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Robertson County, Tennessee
Springfield, TN Courthouse 2019.jpg
Robertson County courthouse in Springfield
Seal of Robertson County, Tennessee
Seal
Map of Tennessee highlighting Robertson County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the U.S. highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Founded April 9, 1796
Named for James Robertson[1]
Seat Springfield
Largest city Springfield
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

476 sq mi (1,233 km²)
476 sq mi (1,233 km²)
0.2 sq mi (1 km²), 0.04%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

72,803 increase
145/sq mi (56/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.robertsoncountytn.gov

Robertson County is a county located on the central northern border of Tennessee in the United States. As of the 2020 United States Census, the population was 72,803 people. Its county seat is Springfield.[2] The county was named for James Robertson, an explorer, founder of Nashville, and a state senator, who was often called the "Father of Middle Tennessee". Robertson County is a component of the Nashville-DavidsonMurfreesboroFranklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area. In 2002 Howard Bradley became the mayor of Robertson County. Bradley was re-elected and served as Mayor until 2018, when he was succeeded by Billy Vogle, the current incumbent.[3]

History[]

This was part of the Miro District (also spelled Mero), named after the Spanish Governor Esteban Rodríguez Miró of what was then Louisiana on the west side of the Mississippi River. Miró had served with Spanish troops that assisted the Americans during their war for independence. James Robertson, the explorer for whom this county was named, was trying to create an alliance with Miró that would allow free movement on the Mississippi River (which Spain controlled) to settlers on the Cumberland frontier. Before statehood, this territory was known as Tennessee County.

It was organized as Robertson County in 1796, at the same time as Montgomery County, which had also been part of the Miro district. The county seat, Springfield, Tennessee, was laid out in 1798. Although initially most settlers did not hold slaves, by the 1820s planters began to cultivate tobacco, a commodity crop that was labor-intensive and depended on enslaved African Americans. The planters bought slaves to work their plantations, as well as to care for the livestock they bred - thoroughbred horses and cattle.

By the time of the Civil War, African Americans comprised about one-quarter of the area's population, typical for Middle Tennessee, where tobacco and hemp were commodity crops. During the Civil War, Tennessee was occupied by the Union from 1862, which led to a breakdown in social organization in Middle Tennessee.[4]

By 1910 the county's population was 25,466, including 6,492 black citizens, who continued to make up one-quarter of the total. Most of the residents were still involved in farm work, and tobacco was the primary commodity crop, but agricultural mechanization was reducing the need for laborers. White conservative Democrats had tried to restrict black voting; other southern states had totally excluded blacks from the political process. Many African Americans left rural Robertson County and other parts of Tennessee in the Great Migration to northern and midwestern cities for employment and social freedom. Combined with later in-migration of whites to the county, by the early 21st century, African Americans comprised less than 10 percent of the county population. They live chiefly in its larger towns.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 476 square miles (1,230 km2), of which 476 square miles (1,230 km2) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) (0.04%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[]

State protected areas[]

  • Cedar Hill Swamp Wildlife Management Area
  • Port Royal State Park (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1800 4,280
1810 7,270 69.9%
1820 9,938 36.7%
1830 13,372 34.6%
1840 13,801 3.2%
1850 16,145 17.0%
1860 15,265 −5.5%
1870 16,166 5.9%
1880 18,861 16.7%
1890 20,078 6.5%
1900 25,029 24.7%
1910 25,466 1.7%
1920 25,621 0.6%
1930 28,191 10.0%
1940 29,046 3.0%
1950 27,024 −7.0%
1960 27,335 1.2%
1970 29,102 6.5%
1980 37,021 27.2%
1990 41,494 12.1%
2000 54,433 31.2%
2010 66,238 21.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2020[10]

2020 census[]

Robertson County racial composition[11]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 57,049 78.36%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 5,091 6.99%
Native American 139 0.19%
Asian 447 0.61%
Pacific Islander 21 0.03%
Other/Mixed 3,178 4.37%
Hispanic or Latino 6,878 9.45%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 72,803 people, 26,577 households, and 20,378 families residing in the county.

2000 census[]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 54,433 people, 19,906 households, and 15,447 families residing in the county. The population density was 114 people per square mile (44/km2). There were 20,995 housing units at an average density of 44 per square mile (17/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 89.13% White, 8.62% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.83% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 2.66% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

In 2005 the racial makeup of the county was 85.4% non-Hispanic whites, 8.3% African Americans, and 5.3% Latinos.

