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Summit County, Ohio
SummitCountyCourt.jpg
Summit County Courthouse
Seal of Summit County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Summit County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 3, 1840[1][2]
Named for the highest elevation on the Ohio and Erie Canal
Seat Akron
Largest city Akron
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

419.38 sq mi (1,086 km²)
412.08 sq mi (1,067 km²)
7.3 sq mi (19 km²), 1.7%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

540,428
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional districts 11th, 13th, 14th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.co.summit.oh.us

Summit County is an urban county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 540,428[3] making it the fourth-most populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Akron.[4] The county was formed on March 3, 1840, from portions of Medina, Portage and Stark Counties. It was named "Summit County" because the highest elevation on the Ohio and Erie Canal is located in the county.[5]

Summit County is part of the Akron, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Cleveland-Akron-Canton, OH Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 419.38 square miles (1,086 km2), of which 412.08 square miles (1,067 km2) is land and 7.3 square miles (19 km2) (1.7%) is water.[6] The largest portion of Cuyahoga Valley National Park is located in the northern part of the county. The southern border of the former Connecticut Western Reserve passes through the southern part of the county, leading to jogs in the east and west borders of the county.

Major highways

  • I-76
  • I-77
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  • I-271
  • I-277
  • I-480
  • US 224
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Adjacent counties

National protected area

  • Cuyahoga Valley National Park (also extends north into Cuyahoga County)

Government

Summit County, along with Cuyahoga County, is one of two of Ohio's 88 counties that have a charter government, as authorized by Article X of the Ohio Constitution. Under its charter, rather than three elected commissioners, Summit County has an elected County Executive and an eleven-member County Council. Eight members of the council are elected from individual districts; the other three are elected at large. Summit County also has an appointed Medical Examiner rather than an elected Coroner, and an elected Fiscal Officer, who exercises the powers and performs the duties of a county auditor, treasurer and recorder. The remaining officials are similar to the officials in other counties. They include the following:

  • Clerk of Courts - Sandra Kurt (D) (elected)[7]
  • Prosecuting Attorney - Sherri Bevan Walsh (D) (elected)
  • Engineer - Alan Brubaker (D) (elected)
  • Sheriff - Kandy Fatheree (D) (elected)
  • Fiscal Officer - Kristen Scalise (D) (elected)

Summit County currently has 14 Common Pleas judges. They are:

  • Kelly McLaughlin (D),
  • Kathryn Michael (D),
  • Christine Croce (R),
  • Amy Corrigall Jones (R),
  • Alison McCarty (R),
  • Tammy O'Brien (R),
  • Joy Oldfield (D),[8]
  • Mary Margaret Rowlands (D),
  • Alison Breaux (D), and
  • Susan Baker Ross (D)
  • Linda Tucci Teodosio (D) (Juvenile Court Judge)
  • Katarina Cook (R) (Domestic Relations Judge)
  • Susan Steinhauer (R) (Domestic Relations Judge) [9]
  • Elinore Marsh Stormer (D) (Probate Judge)

Summit County Council

Summit County has an 11-member council. Three members are elected at-large in mid-term cycles, while eight members are elected from districts coinciding with the Presidential election. The current members of Summit County Council are:

  • Clair Dickinson (D) (at-large)
  • Elizabeth Walters (D) (at-large) [10]
  • John Donofrio (D) (at-large)
  • Rita Darrow (D) (District 1)
  • John Schmidt (D) (District 2)
  • Gloria Rodgers (R) (District 3)
  • Veronica Sims (D) (District 5) [13]
  • Jerry Feeman (D) (District 6)
  • Beth McKenney (R) (District 7)
  • Anthony Devitis (R) (District 8)

* Indicates Council President [12]

County Executives

  • John R. Morgan, 1981–1989
  • Tim Davis, 1989–2001
  • James B. McCarthy (D), 2001–2007[14]
  • Russell M. Pry (D), 2007-2016[15][16][17][18][19]
  • Ilene Shapiro (D), 2016–present

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1840 22,560
1850 27,485 21.8%
1860 27,344 −0.5%
1870 34,674 26.8%
1880 43,788 26.3%
1890 54,089 23.5%
1900 71,715 32.6%
1910 108,253 50.9%
1920 286,065 164.3%
1930 344,131 20.3%
1940 339,405 −1.4%
1950 410,032 20.8%
1960 513,569 25.3%
1970 553,371 7.8%
1980 524,472 −5.2%
1990 514,990 −1.8%
2000 542,899 5.4%
2010 541,781 −0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[20]
1790-1960[21] 1900-1990[22]
1990-2000[23] 2020 [24]

