney (1850)








Offspring of Newel Kimball Whitney and Anne Houston (1821-1848)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Jethro Houston Whitney (1848-1922)



External links

References

    




Footnotes (including sources)

‡ General
  • AWT:db: ldshistorical, id: I13006 — no longer available
  • AWT:db: mjr6387, id: I52224 — no longer available
  • AWT:db: wabarron, id: I14063 — no longer available







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