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Sacramento County, California
—  County  —
County of Sacramento
[[File:
California State Capitol front 1999.jpgFolsom Powerhouse Close.JPG
Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge 2.jpgISH WC SuttersFort4.jpg
Images, from top down, left to right: California State Capitol, Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sutter's Fort
|250px|none|alt=|Skyline of Sacramento County, California]]

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[[File:Script error: No such module "Mapframe".|250px|none|alt=|Interactive map of Sacramento County]]Interactive map of Sacramento County
Location in the state of California
Country United States
State California
Region Sacramento Valley
Metro area Greater Sacramento
Incorporated February 18, 1850[1]
Named for The capital city of Sacramento, which is named for the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist
County seat (and largest city) Sacramento
Government
 • Type Council–manager
 • Body Board of Supervisors
 • Board of Supervisors
 • County Executive Navdeep S. Gill
Area
 • Total 994 sq mi (2,570 km2)
 • Land 965 sq mi (2,500 km2)
 • Water 29 sq mi (80 km2)
Highest elevation[2] 831 ft (253 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)[3]
 • Total 1,418,788
 • Estimate (2019)[4] 1,552,058
 • Density 1,400/sq mi (550/km2)
Time zone Pacific Standard Time (UTC−8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific Daylight Time (UTC−7)
FIPS code 06-067
Website saccounty.net

Sacramento County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,418,788.[3] Its county seat is Sacramento,[5] which has been the state capital of California since 1854.

Sacramento County is the central county of the Greater Sacramento metropolitan area. The county covers about 994 square miles (2,570 km2) in the northern portion of the Central Valley, on into Gold Country. Sacramento County extends from the low delta lands between the Sacramento River and San Joaquin River, including Suisun Bay, north to about ten miles (16 km) beyond the State Capitol and east into the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The southernmost portion of Sacramento County has direct access to San Francisco Bay.

History[]

Gabriel Moraga named the Sacramento River in 1808. The name was later expanded to the City of Sacramento and the county.

Sacramento County was one of the original counties of California, which were created in 1850 at the time of statehood.

The county was named after the Sacramento River, which forms its western border. The river was named by Spanish cavalry officer Gabriel Moraga for the Santisimo Sacramento (Most Holy Sacrament), referring to the Catholic Eucharist.

Alexander Hamilton Willard, a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, is buried in the old Franklin Cemetery.

Geography[]

Sacramento

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 994 square miles (2,570 km2), of which 965 square miles (2,500 km2) is land and 29 square miles (75 km2) (3.0%) is water.[6] Most of the county is at an elevation close to sea level, with some areas below sea level. The highest point in the county is Carpenter Hill at 828 feet (252 m), in the southeast part of Folsom. Major watercourses in the county include the American River, Sacramento River, Cosumnes River, a tributary of the Mokelumne River, and Dry Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento River.

Adjacent counties[]

National protected areas[]

  • Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge
  • California National Historic Trail
  • Pony Express National Historic Trail

Demographics[]

2011[]

Places by population, ethnicity, and income[]

2010[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 9,087
1860 24,142 165.7%
1870 26,830 11.1%
1880 34,390 28.2%
1890 40,339 17.3%
1900 45,915 13.8%
1910 67,806 47.7%
1920 91,029 34.2%
1930 141,999 56.0%
1940 170,333 20.0%
1950 277,140 62.7%
1960 502,778 81.4%
1970 631,498 25.6%
1980 783,381 24.1%
1990 1,041,219 32.9%
2000 1,223,499 17.5%
2010 1,418,788 16.0%
Est. 2019 1,552,058 [4] 26.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1790–1960[16] 1900–1990[17]
1990–2000[18] 2010–2015[3]

The 2010 United States Census reported that Sacramento County had a population of 1,418,788. The racial makeup of Sacramento County was 815,151 (57.5%) White, 200,228 (15.4%) African American, 14,308 (1.0%) Native American, 203,211 (14.3%) Asian, 13,858 (1.0%) Pacific Islander, 131,691 (9.3%) from other races, and 93,511 (6.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 306,196 persons (21.6%).[19]

2000[]

As of the census[20] of 2000, there were 1,223,499 people, 453,602 households, and 297,562 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,267 people per square mile (489/km2). There were 474,814 housing units at an average density of 492/sq mi (190/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 64.0% White, 10.6% Black or African American, 1.09% Native American, 13.5% Asian, 0.6% Pacific Islander, 7.5% from other races, and 5.8% from two or more races. 19.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 10.2% were of German, 7.0% English, 6.7% Irish and 5.1% American ancestry according to Census 2000. 75.7% spoke only English at home; 10.0% spoke Spanish, 1.5% Hmong, 1.4% Chinese or Mandarin, 1.3% Vietnamese, 1.2% Tagalog and 1.2% Russian.