There were 19,906 households, out of which 37.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.90% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.40% were non-families. 18.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.80% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 31.40% from 25 to 44, 22.50% from 45 to 64, and 10.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $43,174, and the median income for a family was $49,412. Males had a median income of $34,895 versus $24,086 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,054. About 6.40% of families and 9.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.90% of those under age 18 and 13.10% of those age 65 or over.


Communities[]

Cities[]

Towns[]

  • Coopertown

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Ashburn
  • Baggettsville
  • Barren Plains
  • Crunk
  • Holmansville
  • Hubertville
  • Milldale
  • Port Royal (partial Montgomery County)
  • Sandy Springs
  • Stroudville
  • Turnersville
  • Youngville

Transportation[]

Interstate 65 runs along the eastern border of the county for about 20 miles (32 km), and Interstate 24 runs along the southwestern border of the county for about 10 miles (16 km). U.S. Routes 41 and 431 run through the county, intersecting and briefly forming a concurrency in Springfield. Major state routes include 25, 49, 52, 76, and 109. Secondary state routes in Robertson County include 161, 256, and 257.[13]

Politics[]

United States presidential election results for Robertson County, Tennessee[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 24,536 72.77% 8,692 25.78% 489 1.45%
2016 19,410 71.59% 6,637 24.48% 1,066 3.93%
2012 17,643 67.11% 8,290 31.53% 356 1.35%
2008 17,903 64.83% 9,318 33.74% 393 1.42%
2004 15,331 60.54% 9,865 38.96% 127 0.50%
2000 9,675 47.98% 10,249 50.83% 240 1.19%
1996 6,685 41.19% 8,465 52.16% 1,079 6.65%
1992 5,271 33.41% 8,498 53.86% 2,010 12.74%
1988 5,714 48.95% 5,884 50.41% 74 0.63%
1984 5,445 48.34% 5,756 51.11% 62 0.55%
1980 3,560 32.00% 7,381 66.34% 185 1.66%
1976 2,505 24.77% 7,547 74.62% 62 0.61%
1972 4,175 56.43% 2,985 40.34% 239 3.23%
1968 1,802 22.47% 2,315 28.86% 3,904 48.67%
1964 1,797 23.70% 5,784 76.30% 0 0.00%
1960 1,776 30.15% 4,053 68.80% 62 1.05%
1956 1,517 23.25% 4,961 76.02% 48 0.74%
1952 1,834 26.59% 5,063 73.41% 0 0.00%
1948 376 9.53% 3,044 77.14% 526 13.33%
1944 622 16.77% 3,074 82.90% 12 0.32%
1940 490 13.01% 3,258 86.49% 19 0.50%
1936 388 12.70% 2,629 86.03% 39 1.28%
1932 252 8.31% 2,752 90.71% 30 0.99%
1928 848 35.30% 1,543 64.24% 11 0.46%
1924 229 11.94% 1,645 85.77% 44 2.29%
1920 1,191 28.04% 3,046 71.70% 11 0.26%
1916 733 25.08% 2,106 72.05% 84 2.87%
1912 513 16.73% 2,287 74.57% 267 8.71%
1908 755 23.68% 2,418 75.85% 15 0.47%
1904 811 25.46% 2,308 72.44% 67 2.10%
1900 1,128 29.96% 2,564 68.10% 73 1.94%
1896 1,386 30.62% 2,943 65.02% 197 4.35%
1892 879 24.06% 1,938 53.04% 837 22.91%
1888 952 27.31% 2,203 63.20% 331 9.50%
1884 794 28.52% 1,977 71.01% 13 0.47%
1880 951 30.49% 2,107 67.55% 61 1.96%



See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Robertson County, Tennessee

References[]

  1. ^ Yolanda Reid, "Robertson County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: March 21, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ County Mayor, Robertson County
  4. ^ Durham, Walter T. Rebellion Revisited: A History of Sumner County, Tennessee from 1861 to 1870(Franklin, Tennessee: Hillsboro Press, 1999, 2nd ed.)
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_47.txt. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/tn190090.txt. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  10. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/47/47147.html. 
  11. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US47147&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  13. ^ Tennessee Department of Transportation (2018). Robertson County (Map). https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/tdot/maps/county-maps-(us-shields)/o-w/Robertson_County.pdf. 
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

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Coordinates: 36°32′N 86°52′W / 36.53, -86.87

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Robertson County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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