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Noble County, Ohio
Noble County Courthouse Ohio.jpg
The Noble County Courthouse in Caldwell in 2007
Flag of Noble County, Ohio
Flag
Seal of Noble County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Noble County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded April 1, 1851[1]
Named for either James Noble or Warren P. Noble
Seat Caldwell
Largest village Caldwell
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

405 sq mi (1,049 km²)
398 sq mi (1,031 km²)
6.6 sq mi (17 km²), 1.6%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

14,115
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website https://noblecountyohio.gov/

Noble County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 14,115,[2] making it the fourth-least populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Caldwell.[3] The county is named for Rep. Warren P. Noble of the Ohio House of Representatives, who was an early settler there.[4]

History[]

Noble County was formed on March 11, 1851 from portions of Guernsey, Morgan, Monroe and Washington counties.[5] It was the last and youngest county to be formed in the state.[6][7] It was named for either James Noble or Warren P. Noble, each of whom was an early settler in this region.[8]

Noble County was home to the first North American oil well, the Thorla-McKee Well, which struck oil in 1814.[9] For a time this was a center of oil production in the state.

In 1925, a United States Navy dirigible, USS Shenandoah (ZR-1), was caught in a storm over Noble County. It broke into several pieces, resulting in the deaths of 14 persons on board; 29 survived.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 405 square miles (1,050 km2), of which 398 square miles (1,030 km2) is land and 6.6 square miles (17 km2) (1.6%) is water.[10]

Adjacent counties[]

National protected area[]

  • Wayne National Forest (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1860 20,751
1870 19,949 −3.9%
1880 21,138 6.0%
1890 20,753 −1.8%
1900 19,466 −6.2%
1910 18,601 −4.4%
1920 17,849 −4.0%
1930 14,961 −16.2%
1940 14,587 −2.5%
1950 11,750 −19.4%
1960 10,982 −6.5%
1970 10,428 −5.0%
1980 11,310 8.5%
1990 11,336 0.2%
2000 14,058 24.0%
2010 14,645 4.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
1790-1960[12] 1900-1990[13]
1990-2000[14] 2020 [15]

2000 census[]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 14,058 people, 4,546 households, and 3,318 families living in the county. The population density was 35 people per square mile (14/km2). There were 5,480 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.55% White, 6.69% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.03% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. 0.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,546 households, out of which 33.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.50% were married couples living together, 7.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.00% were non-families. 24.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.60% under the age of 18, 11.70% from 18 to 24, 31.80% from 25 to 44, 20.80% from 45 to 64, and 13.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 130.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 140.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,940, and the median income for a family was $38,939. Males had a median income of $30,911 versus $20,222 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,100. About 8.30% of families and 11.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.90% of those under age 18 and 11.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,645 people, 4,852 households, and 3,394 families living in the county.[17] The population density was 36.8 inhabitants per square mile (14.2 /km2). There were 6,053 housing units at an average density of 15.2 per square mile (5.9 /km2).[18] The racial makeup of the county was 96.1% white, 2.5% black or African American, 0.3% American Indian, 0.1% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.4% of the population.[17] In terms of ancestry, 25.9% were German, 13.1% were Irish, 9.1% were American, and 9.0% were English.[19]

Of the 4,852 households, 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.0% were non-families, and 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.94. The median age was 48.6 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,500 and the median income for a family was $44,773. Males had a median income of $42,456 versus $29,551 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,029. About 11.6% of families and 14.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.9% of those under age 18 and 13.8% of those age 65 or over.[20]

Politics[]

Results from the 2020 Presidential Election in Caldwell, the county's largest Village.

Noble County is a Republican stronghold in presidential elections, although Bill Clinton narrowly won it in 1996.