2010 census

As of the 2010 Census, there were 541,781 people, 222,781 households, and 141,110 families residing in the county.[25] The population density was 1,312.6 inhabitants per square mile (506.8 /km2). There were 245,109 housing units at an average density of 593.8 per square mile (229.3 /km2).[26] The racial makeup of the county was 80.6% white, 14.4% black or African American, 2.2% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.5% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.6% of the population.[25] In terms of ancestry, 24.9% were German, 15.3% were Irish, 10.6% were English, 10.1% were Italian, 5.1% were Polish, and 4.5% were American.[27]

Of the 222,781 households, 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.3% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 36.7% were non-families, and 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.98. The median age was 40.0 years.[25]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,926 and the median income for a family was $62,271. Males had a median income of $47,892 versus $35,140 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,676. About 10.0% of families and 13.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.8% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Politics

Like most of Northeast Ohio, Summit is heavily Democratic. It has only voted Republican three times since 1932, all in national Republican landslides– Dwight D. Eisenhower's 1956 victory, and the 49-state sweeps by Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan in 1972 and 1984, respectively.

United States presidential election results for Summit County, Ohio[29]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 124,833 44.38% 151,668 53.92% 4,779 1.70%
2016 112,026 43.03% 134,256 51.57% 14,064 5.40%
2012 111,001 41.36% 153,041 57.03% 4,316 1.61%
2008 113,284 40.66% 160,858 57.73% 4,487 1.61%
2004 118,558 42.91% 156,587 56.67% 1,175 0.43%
2000 96,721 43.02% 119,759 53.26% 8,359 3.72%
1996 73,555 34.18% 112,050 52.07% 29,590 13.75%
1992 77,530 32.10% 107,881 44.67% 56,081 23.22%
1988 101,155 46.92% 112,612 52.23% 1,822 0.85%
1984 115,637 50.99% 109,569 48.32% 1,574 0.69%
1980 92,299 43.35% 102,459 48.12% 18,161 8.53%
1976 80,415 38.41% 123,711 59.09% 5,224 2.50%
1972 112,419 49.92% 108,534 48.19% 4,263 1.89%
1968 82,649 39.56% 100,068 47.89% 26,224 12.55%
1964 68,000 32.33% 142,319 67.67% 0 0.00%
1960 109,066 49.59% 110,852 50.41% 0 0.00%
1956 102,872 52.42% 93,378 47.58% 0 0.00%
1952 91,168 48.34% 97,443 51.66% 0 0.00%
1948 60,174 42.69% 78,096 55.41% 2,680 1.90%
1944 64,696 41.61% 90,783 58.39% 0 0.00%
1940 63,405 41.45% 89,555 58.55% 0 0.00%
1936 38,991 29.16% 91,836 68.69% 2,869 2.15%
1932 47,691 45.03% 53,965 50.95% 4,255 4.02%
1928 78,504 70.86% 31,506 28.44% 775 0.70%
1924 53,774 65.28% 17,533 21.29% 11,064 13.43%
1920 43,721 59.60% 27,857 37.97% 1,785 2.43%
1916 11,593 35.63% 19,343 59.45% 1,603 4.93%
1912 3,502 15.10% 7,786 33.57% 11,904 51.33%
1908 10,365 47.31% 9,930 45.32% 1,614 7.37%
1904 12,451 66.04% 4,618 24.49% 1,786 9.47%
1900 10,072 53.08% 8,413 44.33% 491 2.59%
1896 8,584 51.25% 8,020 47.88% 146 0.87%
1892 6,322 46.45% 6,499 47.75% 790 5.80%
1888 6,455 51.43% 5,495 43.78% 602 4.80%
1884 6,588 55.97% 4,586 38.96% 597 5.07%
1880 5,890 57.73% 4,071 39.90% 241 2.36%
1876 5,055 56.59% 3,804 42.59% 73 0.82%
1872 4,534 62.01% 2,738 37.45% 40 0.55%
1868 4,634 65.47% 2,444 34.53% 0 0.00%
1864 4,204 69.88% 1,812 30.12% 0 0.00%
1860 3,607 65.52% 1,785 32.43% 113 2.05%
1856 3,185 63.64% 1,746 34.89% 74 1.48%



Education

Public School Districts in Summit County and Surrounding Areas

School districts

School districts in Ohio do not strictly follow city corporation limits or township borders. Many of the school districts in Summit County overlap community borders.[30] Below is a list of all public school districts in the county.

