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Scotland County, North Carolina
Map of North Carolina highlighting Scotland County
Location in the state of North Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location in the U.S.
Founded 1899
Seat Laurinburg
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

321 sq mi (831 km²)
319 sq mi (826 km²)
2 sq mi (5 km²), 0.47%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

34,174
114/sq mi (44/km²)
Website www.scotlandcounty.org

Scotland County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of 2020, the population was 34,174. Its county seat is Laurinburg[1].

History[]

The county was formed in 1899 from the southeastern part of Richmond County. It was named after Scotland, as many of its early European settlers were Scots-Irish and Scottish Highlanders.

Law and government[]

Scotland County is a member of the regional Lumber River Council of Governments.

As of the redistricting by the North Carolina General Assembly in 2016, Scotland County is located entirely in North Carolina's 9th congressional district. It is represented in the 116th United States Congress by Dan Bishop (R).

The county has only voted for 3 Republican candidates since 1900: Richard Nixon in 1972, Ronald Reagan in 1984, and Donald Trump in 2020. It was the only county in North Carolina to flip from Democratic to Republican between 2016 and 2020.

United States presidential election results for Scotland County, North Carolina[2]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 7,473 50.58% 7,186 48.64% 116 0.79%
2016 6,256 44.92% 7,319 52.55% 353 2.53%
2012 5,831 41.19% 8,215 58.03% 110 0.78%
2008 6,005 42.24% 8,151 57.33% 61 0.43%
2004 5,141 44.52% 6,386 55.30% 20 0.17%
2000 3,740 39.77% 5,627 59.84% 36 0.38%
1996 2,858 34.44% 4,870 58.68% 571 6.88%
1992 2,980 31.84% 5,175 55.29% 1,205 12.87%
1988 3,199 45.16% 3,865 54.56% 20 0.28%
1984 4,077 50.23% 4,028 49.62% 12 0.15%
1980 2,133 31.45% 4,446 65.56% 203 2.99%
1976 1,932 30.26% 4,430 69.39% 22 0.34%
1972 3,485 63.69% 1,938 35.42% 49 0.90%
1968 1,717 28.69% 2,252 37.63% 2,016 33.68%
1964 1,229 24.23% 3,844 75.77% 0 0.00%
1960 1,279 25.99% 3,643 74.01% 0 0.00%
1956 1,171 27.79% 3,042 72.21% 0 0.00%
1952 1,590 35.32% 2,912 64.68% 0 0.00%
1948 359 12.74% 1,957 69.42% 503 17.84%
1944 303 11.33% 2,372 88.67% 0 0.00%
1940 250 7.74% 2,981 92.26% 0 0.00%
1936 314 8.98% 3,183 91.02% 0 0.00%
1932 208 7.37% 2,608 92.42% 6 0.21%
1928 588 25.03% 1,761 74.97% 0 0.00%
1924 205 12.17% 1,469 87.18% 11 0.65%
1920 306 15.22% 1,705 84.78% 0 0.00%
1916 137 12.74% 938 87.26% 0 0.00%
1912 9 1.08% 751 89.94% 75 8.98%
1908 85 10.64% 714 89.36% 0 0.00%
1904 65 9.14% 646 90.86% 0 0.00%
1900 44 4.53% 925 95.26% 2 0.21%



Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 321 square miles (830 km²), of which, 319 square miles (827 km²) of it is land and 2 square miles (4 km²) of it (0.47%) is water.

Townships[]

The county is divided into four townships: Laurel Hill, Spring Hill, Stewartsville, and Davidson

Adjacent Counties[]

Demographics[]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 35,998 people, 13,399 households, and 9,674 families residing in the county. The population density was 113 people per square mile (44/km²). There were 14,693 housing units at an average density of 46 per square mile (18/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 51.49% White, 37.32% Black or African American, 8.88% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.33% from two or more races. 1.18% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

In 2005 49.4% of Scotland County's population was non-Hispanic whites.

In 2000 there were 13,399 households out of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.10% were married couples living together, 20.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.80% were non-families. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the county the population was spread out with 28.10% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 11.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 88.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,010, and the median income for a family was $39,178. Males had a median income of $31,212 versus $23,172 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,693. About 17.40% of families and 20.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.80% of those under age 18 and 17.20% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[]

Map of Scotland County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

  • East Laurinburg
  • Gibson
  • Laurel Hill
  • Laurinburg
  • Wagram

Travel & Tourism[]

While Scotland County is the smallest county in the state of North Carolina (100 out of 100), it ranks 63rd in generating tourism dollars. The North Carolina Department of Commerce, estimates the county brings in approximately $33 million in travel and tourism dollars each year. [4]

Primary tourism draws include:[5]

  • Festivals (Scotland County Highland Games, Storytelling Festival of Carolinas, John Blue Festival)
  • Historical sites (John Blue House (Laurinburg, North Carolina), Old Laurel Hill Church)
  • Museums and heritage (Scotland County Museum, Indian Museum, Scottish Heritage Center)
  • The outdoors (Cypress Bend Vineyards, St. Andrews Equestrian Center, Chalk Banks, Lumber River), and
  • The local college: St. Andrews Presbyterian College.

The county is often referred to as the “Soul of the Carolinas” – as it maintains its historical and personal touch in one of the fastest growing states [6]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Scotland County, North Carolina

References[]

External links[]

Coordinates: 34°50′N 79°29′W / 34.84, -79.48


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Scotland County, North Carolina. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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