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Stark County, Ohio
Stark County Courthouse (Canton, OH) edit.JPG
Stark County Courthouse
Seal of Stark County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Stark County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded January 1, 1809
Named for John Stark
Seat Canton
Largest city Canton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

581 sq mi (1,505 km²)
575 sq mi (1,489 km²)
5.3 sq mi (14 km²), 0.9%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

374,853
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional districts 7th, 13th, 16th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.starkcountyohio.gov/

Stark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 374,853.[1] Its county seat is Canton.[2] The county was created in 1808 and organized the next year.[3] It is named for John Stark, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.[4]

Stark County is included in the Canton-Massillon, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Cleveland-Akron-Canton, OH Combined Statistical Area.

History

Stark County was named in honor of American Revolutionary War General John Stark. John Stark (August 28, 1728 – May 8, 1822) was a general who served in the American Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He became widely known as the "Hero of Bennington" for his exemplary service at the Battle of Bennington in 1777.

In the 1760s Moravian missionaries from Pennsylvania attempted to establish missions aimed at converting the native people. The earliest of these were Christian Frederick Post and John Heckewelder.

The first permanent settlements were established in 1805, beginning with Canton. Possibly 80% of the early settlers were German-speakers from Pennsylvania, although others came from Virginia, New York, and New England. Lumbering and sawmills were important early industries, to cater to the enormous demand for lumber from the incoming settlers. Stark County was originally part of Columbiana County, but was split off in 1807.

At the start of the Civil War the men of Stark County were quick to volunteer to preserve the Union. As of 1862 over 1,100 had enlisted.[5]

During the early 20th century, Stark County was an important location in the early development of professional football. The rivalry between the Massillon Tigers and Canton Bulldogs helped bring the Ohio League to prominence in the mid-1900s (decade) and again in the late 1910s. The Bulldogs ended up a charter member of the National Football League, where it played for several years. (The role Stark County had in developing the game is part of the reason the Pro Football Hall of Fame is located in Canton.) Two relatively large football stadiums, Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton and Paul Brown Tiger Stadium in Massillon, are still in use (albeit now mostly for high school football), with Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium hosting the NFL's annual Pro Football Hall of Fame Game each year.

In the later 20th century, Stark County's voting record swung from one party to another, closely tracking the winner of the U.S. Presidential election. Even within the swing state of Ohio, Stark County is regarded as a quintessential bellwether, and thus presidential candidates have typically made multiple visits to the region. Major media outlets typically pay close attention to the election results in the county. The New York Times in particular has covered the county's citizens and their voting concerns in a series of features each election cycle for over a decade.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 581 square miles (1,500 km2), of which 575 square miles (1,490 km2) is land and 5.3 square miles (14 km2) (0.9%) is water.[6]

Adjacent counties

Major Highways

  • I-77
  • US 30
  • US 62
  • US 250
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National protected area

  • First Ladies National Historic Site

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 2,734
1820 12,406 353.8%
1830 26,588 114.3%
1840 34,603 30.1%
1850 39,878 15.2%
1860 42,978 7.8%
1870 52,508 22.2%
1880 64,031 21.9%
1890 84,170 31.5%
1900 94,747 12.6%
1910 122,987 29.8%
1920 177,218 44.1%
1930 221,784 25.1%
1940 234,887 5.9%
1950 283,194 20.6%
1960 340,345 20.2%
1970 372,210 9.4%
1980 378,823 1.8%
1990 367,585 −3.0%
2000 378,098 2.9%
2010 375,586 −0.7%
U.S. decennial census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990–2000[10] 2020 [11]

2000 census

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 378,098 people, 148,316 households, and 102,782 families living in the county. The population density was 656 people per square mile (253/km2). There were 157,024 housing units at an average density of 272 per square mile (105/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 90.28% white, 7.20% black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 1.43% from two or more races. 0.92% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 148,316 households, out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.20% were married couples living together, 11.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.70% were non-families. 26.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.80% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.80% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 15.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,824, and the median income for a family was $47,747. Males had a median income of $37,065 versus $23,875 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,417. About 6.80% of families and 9.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.90% of those under age 18 and 6.60% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 375,586 people, 151,089 households, and 100,417 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 652.9 inhabitants per square mile (252.1 /km2). There were 165,215 housing units at an average density of 287.2 per square mile (110.9 /km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 88.7% white, 7.6% black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.5% from other races, and 2.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.6% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 33.6% were German, 15.5% were Irish, 10.1% were English, 10.1% were Italian, and 7.7% were American.[15]