There were 453,602 households, out of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.4% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.4% were non-families. 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.6% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $43,816, and the median income for a family was $50,717. Males had a median income of $39,482 versus $31,569 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,142. About 10.3% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.2% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Government and policing[]

Government[]

The Government of Sacramento County is defined and authorized under the California Constitution, California law, and the Charter of the County of Sacramento.[21] Much of the Government of California is in practice the responsibility of county governments such as the Government of Sacramento County, while municipalities such as the city of Sacramento and Folsom provide additional, often non-essential services.

It is composed of the elected five-member Board of Supervisors, several other elected offices including the Sheriff, District Attorney, and Assessor, and numerous county departments and entities under the supervision of the County Executive Officer. In addition, several entities of the government of California have jurisdiction conterminous with Sacramento County, such as the Sacramento County Superior Court.

Under its foundational Charter, the five-member elected Sacramento County Board of Supervisors (BOS) is the county legislature. The board operates in a legislative, executive, and quasi-judicial capacity. The current members are:

  • Phil Serna, district 1
  • Patrick Kennedy, district 2
  • Rich Desmond, district 3
  • Sue Frost, district 4
  • Don Nottoli, district 5

The Sacramento County Code is the codified law of Sacramento County in the form of local ordinances passed by the Board of Supervisors.

Policing[]

The Sacramento County Sheriff provides court protection and jail management for the entire county. It provides patrol and detective services for the unincorporated areas of the county. Incorporated municipalities within the county that have their own municipal police departments or contract with the Sacramento County sheriff for their policing are: Elk Grove, 170,000, municipal department; Citrus Heights, 88,000, municipal department; Folsom, 78,000, municipal department; Isleton, sheriff contract; Rancho Cordova, 73,000, sheriff contract; Galt, population 26,000, municipal department.

Politics[]

Voter registration[]

Cities by population and voter registration[]

Overview[]

Sacramento County was politically competitive in most presidential elections between 1952 and 2004, but now votes significantly in favor of the Democratic candidates. Candidates from the Democratic Party have carried the county in the past seven presidential elections, and have won a majority of the county's votes thrice during that time (in 2008, 2012 and 2016). The city of Sacramento is strongly Democratic, while rural areas are strongly Republican; suburban areas are more divided. This pattern is also present in congressional and state legislative elections. The last Republican presidential candidate to win a majority in the county was George H.W. Bush in 1988.

United States presidential election results for Sacramento County, California[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 259,405 36.11% 440,808 61.36% 18,227 2.54%
2016 189,789 33.75% 326,023 57.98% 46,473 8.27%
2012 202,514 39.13% 300,503 58.06% 14,565 2.81%
2008 213,583 39.34% 316,506 58.30% 12,770 2.35%
2004 235,539 49.29% 236,657 49.52% 5,670 1.19%
2000 195,619 45.33% 212,792 49.31% 23,139 5.36%
1996 166,049 40.76% 203,019 49.83% 38,346 9.41%
1992 160,366 35.36% 197,540 43.56% 95,606 21.08%
1988 201,832 51.01% 188,557 47.65% 5,301 1.34%
1984 204,922 55.56% 159,128 43.14% 4,791 1.30%
1980 153,721 47.72% 130,031 40.37% 38,368 11.91%
1976 123,110 44.63% 144,203 52.27% 8,563 3.10%
1972 141,218 49.00% 137,287 47.63% 9,716 3.37%
1968 97,177 41.66% 118,769 50.92% 17,300 7.42%
1964 77,871 34.17% 149,668 65.68% 332 0.15%
1960 84,252 43.26% 109,695 56.32% 809 0.42%
1956 67,686 45.10% 82,134 54.73% 260 0.17%
1952 67,207 49.02% 69,066 50.37% 837 0.61%
1948 35,074 37.78% 54,197 58.38% 3,571 3.85%
1944 24,611 33.16% 49,204 66.30% 403 0.54%
1940 23,201 30.76% 51,351 68.09% 864 1.15%
1936 12,119 20.14% 47,265 78.53% 800 1.33%
1932 14,553 27.74% 36,370 69.32% 1,542 2.94%
1928 20,762 50.83% 19,684 48.19% 403 0.99%
1924 13,400 41.08% 2,285 7.01% 16,932 51.91%
1920 15,634 64.87% 7,150 29.67% 1,316 5.46%
1916 10,696 40.19% 14,538 54.63% 1,379 5.18%
1912 36 0.19% 9,869 51.39% 9,300 48.42%
1908 6,515 55.15% 4,533 38.37% 766 6.48%
1904 6,666 65.23% 2,384 23.33% 1,170 11.45%
1900 5,506 54.78% 4,325 43.03% 220 2.19%
1896 4,600 47.68% 4,831 50.07% 217 2.25%
1892 4,362 48.92% 3,498 39.23% 1,057 11.85%
1888 4,769 56.37% 3,447 40.74% 244 2.88%
1884 4,367 60.15% 2,659 36.63% 234 3.22%
1880 3,794 56.11% 2,817 41.66% 151 2.23%



