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Placer County, California
Seal of Placer County, California
Seal
Map of California highlighting Placer County
Location in the state of California
Map of the U.S. highlighting California
California's location in the U.S.
Founded 1851
Seat Auburn
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

1,503 sq mi (3,893 km²)
1,404 sq mi (3,636 km²)
98 sq mi (254 km²), 6.55%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

404,739
218/sq mi (84/km²)
Website www.placer.ca.gov

Placer County is a county located in the Sierra Nevada of the U.S. state of California, in what is known as the Gold Country. It stretches from the suburbs of Sacramento to Lake Tahoe and the Nevada border. Because of the expansion of the Sacramento metropolitan area, Placer County is one of the fastest growing counties in the state. It is also considered one of the more politically and morally conservative counties and has less ethnic diversity than is found in other suburban regions of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 404,739. The county seat is Auburn.

History[]

Placer County was created from parts of Sutter and Yuba Counties in 1851.

"Placer" is probably a contraction of the words plaza de oro (the place of gold) and in Spanish means "a place near a river where gold is found." The county derived its name from the numerous places where the method of extracting gold from the earth, called placer mining, was practiced.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3892 km² (1503 sq mi). 3637 km² (1404 sq mi) of it is land and 255 km² (98 sq mi) of it (6.55%) is water. Watercourses in Placer County include the American River and Bunch Creek.

Incorporated Cities[]

Incorporated Towns[]

Unincorporated Places[]

Adjacent Counties[]

Transportation Infrastructure[]

Major Highways[]

Public Transportation[]

Airports[]

There are three general aviation airports in Placer County:

Demographics[]

As of the census² of 2000, there were 248,399 people, 93,382 households, and 67,701 families residing in the county. The population density was 68/km² (177/sq mi). There were 107,302 housing units at an average density of 30/km² (76/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 88.59% White, 0.82% Black or African American, 0.89% Native American, 2.95% Asian, 0.16% Pacific Islander, 3.39% from other races, and 3.21% from two or more races. 9.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 89.7% spoke English and 6.0% Spanish as their first language.

There were 93,382 households out of which 35.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.40% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.50% were non-families. 21.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.50% under the age of 18, 6.90% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 13.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 96.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $57,535, and the median income for a family was $65,858. Males had a median income of $50,410 versus $33,763 for females. The per capita income for the county was $27,963. About 3.90% of families and 5.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.30% of those under age 18 and 3.80% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[]

In its early history Placer County was solidly Republican: it voted Republican in every election between 1860 and 1912, when Bull Moose nominee Theodore Roosevelt was California's official Republican nominee.[1] Between 1916 and 1976, however, the county voted Republican only in three landslide elections of 1920, 1952 and 1972 – in all of which its GOP margins were much smaller than for the state or nation. Since the “Reagan Revolution” Placer County has become and remained a stronghold of the Republican Party; it consistently elects Republican public officials and has voted for presidential candidates from the party in every election since 1980.

United States presidential election results for Placer County, California[2]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 122,488 52.10% 106,869 45.46% 5,727 2.44%
2016 95,138 51.14% 73,509 39.52% 17,377 9.34%
2012 99,921 58.19% 66,818 38.91% 4,972 2.90%
2008 94,647 54.45% 75,112 43.21% 4,053 2.33%
2004 95,969 62.61% 55,573 36.26% 1,736 1.13%
2000 69,835 59.28% 42,449 36.04% 5,515 4.68%
1996 49,808 52.75% 34,981 37.05% 9,638 10.21%
1992 38,298 41.92% 30,783 33.69% 22,285 24.39%
1988 42,096 59.59% 27,516 38.95% 1,030 1.46%
1984 38,035 62.94% 21,294 35.24% 1,098 1.82%
1980 28,179 54.78% 17,311 33.65% 5,950 11.57%
1976 18,154 45.03% 21,026 52.16% 1,131 2.81%
1972 18,597 50.34% 16,911 45.77% 1,437 3.89%
1968 12,427 42.64% 14,050 48.21% 2,667 9.15%
1964 9,389 33.92% 18,256 65.96% 31 0.11%
1960 10,439 43.75% 13,304 55.75% 120 0.50%
1956 9,059 45.89% 10,611 53.76% 69 0.35%
1952 9,841 50.59% 9,444 48.55% 168 0.86%
1948 5,570 36.87% 8,837 58.49% 702 4.65%
1944 4,196 36.78% 7,149 62.66% 64 0.56%
1940 3,887 31.26% 8,402 67.56% 147 1.18%
1936 2,321 22.34% 7,959 76.62% 108 1.04%
1932 2,242 25.82% 6,200 71.40% 241 2.78%
1928 3,669 49.25% 3,685 49.46% 96 1.29%
1924 2,192 36.63% 390 6.52% 3,402 56.85%
1920 2,894 59.44% 1,559 32.02% 416 8.54%
1916 1,954 33.74% 3,375 58.28% 462 7.98%
1912 15 0.34% 1,823 41.84% 2,519 57.82%
1908 1,865 51.45% 1,491 41.13% 269 7.42%
1904 2,050 62.61% 1,023 31.25% 201 6.14%
1900 2,009 54.64% 1,592 43.30% 76 2.07%
1896 1,890 51.41% 1,721 46.82% 65 1.77%
1892 1,743 49.27% 1,524 43.08% 271 7.66%
1888 1,761 52.35% 1,547 45.99% 56 1.66%
1884 1,749 52.89% 1,483 44.84% 75 2.27%
1880 1,643 52.71% 1,416 45.43% 58 1.86%



In the United States House of Representatives, Placer County is split between California's 1st and 4th congressional districts,[3] represented by Doug LaMalfa (RRichvale) and Tom McClintock (RElk Grove), respectively.[4]

In the California State Senate, Placer County is split between the 1st and 4th districts,[5] represented by Ted Gaines and Jim Nielsen, respectively.

In the California State Assembly, the county is split between the 1st, 5th, and 6th districts,[6] represented by Brian Dahle, Frank Bigelow, and Beth Gaines, respectively.

References[]

See also[]

External links[]

Coordinates: 39°04′N 120°44′W / 39.06, -120.73

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Placer County, California. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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