Of the 151,089 households, 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.5% were non-families, and 28.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.96. The median age was 41.1 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $44,941 and the median income for a family was $55,976. Males had a median income of $44,238 versus $31,896 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,015. About 9.5% of families and 12.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.5% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Politics

Stark County has often been described as "the swing county, in the swing state" when it comes to presidential elections. Locally, it has generally been a strong Republican area, but that changed in the 1990s and into 2000s, where it remained highly competitive for both parties. In 1992 it became a swing county that tilted Democratic, and over the next 15-20 years more local office holders were Democrats. That has changed, however, in the last 10 years or so, beginning in 2010. Republicans now hold most of the local elected positions.

United States presidential election results for Stark County, Ohio[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 111,097 58.44% 75,904 39.93% 3,092 1.63%
2016 98,388 55.85% 68,146 38.68% 9,631 5.47%
2012 88,581 48.74% 89,432 49.21% 3,733 2.05%
2008 86,743 46.14% 96,990 51.59% 4,277 2.27%
2004 92,215 48.93% 95,337 50.59% 907 0.48%
2000 78,153 48.89% 75,308 47.11% 6,383 3.99%
1996 60,212 38.03% 73,437 46.38% 24,697 15.60%
1992 61,863 35.33% 70,064 40.02% 43,165 24.65%
1988 87,087 55.08% 69,639 44.05% 1,370 0.87%
1984 98,434 59.69% 65,157 39.51% 1,325 0.80%
1980 87,769 55.87% 59,005 37.56% 10,332 6.58%
1976 72,607 49.83% 70,012 48.05% 3,090 2.12%
1972 92,110 62.74% 51,565 35.12% 3,135 2.14%
1968 68,414 47.88% 57,675 40.36% 16,799 11.76%
1964 53,632 37.68% 88,704 62.32% 0 0.00%
1960 82,881 55.22% 67,205 44.78% 0 0.00%
1956 83,667 62.85% 49,445 37.15% 0 0.00%
1952 74,929 57.66% 55,031 42.34% 0 0.00%
1948 51,482 51.40% 47,533 47.46% 1,135 1.13%
1944 51,506 47.30% 57,393 52.70% 0 0.00%
1940 46,384 43.81% 59,496 56.19% 0 0.00%
1936 34,693 35.91% 57,931 59.96% 3,988 4.13%
1932 40,672 51.06% 35,757 44.89% 3,225 4.05%
1928 59,564 70.85% 23,840 28.36% 671 0.80%
1924 40,858 64.28% 12,544 19.74% 10,160 15.98%
1920 37,483 62.88% 18,437 30.93% 3,688 6.19%
1916 14,159 45.23% 15,316 48.93% 1,828 5.84%
1912 6,033 22.57% 9,908 37.07% 10,788 40.36%
1908 14,112 50.48% 12,286 43.95% 1,559 5.58%
1904 15,695 65.46% 6,919 28.86% 1,361 5.68%
1900 13,165 54.12% 10,651 43.79% 509 2.09%
1896 12,111 51.13% 11,339 47.87% 235 0.99%
1892 9,231 44.79% 10,227 49.63% 1,150 5.58%
1888 8,763 47.29% 9,094 49.07% 674 3.64%
1884 8,315 49.62% 7,955 47.47% 487 2.91%
1880 7,264 50.21% 6,965 48.14% 238 1.65%
1876 6,410 48.16% 6,772 50.88% 128 0.96%
1872 5,817 52.30% 5,250 47.20% 55 0.49%
1868 5,601 53.10% 4,948 46.90% 0 0.00%
1864 4,797 52.84% 4,282 47.16% 0 0.00%
1860 4,064 52.98% 2,820 36.76% 787 10.26%
1856 3,770 50.73% 3,633 48.88% 29 0.39%



Government

Elected officials[18]