In gubernatorial elections, Sacramento County is typically a bellwether, having voted for the winner every time since 1962 with the exception of 1970 and 2002.

In the House of Representatives, all of California's 7th congressional district and portions of its 3rd, 6th, and 9th districts are in the county.[24]

In the State Assembly, all of the 7th and 8th districts and parts of the 6th, 9th, and 11th districts are in the county.

In the State Senate, parts of the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 8th districts are in the county.

According to the California Secretary of State, as of October 22, 2012, Sacramento County has 698,899 registered voters, out of 944,243 eligible (74%). Of those, 306,960 (44%) are registered Democrats, 225,688 (32%) are registered Republicans, and 134,677 (19%) have declined to state a political party.[25]

Crime[]

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates[]

Education[]

Colleges and universities[]

Public schools[]

  • California State University Sacramento
  • UC Davis Extension
    • UC Davis School of Medicine
    • UC Davis Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

Community colleges[]

  • Los Rios Community College District
    • American River College
    • Cosumnes River College
    • Folsom Lake College
    • Sacramento City College
  • Sierra College

Private, not for profit[]

  • University of the Pacific in Sacramento
  • National University Sacramento Regional Campus
  • University of San Francisco Regional Campus
  • University of Southern California Extension
  • Western Seminary
  • Epic Bible College

Private, for profit[]

  • Alliant International University
  • California Northstate University College of Pharmacy
  • DeVry University
  • Lincoln Law School of Sacramento
  • MTI College
  • Professional School of Psychology
  • San Joaquin Valley College
  • The Art Institute of California – Sacramento, a branch of The Art Institute of California - Los Angeles
  • Universal Technical Institute
  • University of Phoenix Sacramento Valley

Transportation[]

Pocket-Greenhaven

Public Transportation[]

Sacramento Regional Transit District, also known as Sacramento RT, provides public transit throughout the county. It operates bus services, as well as light rail services on the Blue, Green, and Gold lines. In addition, the Yolobus provides Sacramento County with service connecting to destinations in neighboring Yolo County, such as Davis. Sacramento RT and Yolobus both provide bus services connecting Sacramento with Sacramento International Airport.

Amtrak and its Amtrak California subsidiary operate passenger rail service from the Sacramento Valley station. This station is served by the Coast Starlight, the California Zephyr, the Capitol Corridor, and the San Joaquins, which link the region with destinations across California and the United States.

Major highways[]

  • I-5
  • I-80
  • I-80 Bus.
  • US 50
  • [[Template:Infobox road/CA/link CA|Template:Infobox road/CA/abbrev CA]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/CA/link CA|Template:Infobox road/CA/abbrev CA]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/CA/link CA|Template:Infobox road/CA/abbrev CA]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/CA/link CA|Template:Infobox road/CA/abbrev CA]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/CA/link CA|Template:Infobox road/CA/abbrev CA]]

Airports[]

Sacramento International Airport is a major, full-service airport with passenger flights. It is owned by the County of Sacramento. The county also owns Sacramento Mather Airport in Rancho Cordova and Sacramento Executive Airport, both of which are general aviation airports. Sacramento McClellan Airport, formerly McClellan Air Force Base, is a privately owned airport between North Highlands and Rio Linda. There are also privately owned public use airports located in Elk Grove and Rio Linda.