United States presidential election results for Noble County, Ohio[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,135 80.89% 1,170 18.43% 43 0.68%
2016 4,549 75.33% 1,221 20.22% 269 4.45%
2012 3,563 60.48% 2,131 36.17% 197 3.34%
2008 3,450 55.75% 2,474 39.98% 264 4.27%
2004 3,841 58.73% 2,654 40.58% 45 0.69%
2000 3,435 57.36% 2,296 38.34% 257 4.29%
1996 2,183 39.59% 2,366 42.91% 965 17.50%
1992 2,223 37.79% 2,201 37.41% 1,459 24.80%
1988 3,155 59.44% 2,079 39.17% 74 1.39%
1984 3,853 67.70% 1,777 31.22% 61 1.07%
1980 3,025 57.38% 1,944 36.87% 303 5.75%
1976 3,007 52.48% 2,612 45.58% 111 1.94%
1972 3,274 68.22% 1,449 30.19% 76 1.58%
1968 2,615 53.06% 1,726 35.02% 587 11.91%
1964 2,250 43.48% 2,925 56.52% 0 0.00%
1960 3,951 65.99% 2,036 34.01% 0 0.00%
1956 3,861 66.52% 1,943 33.48% 0 0.00%
1952 4,046 66.33% 2,054 33.67% 0 0.00%
1948 3,494 58.79% 2,425 40.80% 24 0.40%
1944 4,130 64.89% 2,235 35.11% 0 0.00%
1940 4,922 61.84% 3,037 38.16% 0 0.00%
1936 4,384 52.70% 3,865 46.46% 70 0.84%
1932 3,950 49.25% 3,966 49.45% 104 1.30%
1928 4,462 66.45% 2,190 32.61% 63 0.94%
1924 4,284 60.78% 2,485 35.26% 279 3.96%
1920 4,197 59.06% 2,909 40.94% 0 0.00%
1916 2,290 50.33% 2,175 47.80% 85 1.87%
1912 1,804 40.05% 1,842 40.90% 858 19.05%
1908 2,707 54.27% 2,154 43.18% 127 2.55%
1904 2,700 58.90% 1,671 36.45% 213 4.65%
1900 2,704 54.55% 2,173 43.84% 80 1.61%
1896 2,559 51.86% 2,318 46.98% 57 1.16%
1892 2,307 50.69% 2,026 44.52% 218 4.79%
1888 2,515 53.18% 2,087 44.13% 127 2.69%
1884 2,385 52.27% 2,061 45.17% 117 2.56%
1880 2,316 50.55% 2,044 44.61% 222 4.85%
1876 2,225 50.86% 2,096 47.91% 54 1.23%
1872 2,016 54.78% 1,627 44.21% 37 1.01%
1868 2,204 56.24% 1,715 43.76% 0 0.00%
1864 2,211 56.23% 1,721 43.77% 0 0.00%
1860 1,944 52.02% 1,647 44.07% 146 3.91%
1856 1,603 51.81% 1,337 43.21% 154 4.98%



Government[]

Noble County has a three-member Board of County Commissioners that oversee and administer the various County departments, similar to all but two of the 88 Ohio counties. Noble County's elected commissioners are:

  • County Commissioners: Virgil Thompson (R), Brad Peoples (R), and Ty Moore (R).[22]

Education[]

Noble County is served by the Caldwell Exempted Village School District and Noble Local School District.

Communities[]

Map of Noble County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Villages[]

Townships[]

  • Beaver
  • Brookfield
  • Buffalo
  • Center
  • Elk
  • Enoch
  • Jackson
  • Jefferson
  • Marion
  • Noble
  • Olive
  • Seneca
  • Sharon
  • Stock
  • Wayne

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Ava
  • Carlisle
  • Crooked Tree
  • Dudley
  • Dungannon
  • East Union
  • Elk
  • Florence
  • Fulda
  • Gem
  • Harriettsville
  • Hiramsburg
  • Honesty
  • Hoskinsville
  • Keith
  • Kennonsburg
  • Middleburg
  • Moundsville
  • Mount Ephraim
  • Olive Green
  • Rochester
  • Sharon
  • South Olive
  • Steamtown
  • Whigville

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Noble County, Ohio

Footnotes[]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Noble County". Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Noble.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "Noble County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39121&sid=0. 
  5. ^ Noble County, Ohio | Learn | FamilySearch.org
  6. ^ "Noble County". Ohio University Small Business Development Center. http://www.voinovichcenter.ohio.edu/sbdc/countyguide.asp?countyId=6. 
  7. ^ 1832 Ball-Caldwell House in Noble County, Ohio Script error: No such module "webarchive".
  8. ^ Noble County, Ohio definition of Noble County, Ohio in the Free Online Encyclopedia
  9. ^ Thorla-McKee Well, First Oil Well in North America, Noble County, Ohio Script error: No such module "webarchive"., Noble County, 2004. Accessed 2005-08-05.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  13. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  15. ^ 2020 census
  16. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  17. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39121. 
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39121. 
  19. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39121. 
  20. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39121. 
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  22. ^ "Noble County, Ohio". County Commissioner of Ohio Homepage. http://www.ccao.org/ohio-counties?county=noble. 

Further reading[]

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links[]

Coordinates: 39°46′N 81°27′W / 39.77, -81.45

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