Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Passaic County, New Jersey
Seal of Passaic County, New Jersey
Seal
Map of New Jersey highlighting Passaic County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Map of the U.S. highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
Founded February 7, 1837
Seat Paterson
Largest city Paterson
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

197 sq mi (510 km²)
185 sq mi (479 km²)
12 sq mi (31 km²), 5.97%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

524,118
2,709/sq mi (1,046/km²)
Website www.PassaicCountyNJ.org

Bergen and Passaic counties, 1872

Passaic County (play /pəˈs.ɪk/ pə-SAY-ik) is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 524,118. Its county seat is Paterson.[1] It is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area.

Passaic County was created on February 7, 1837, from portions of both Bergen County and Essex County.[2]

Geography[]

The highest point is any one of six areas on Bearfort Ridge in West Milford Township at approximately 1,480 ft (451 m) above sea level. The lowest elevation is approximately 30 ft (9 m) along the Passaic River in Clifton.

The southeastern, more populous half of the county is either flat near the river or mildly hilly. The northwestern section is rugged and mountainous.

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1840 16,734
1850 22,569 34.9%
1860 29,013 28.6%
1870 46,416 60.0%
1880 68,860 48.4%
1890 105,046 52.6%
1900 155,202 47.7%
1910 215,902 39.1%
1920 259,174 20.0%
1930 302,129 16.6%
1940 309,353 2.4%
1950 337,093 9.0%
1960 406,618 20.6%
1970 460,782 13.3%
1980 447,585 −2.9%
1990 453,060 1.2%
2000 489,049 7.9%
2010 501,226 2.5%
historical census data source:[3][4]

[5]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 489,049 people, 163,856 households, and 119,614 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,639 people per square mile (1,019/km²). There were 170,048 housing units at an average density of 918 per square mile (354/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 62.32% White, 13.22% Black or African American, 0.44% Native American, 3.69% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 16.24% from other races, and 4.05% from two or more races. 29.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 16.3% were of Italian, 6.8% Irish, 5.3% German and 5.2% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000.

In 2005 Non-Hispanic whites were estimated to constitute 48.9% of Passaic County's population. This included large numbers of Egyptians. 15.3% of the population was African-American. 4.4% of the population was Asian. 33.9% of the population was Latino. The large amount of Hispanics present in Passaic County can be attributed to the fact that the majority of residents in Paterson and Passaic are Hispanic, and a substantial minority are in Clifton. Throughout the other parts of Passaic county, however, there is a relatively low number of Hispanics present. This last number represented an increase of over 15,000 in the Latino population of the county.[7]

As of the 2000 census There were 163,856 households out of which 35.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.50% were married couples living together, 16.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.00% were non-families. 22.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.42.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.10% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $49,210, and the median income for a family was $56,054. Males had a median income of $38,740 versus $29,954 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,370. About 9.40% of families and 12.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.30% of those under age 18 and 9.20% of those age 65 or over.

Law, government, policing[]

The Passaic County Court House and Administrative Building complex (center) for Passaic County is located in Downtown Paterson.

The Passaic County Court House and Administrative Building complex is located at the county seat in Paterson.[8]

In Passaic County's commission form of government, the Board of Chosen Freeholders discharge both executive and legislative responsibilities. Seven Freeholders are elected at-large for three-year terms on a staggered basis. A Freeholder Director and Freeholder Deputy Director are elected from among the seven Freeholders at an annual reorganization meeting in January.[9] Passaic County operates through six standing committees of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. They are Administration & Finance; Health, Education and Community Affairs; Public Works and Buildings & Grounds; Law & Public Safety; Human Services and Planning and Economic Development. The Freeholders also appoint individuals to departments, agencies, boards and commissions for the effective administration of county government. In 2016, freeholders were paid $28,500 and the freeholder director was paid an annual salary of $29,500.[10] The Freeholders select a County Administrator who, in the role of chief administrative officer, supervises the day-to-day operation of county government and its departments; Anthony J. DeNova III is the County Administrator.[11]

As of 2019, Passaic County's Freeholders are:[12][13][14]

  • Freeholder Director John W. Bartlett (D, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2021 / term as freeholder director ends 2019; Wayne)
  • Freeholder Deputy Director Cassandra "Sandi" Lazzara (D, term as freeholder ends 2021 / term as freeholder deputy director ends 2019; Little Falls)
  • Assad Akhter (D, 2021; Paterson)
  • Theodore O. Best Jr. (D, 2020; Paterson)
  • Terry Duffy (D, 2022; West Milford)
  • Bruce James (D, 2020; Clifton)
  • Pat Lepore (D, 2022; Woodland Park)