Public roadways[]

The Sacramento County Department of Transportation (SACDOT)[29] maintains approximately 2200 miles of roadway within the unincorporated area. The roads range from six lane thoroughfares to rural roads.[30]

Communities[]

Elk Grove

Folsom Lake

Cities[]

Census-designated places[]

  • Antelope
  • Arden-Arcade
  • Carmichael
  • Clay
  • Courtland
  • Elverta
  • Fair Oaks
  • Florin
  • Foothill Farms
  • Franklin
  • Freeport
  • Fruitridge Pocket
  • Gold River
  • Herald
  • Hood
  • La Riviera
  • Lemon Hill
  • Mather
  • McClellan Park
  • North Highlands
  • Orangevale
  • Parkway
  • Rancho Murieta
  • Rio Linda
  • Rosemont
  • Vineyard
  • Walnut Grove
  • Wilton

Unincorporated community[]

  • Locke

Former townships[]

1885 map showing the boundaries of the county's 14 civil townships

In February 1851, the county was divided into eight civil townships: the seven marked by asterisks below, plus Sacramento township. In July of that year, American township was divided off from Sacramento township. In 1856, the Board of Supervisors realigned the divisions into the 14 civil townships below, plus the city of Sacramento.[31]

  • Alabama
  • American
  • Brighton*
  • Center*
  • Cosumnes*
  • Dry Creek
  • Franklin
  • Georgiana
  • Granite
  • Lee
  • Mississippi*
  • Natoma*
  • San Joaquin*
  • Sutter*

Population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of Sacramento County.[32]

county seat

Rank City/town/etc. Municipal type Population (2020 Census)
1 Sacramento (State Capital) City 524,943
2 Elk Grove City 176,124
3 Arden-Arcade CDP 94,659
4 Citrus Heights City 87,583
5 Folsom City 80,454
6 Carmichael CDP 79,793
7 Rancho Cordova City 79,332
8 Florin CDP 52,388
9 North Highlands CDP 49,327
10 Antelope CDP 48,733
11 Vineyard CDP 43,935
12 Foothill Farms CDP 35,834
13 Orangevale CDP 35,569
14 Fair Oaks CDP 32,514
15 Galt City 25,383
16 Rosemont CDP 23,510
17 Parkway CDP 15,962
18 Rio Linda CDP 15,944
19 Lemon Hill CDP 14,496
20 La Riviera CDP 11,252
21 Gold River CDP 7,844
22 Fruitridge Pocket CDP 6,102
23 Wilton CDP 5,958
24 Rancho Murieta CDP 5,903
25 Elverta CDP 5,435
26 Mather CDP 4,698
27 Walnut Grove CDP 1,452
28 Clay CDP 1,252
29 Herald CDP 1,160
30 McClellan Park CDP 926
31 Isleton City 794
32 Courtland CDP 326
33 Hood CDP 244
34 Franklin CDP 167
35 Freeport CDP 58

See also[]

  • Hiking trails in Sacramento County
  • History of Sacramento, California
  • List of California Historical Landmarks in Sacramento County
  • List of school districts in Sacramento County, California
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Sacramento County, California
  • Sacramento Metropolitan Cable Television Commission

Notes[]

  1. ^ Other = some other race / two or more races
  2. ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  3. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

References[]

  1. ^ "Chronology". California State Association of Counties. http://www.counties.org/general-information/chronology. 
  2. ^ Carpenter Hill
  3. ^ a b c "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06067.html. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=PEP_2018_PEPANNRES&prodType=table. 
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_06.txt. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  8. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  9. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  10. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  11. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  12. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  13. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  14. ^ a b c d Data unavailable
  15. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  17. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ca190090.txt. 
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  19. ^ "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau. http://www2.census.gov/census_2010/01-Redistricting_File--PL_94-171/California/. 
  20. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  21. ^ California Government Code § 23004
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration Script error: No such module "webarchive".. Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/. 
  24. ^ "California's 7th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/CA/7. 
  25. ^ CA Secretary of State – Report of Registration – October 22, 2012 Script error: No such module "webarchive".
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009 Script error: No such module "webarchive".. Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  27. ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  28. ^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  29. ^ Sacramento County Department of Transportation (SACDOT)
  30. ^ http://www.sacdot.com/Pages/MileageofMaintainedRoadways.aspx
  31. ^ Davis, Winfield J. (1890). An Illustrated History of Sacramento County, California. Lewis Pub. Co.. pp. 208–209. OCLC 181326892. https://archive.org/details/illustratedhisto00davi. 
  32. ^ "Explore Census Data". United States Census Bureau. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/. 

External links[]

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Coordinates: 38°27′N 121°21′W / 38.45, -121.35

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