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Pike County, Ohio
Pike County Courthouse in Waverly.jpg
Pike County Courthouse in Waverly.
Seal of Pike County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Pike County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded February 1, 1815[1]
Named for Zebulon Pike
Seat Waverly
Largest city Waverly
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

444 sq mi (1,150 km²)
440 sq mi (1,140 km²)
3.7 sq mi (10 km²), 0.8%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

27,088
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4

Pike County is a county located in the Appalachian (southern) region of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 27,088.[2] Its county seat is Waverly.[3] The county is named for explorer Zebulon Pike.[4]

History[]

Pike County was organized on February 1, 1815, from portions of Scioto, Ross, and Adams Counties, and was named in honor of Zebulon Pike, the explorer and soldier who had recently been killed in the War of 1812. Pike County was the site of the Pike County Massacre where eight members of the Rhoden family were shot and killed the evening of April 21–22, 2016.[5]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 444 square miles (1,150 km2), of which 440 square miles (1,100 km2) is land and 3.7 square miles (9.6 km2) (0.8%) is water.[6]

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 4,253
1830 6,024 41.6%
1840 7,626 26.6%
1850 10,953 43.6%
1860 13,643 24.6%
1870 15,447 13.2%
1880 17,927 16.1%
1890 17,482 −2.5%
1900 18,172 3.9%
1910 15,723 −13.5%
1920 14,151 −10.0%
1930 13,876 −1.9%
1940 16,113 16.1%
1950 14,607 −9.3%
1960 19,380 32.7%
1970 19,114 −1.4%
1980 22,802 19.3%
1990 24,249 6.3%
2000 27,695 14.2%
2010 28,709 3.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2020 [2]

2000 census[]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 27,695 people, 10,444 households, and 7,665 families living in the county. The population density was 63 people per square mile (24/km2). There were 11,602 housing units at an average density of 26 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.72% White, 0.89% Black or African American, 0.74% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.07% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. 0.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 10,444 households, out of which 35.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.80% were married couples living together, 11.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.60% were non-families. 22.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.20% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 21.50% from 45 to 64, and 13.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 95.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,649, and the median income for a family was $35,934. Males had a median income of $32,379 versus $20,761 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,093. About 15.10% of families and 18.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.20% of those under age 18 and 13.60% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 28,709 people, 11,012 households, and 7,743 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 65.2 inhabitants per square mile (25.2 /km2). There were 12,481 housing units at an average density of 28.3 per square mile (10.9 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 96.6% white, 0.9% black or African American, 0.5% American Indian, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.7% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 19.3% were German, 14.8% were Irish, 12.9% were English, and 12.5% were American.[14]

Of the 11,012 households, 34.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.7% were non-families, and 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.02. The median age was 39.2 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $35,912 and the median income for a family was $43,010. Males had a median income of $40,645 versus $27,422 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,494. About 18.0% of families and 23.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.7% of those under age 18 and 15.2% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Politics[]

Pike County used to be very strongly Democratic in presidential elections, being the only county in the state to vote for Adlai Stevenson in 1956. However, things have changed recently; Bill Clinton in 1996 was the last Democrat to win the county, though Barack Obama lost here by only one vote in 2012. In 2016 the county took a sharp turn to the right, as Republican Donald Trump won over 65% of the vote in the county, after Mitt Romney won it by only a single vote 4 years prior.