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[15] Constitutional officers. elected on a countywide basis are:[14]

  • County Clerk Danielle Ireland-Imhof (D, 2023)[16][17][18]
  • Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik (D, 2022)[19][20]
  • Surrogate Bernice Toledo (D, 2021)[21][22]

The Passaic County Prosecutor is Camelia M. Valdes of Bloomingdale, who was nominated by Governor of New Jersey Jon S. Corzine in May 2009 and renominated by Governor Chris Christie in June 2015.[23][24]

Passaic County constitutes Vicinage 11 of the New Jersey Superior Court and is seated at the Passaic County Courthouse in Paterson; the Assignment Judge for Vicinage 11 is Ernest M. Caposela.[25] Law enforcement at the county level is provided by the Passaic County Sheriff and the Passaic County Prosecutor's Office.

Federal Representatives[]

Three federal Congressional Districts cover the county, with most of the northern portion of the county in the 5th District, most of the southern portion of the county in the 9th District and the central portion of the county in the 11th District.[26][27] Template:NJ Congress 05 Template:NJ Congress 09 New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).

State Representatives[]

The 16 municipalities of Passaic County are represented by seven separate legislative districts[28]

District Senator[29] Assembly[29] Municipalities
26th Joseph Pennacchio (R) BettyLou Decroce (R)

Jay Webber (R)

West Millford (26,856).

The remainder of this district covers portions of Essex County and Morris County.

34th Nia Gill (D) Thomas P. Giblin (D)

Britnee Timberlake (D)

Clifton (86,607). The remainder of this district covers portions of Essex County
35th Nellie Pou (D) Shavonda E. Sumter (D)

Benjie E. Wimberly (D)

Haledon (8,463), North Haledon (8,570), Paterson (148,678) and Prospect Park (5,964).

The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.

38th Joseph Lagana (D) Lisa Swain (D)

Chris Tully (D)

Hawthorne (19,101). The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.
36th Paul Sarlo (D) Gary Schaer (D)

Clinton Calabrese (D)

Passaic (71,247). The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.
39th Holly Schepisi (R) Robert Auth (R)

DeAnne DeFuccio (R)

Bloomingdale (8,242), Ringwood (12,454) and Wanaque (1,994).

The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.

40th Kristin Corrado (R) Kevin J. Rooney (R)

Christopher DePhillips (R)

Little Falls (14,502), Pompton Lakes (11,206), Totowa (10,817), Wayne (55,072) and

Woodland Park (12,834). The remainder of this district includes portions of Bergen County,

Essex County & Morris County.

Highlands protection[]

In 2004, the New Jersey Legislature passed the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act, which regulates the New Jersey Highlands region. The northwestern area of the county, comprising the municipalities of Bloomingdale, Pompton Lakes, Ringwood, Wanaque and West Milford, was included in the highlands planning area and is subject to the rules of the act and the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Council, a division of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.[30] Some of the territory in the protected region is classified as being in the highlands preservation area, and thus subject to additional rules.[31]


Policing[]

The Passaic County sheriff's department provides law enforcement functions throughout entire Passaic County plus unincorporated county area police patrol, detective, crime scene investigation, SWAT, K-9 function, operation of the Passaic County Jail, and the security of all county-owned facilities, including the Passaic County Courthouse/Administration Complex. The incorporated cities within the county: Paterson, Passaic City, Clifton, Bloomingdale, Pompton Lakes, Prospect Park have separate municipal police departments.

Politics[]

As of August 1, 2020, there were a total of 318,029 registered voters in Passaic County, of which 128,114 (40.3%) were registered as Democrats, 64,389 (20.3%) were registered as Republicans and 120,282 (37.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5,244 (1.7%) voters registered to other parties.[32] Among the county's 2010 Census population, 53.2% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 70.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[33][34]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 58.8% of the vote here (113,257 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 37.7% (72,552 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (1,586 votes), among the 192,558 ballots cast by the county's 273,483 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.4%.[35] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 53.9% of the vote here (94,962 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 42.7% (75,200 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (1,149 votes), among the 176,303 ballots cast by the county's 254,569 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 69.3.[36]