  • Commissioners: Janet Weir Creighton (R), Bill Smith (R), Richard Regula (R)
  • Auditor: Alan Harold (R)
  • Clerk of Courts: Lynn Todaro (R)
  • Judges of the Court of Common Pleas: Hon. Kristin Farmer (R), Hon. Natalie Haupt (D), Hon. Taryn L. Heath (D), Hon. Francis G. Forchione (D), Hon Chryssa Hartnett (D)
  • Coroner: Ron Rusnak M.D. (R)
  • Engineer: Keith Bennett (D)
  • Family Court: Hon. Rosemarie Hall (R), Hon Jim D. James (R), Hon David R. Nist (R)
  • Probate Court: Hon. Dixie Park (R)
  • Prosecutor: Kyle Stone (R)
  • Recorder: Jamie Walters (R)
  • Sheriff: George Maier (D)
  • Treasurer: Alex Zumbar (R)

Education

Colleges and universities

  • Kent State University at Stark
  • Malone University
  • Stark State College
  • University of Mount Union
  • Walsh University

Community, junior, and technical colleges

  • R. G. Drage Career Technical Center

Public school districts

  • Alliance City School District
  • Canton City School District
  • Canton Local School District
  • Fairless Local School District
  • Jackson Local School District
  • Lake Local School District
  • Louisville City School District
  • Marlington Local School District
  • Massilon City School District
  • Minerva Local School District
  • North Canton City School District
  • Northwest Local School District
  • Osnaburg Local School District
  • Perry Local School District
  • Plain Local School District
  • Sandy Valley Local School District
  • Tuslaw Local School District

High schools

  • Alliance High School
  • Canton McKinley High School
  • Canton South High School
  • Central Catholic High School
  • East Canton High School
  • Fairless High School
  • GlenOak High School
  • Heritage Christian School
  • Hoover High School
  • Indian River High School
  • Jackson High School
  • Jackson School for the Arts
  • Lake Center Christian School
  • Lake High School
  • Louisville High School
  • Marlington High School
  • Massillon Christian School
  • Minerva High School
  • Northwest High School
  • Perry High School
  • St. Thomas Aquinas High School
  • Washington High School

Communities

Map of Stark County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Cities

  • Alliance
  • Canal Fulton
  • Canton (county seat)
  • Louisville
  • Massillon
  • North Canton

Villages

  • Beach City
  • Brewster
  • East Canton
  • East Sparta
  • Hartville
  • Hills and Dales
  • Magnolia
  • Minerva
  • Meyers Lake
  • Navarre
  • Waynesburg
  • Wilmot

Townships

Prior to 1815, Stark County consisted of only eight large townships.[19] After a number of partitions and a few transfers between counties, the townships are:

  • Bethlehem
  • Canton
  • Jackson
  • Lake
  • Lawrence
  • Lexington
  • Marlboro
  • Nimishillen
  • Osnaburg
  • Paris
  • Perry
  • Pike
  • Plain
  • Sandy
  • Sugar Creek
  • Tuscarawas
  • Washington

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated places

  • Bolton
  • Greentown
  • Harrisburg
  • Limaville
  • Marlboro
  • Middlebranch
  • North Industry
  • North Lawrence
  • Perry Heights
  • Reedurban
  • Richville
  • Robertsville
  • Uniontown

Other unincorporated communities

  • Avondale
  • Cairo
  • Crystal Springs
  • East Greenville
  • Freeburg
  • Justus
  • Mapleton
  • Marchand
  • Maximo
  • McDonaldsville
  • New Baltimore
  • New Franklin
  • Newman
  • Paris
  • Pigeon Run
  • Sippo
  • Waco

See also

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Stark County, Ohio

References

  1. ^ 2020 census
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Ohio: Individual County Chronologies". Ohio Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/OH_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  4. ^ "Stark County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39151&sid=0. 
  5. ^ Perrin, William Henry (1881). History of Stark County, with an outline sketch of Ohio. Chicago: Baskin & Battey. https://archive.org/details/historyofstarkco00perr. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ 2020 census
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39151. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39151. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39151. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39151. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  18. ^ Stark County Elected Officials Script error: No such module "webarchive".
  19. ^ U.S. GenWeb: Ohio, Stark County, accessed February 2018.

External links

Coordinates: 40°49′N 81°22′W / 40.81, -81.37

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