United States presidential election results for Pike County, Ohio[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 9,157 73.70% 3,110 25.03% 157 1.26%
2016 7,902 66.12% 3,539 29.61% 510 4.27%
2012 5,685 49.03% 5,684 49.02% 227 1.96%
2008 6,162 49.27% 6,033 48.24% 311 2.49%
2004 6,520 51.84% 5,989 47.62% 67 0.53%
2000 5,333 50.50% 4,923 46.62% 304 2.88%
1996 3,759 34.85% 5,542 51.38% 1,486 13.78%
1992 4,094 35.93% 5,057 44.39% 2,242 19.68%
1988 5,611 51.39% 5,191 47.54% 117 1.07%
1984 6,318 55.90% 4,895 43.31% 89 0.79%
1980 4,426 45.08% 4,938 50.30% 454 4.62%
1976 3,729 38.95% 5,734 59.89% 111 1.16%
1972 5,037 57.49% 3,531 40.30% 193 2.20%
1968 3,247 40.01% 3,445 42.45% 1,423 17.54%
1964 2,567 32.50% 5,331 67.50% 0 0.00%
1960 3,684 45.92% 4,339 54.08% 0 0.00%
1956 3,447 47.15% 3,863 52.85% 0 0.00%
1952 2,982 43.37% 3,893 56.63% 0 0.00%
1948 2,639 36.85% 4,516 63.06% 6 0.08%
1944 3,117 43.99% 3,968 56.01% 0 0.00%
1940 3,165 38.94% 4,962 61.06% 0 0.00%
1936 2,953 35.82% 5,287 64.13% 4 0.05%
1932 2,743 34.69% 5,107 64.58% 58 0.73%
1928 3,246 54.51% 2,709 45.49% 0 0.00%
1924 2,569 43.87% 3,185 54.39% 102 1.74%
1920 3,075 52.08% 2,799 47.41% 30 0.51%
1916 1,616 43.06% 2,091 55.72% 46 1.23%
1912 1,184 34.45% 1,691 49.20% 562 16.35%
1908 1,798 45.54% 2,085 52.81% 65 1.65%
1904 1,818 45.69% 2,090 52.53% 71 1.78%
1900 2,342 53.98% 1,960 45.17% 37 0.85%
1896 2,228 50.64% 2,145 48.75% 27 0.61%
1892 1,686 44.47% 1,926 50.80% 179 4.72%
1888 1,769 43.90% 2,162 53.65% 99 2.46%
1884 1,792 43.78% 2,238 54.68% 63 1.54%
1880 1,756 44.16% 2,192 55.13% 28 0.70%
1876 1,465 41.14% 2,096 58.86% 0 0.00%
1872 1,284 45.01% 1,568 54.96% 1 0.04%
1868 1,155 40.08% 1,727 59.92% 0 0.00%
1864 1,048 41.24% 1,493 58.76% 0 0.00%
1860 958 38.44% 1,397 56.06% 137 5.50%
1856 523 25.23% 1,175 56.68% 375 18.09%



Government[]

The Garnet A. Wilson Public Library serves area communities from its main branch in Waverly, Ohio and from its branches in Beaver, Piketon, and Western Pike County.

In 2005, the library loaned more than 238,000 items to its 20,000 cardholders. Total holding are over 91,000 volumes with over 210 periodical subscriptions.[17]

Pike County has adopted a county flag with an unusual shape, rounded at the fly end. It bears fourteen stars, representing the county's townships, and various industry symbols within a circular emblem, all upon a green field.[18] The flag is through and through except for the emblem.[19]

Communities[]

Map of Pike County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

City[]

  • Waverly (county seat)

Villages[]

  • Beaver
  • Piketon

Townships[]

  • Beaver
  • Benton
  • Camp Creek
  • Jackson
  • Marion
  • Mifflin
  • Newton
  • Pebble
  • Pee Pee
  • Perry
  • Scioto
  • Seal
  • Sunfish
  • Union

source:[20]

Census-designated places[]

  • Cynthiana
  • Stockdale

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Arkoe
  • Bethel
  • Buchanan
  • Byington
  • Camp
  • Daleyville
  • Elm Grove
  • Givens
  • Idaho
  • Jasper
  • Latham
  • Morgantown
  • New Fain
  • Omega
  • Poplar Grove
  • Sargents
  • Spellman Crossing
  • Wakefield
  • Zahns Corner

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Pike County, Ohio
  • Pike County, Ohio, shootings


References[]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Pike County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Pike.pdf. 
  2. ^ a b 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "Pike County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39131&sid=0. 
  5. ^ https://www.fox19.com/news/pike-county-massacre/
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39131. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39131. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39131. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39131. 
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  17. ^ "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. http://winslo.state.oh.us/publib/2005_stats_by_county.xls. 
  18. ^ "Pike". County Flags. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio Statehouse Museum. http://www.ohiostatehouse.org/museum/county-flags/pike. 
  19. ^ Stanley, Stephanie (November 9, 2015). "PCPADV hosts discussion about teen dating violence". The Pike County News Watchman. Waverly, Ohio. https://www.newswatchman.com/pike/article_61acd90e-08c2-5e47-b117-fb03e4f0d5ae.html. 
  20. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

External links[]

Coordinates: 39°05′N 83°04′W / 39.08, -83.07

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