United States presidential election results for Passaic County, New Jersey[37]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 92,009 41.02% 129,097 57.55% 3,224 1.44%
2016 72,902 37.15% 116,759 59.50% 6,567 3.35%
2012 64,523 35.41% 115,926 63.62% 1,765 0.97%
2008 72,552 38.65% 113,257 60.34% 1,904 1.01%
2004 75,200 43.90% 94,962 55.43% 1,149 0.67%
2000 61,043 38.99% 90,324 57.69% 5,206 3.32%
1996 53,594 35.04% 85,879 56.15% 13,478 8.81%
1992 71,147 43.15% 70,030 42.47% 23,711 14.38%
1988 88,070 55.91% 66,254 42.06% 3,189 2.02%
1984 101,951 58.28% 69,590 39.78% 3,399 1.94%
1980 82,531 51.92% 61,486 38.68% 14,934 9.40%
1976 85,102 51.20% 76,194 45.84% 4,930 2.97%
1972 108,511 62.03% 62,302 35.62% 4,110 2.35%
1968 79,862 46.25% 74,442 43.12% 18,353 10.63%
1964 63,114 35.12% 113,919 63.39% 2,666 1.48%
1960 80,853 45.07% 90,950 50.70% 7,599 4.24%
1956 101,182 60.71% 61,859 37.11% 3,635 2.18%
1952 89,083 54.26% 70,727 43.08% 4,380 2.67%
1948 59,675 45.75% 60,147 46.11% 10,608 8.13%
1944 67,856 49.46% 68,737 50.11% 589 0.43%
1940 65,523 48.21% 69,880 51.42% 504 0.37%
1936 49,046 40.14% 71,384 58.42% 1,760 1.44%
1932 49,218 44.99% 54,576 49.88% 5,610 5.13%
1928 57,708 54.53% 47,167 44.57% 959 0.91%
1924 43,384 62.33% 11,644 16.73% 14,571 20.94%
1920 42,692 72.08% 11,873 20.05% 4,660 7.87%
1916 18,754 55.32% 13,340 39.35% 1,810 5.34%
1912 5,349 17.52% 10,810 35.41% 14,372 47.07%
1908 17,638 55.97% 11,960 37.95% 1,918 6.09%
1904 17,705 56.41% 11,532 36.74% 2,150 6.85%
1900 15,619 52.97% 12,892 43.73% 973 3.30%
1896 15,437 58.81% 9,280 35.36% 1,530 5.83%



In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 50.8% of the vote here (57,010 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 43.2% (48,500 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 3.8% (4,288 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (981 votes), among the 112,278 ballots cast by the county's 262,723 registered voters, yielding a 42.7% turnout.[38]

Highlands protection[]

In 2004, the New Jersey Legislature passed the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act, which regulates the New Jersey Highlands region. The northwestern area of the county, comprising the municipalities of Bloomingdale, Pompton Lakes, Ringwood, Wanaque and West Milford, was included in the highlands planning area and is subject to the rules of the act and the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Council, a division of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.[39] Some of the territory in the protected region is classified as being in the highlands preservation area, and thus subject to additional rules.[40]


Municipalities[]

labeled outline map of municipalities

  • Bloomingdale (borough)
    • Macopin (community)
  • Clifton (city)
  • Haledon (borough)
  • Hawthorne (borough)
  • Little Falls (township)
  • North Haledon (borough)
  • Passaic (city)
  • Paterson (city)
  • Pompton Lakes (borough)
  • Prospect Park (borough)
  • Ringwood (borough)
  • Totowa (borough)
  • Wanaque (borough)
    • Haskell (community)
  • Wayne (township)
    • Packanack Lake (community)
    • Pines Lake (community)
    • Preakness (community)
  • West Milford (township)
    • Hewitt (community)
    • Newfoundland (community)
    • Oak Ridge (community)
  • Woodland Park (formerly West Paterson) (borough)

Transportation[]

New Jersey Transit's Main Line serves the eastern part of Passaic County. Numerous New Jersey Transit bus routes serve Passaic County as well.

The major highways that travel through Passaic County are Interstate 287, Interstate 80, US Route 202, US Route 46, Route 23, Route 21, Route 20, Route 19, Route 4, Route 3, and the Garden State Parkway.

Education[]

  • Passaic County Community College, founded in 1971, serves students from Passaic County at campuses in Paterson, Wanaque and Wayne.
  • William Paterson University, established in 1855, is a public university located in Wayne. As of Fall 2005, there are 9,110 undergraduate students and 1,860 graduate students enrolled in the university.
  • Montclair State University, founded in 1908, is a public university located in Montclair, Little Falls and Clifton. As of Fall 2004, there are about 9,600 full-time and 2,200 part-time undergraduate and 3,800 graduate students.

Media[]

Passaic County is served by New York City-based commercial television & radio stations and New Jersey Network public television.

Points of interest[]

  • Garret Mountain Reservation in Paterson and Woodland Park
  • Great Falls State Park in Paterson
  • Dey Mansion Washington's Headquarters, Preakness, Wayne Township
  • High Mountain Park Preserve in Wayne
  • Lambert Castle in Paterson
  • Paterson Museum, housed in the Rogers Locomotive and Machine Works in Paterson
  • Skylands, the New Jersey State Botanical Garden in Ringwood Borough
  • Yogi Berra Stadium in Little Falls
  • Ringwood Manor State Park in Ringwood
  • Long Pond Iron Works in West Milford, New Jersey

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Passaic County, New Jersey

References[]

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  2. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 209.
  3. ^ "New Jersey Resident Population by County: 1880 – 1930". http://www.wnjpin.net/OneStopCareerCenter/LaborMarketInformation/lmi01/poptrd5.htm. 
  4. ^ "Geostat Center: Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/. Retrieved 2007-03-02. 
  5. ^ "The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010". U.S. Census Bureau. 2011-02-03. http://2010.census.gov/news/xls/st34-final_newjersey.xls. Retrieved 2011-02-05. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ Passaic County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau
  8. ^ Passaic County Courthouse/Administration Complex , Emporis. Accessed July 9, 2015.
  9. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  10. ^ Gallo Jr., Bill. "Which N.J. county freeholders are paid the most?", NJ.com, March 11, 2016. Accessed October 25, 2017. "Freeholder director: $29,500; Other freeholders: $28,500"
  11. ^ Administration, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  12. ^ Meet Your Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  13. ^ 2019 County Data Sheet, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Passaic County 2019 Directory, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  15. ^ New Jersey State Constitution (1947), Article VII, Section II, Paragraph 2, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed October 26, 2017.
  16. ^ Passaic County Clerk, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  17. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  18. ^ "Official Results - 2018 General Election - Summary". Passaic County Clerk. http://www.passaiccountynj.org/Election%20Results/2018/Official%20Results%20-%202018%20General%20Election%20-Summary.pdf. 
  19. ^ Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik, Passaic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  20. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2017.
  21. ^ Our Surrogate, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  22. ^ Members List: Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2017.
  23. ^ Prosecutor Camelia M. Valdes, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  24. ^ "Governor Chris Christie Files Nominations", Governor of New Jersey Chris Christie, press release dated June 15, 2015. Accessed October 29, 2017. "PASSAIC COUNTY PROSECUTOR - Nominate for reappointment Camelia M. Valdes (Bloomingdale, Passaic))"
  25. ^ Passaic Vicinage, New Jersey Courts. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  26. ^ 2012 Congressional Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  27. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2011. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  28. ^ "Municipalities". https://www.passaiccountynj.org/about_us/municipalities/index.php. 
  29. ^ a b "New Jersey Legislature - Legislative Roster". https://www.njleg.state.nj.us/members/roster.asp. 
  30. ^ "Assembly Committee Substitute for Assembly, No. 2635" (PDF). New Jersey Legislature. 2004-06-07. pp. pp. 15-16. http://www.highlands.state.nj.us/njhighlands/actmaps/act/highlands_bill.pdf. Retrieved 2007-05-08. 
  31. ^ "Highlands Municipalities". NJDEP. August 23, 2005. http://www.nj.gov/dep/highlands/municipalities.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-08. 
  32. ^ "NJ Voter Registration by County". https://nj.gov/state/elections/assets/pdf/svrs-reports/2020/2020-08-voter-registration-by-county.pdf. 
  33. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Passaic, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  34. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  35. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  36. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  37. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  38. ^ 2009 Governor: Passaic County Script error: No such module "webarchive"., New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  39. ^ "Assembly Committee Substitute for Assembly, No. 2635" (PDF). New Jersey Legislature. 2004-06-07. pp. pp. 15-16. http://www.highlands.state.nj.us/njhighlands/actmaps/act/highlands_bill.pdf. Retrieved 2007-05-08. 
  40. ^ "Highlands Municipalities". NJDEP. August 23, 2005. http://www.nj.gov/dep/highlands/municipalities.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-08. 

External links[]

Commons-logo.png
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Coordinates: 41°02′N 74°18′W / 41.03, -74.30


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Passaic County, New Jersey. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Advertisement