  • Akron Public School District
  • Revere Local School District
  • Copley–Fairlawn City School District
  • Woodridge Local School District
  • Hudson City School District
  • Stow-Munroe Falls City School District
  • Cuyahoga Falls City School District
  • Tallmadge City School District
  • Mogadore Local School District
  • Springfield Local School District
  • Coventry Local School District
  • Green Local School District
  • Manchester Local School District
  • Barberton City School District
  • Norton City School District
  • Twinsburg City School District
  • Nordonia Hills City School District
Summit County Public School Enrollment Trends (K-12)[31]
School System 1965[32] 1970[33] 1974-75[34] 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2019
Akron 52,632 55,000 49,835     38,974     35,037     33,230     31,072     30,360     27,764     23,210     21,001     20,723
Cuyahoga Falls 12,000 11,778 10,382        7,846        6,353        5,919        5,807        5,516        5,294        4,964        4,838        4,604
Barberton 7,707 7,444 6,647        5,091        4,635        4,498        4,357        4,237        4,182        3,761        3,802        3,813
Springfield 5,078 5,369 5,114        4,271        3,780        3,167        3,369        3,258        2,976        2,394        2,319        2,153
Stow 5,048 6,650 6,712        5,971        5,252        5,507        5,938        5,926        5,998        5,695        5,215        5,265
Nordonia 4,199 4,927 5,618        4,552        3,390        2,917        3,153        3,642        3,768        4,013        3,692        3,600
Green 3,615 3,973 3,853        3,639        3,130        3,084        3,494        3,871        4,120        4,197        4,052        3,993
Tallmadge 3,527 4,430 4,171        3,265        2,502        2,202        2,585        2,626        2,720        2,601        2,414        2,412
Norton 3,503 4,114 -        3,213        2,560        2,379        2,528        2,543        2,426        2,647        2,489        2,449
Coventry 3,423 3,004 2,763        2,180        1,836        1,684        2,197        2,428        2,305        2,419        2,123        1,864
Copley 3,196 3,790 -        3,018        2,342        2,215        2,471        2,924        3,301        3,322        3,054        2,819
Revere 2,957 3,449 3,404        2,967        2,554        2,516        2,741        2,846        2,829        2,860        2,593        2,696
Hudson 2,429 2,983 3,553        3,721        3,514        3,880        5,154        5,049        5,421        4,866        4,476        4,517
Manchester 2,373 2,919 2,729        2,107        1,702        1,490        1,545        1,470        1,529        1,517        1,328        1,306
Twinsburg 2,146 2,448 2,456        2,321        2,161        2,166        2,694        3,531        4,008        4,242        4,102        4,080
Woodridge 1,689 1,853 1,735        1,298        1,008        1,019        1,192        1,688        1,757        1,936        1,988        1,867
Mogadore 1,478 1,544 1,338        1,074           893           807           805           857           881           919           883           857
County Total   117,000   125,675   110,310     95,508     82,649     78,680     81,102     82,772     81,279     75,563     70,369     69,018

Colleges and universities

Recreation

  • Summit Metro Parks

Communities

Map of Summit County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels. The map denotes New Franklin and Franklin Township as separate entities, predating their 2003 merger.

Cities

  • Akron (county seat)
  • Barberton
  • Cuyahoga Falls
  • Fairlawn
  • Green
  • Hudson
  • Macedonia
  • Munroe Falls
  • New Franklin
  • Norton (partly in Wayne County)
  • Stow
  • Tallmadge
  • Twinsburg

Villages

  • Boston Heights
  • Clinton
  • Lakemore
  • Mogadore
  • Northfield
  • Peninsula
  • Reminderville
  • Richfield
  • Silver Lake

Townships

  • Bath
  • Boston
  • Copley
  • Coventry
  • Northfield Center
  • Richfield
  • Sagamore Hills
  • Springfield
  • Twinsburg

Defunct townships

  • Franklin
  • Green
  • Hudson
  • Norton
  • Northampton
  • Portage
  • Stow

Census-designated places

  • Montrose-Ghent
  • Pigeon Creek
  • Portage Lakes
  • Sawyerwood
  • Twinsburg Heights

Other unincorporated communities

  • Bath
  • Boston
  • Botzum
  • Brandywine
  • Comet
  • Copley
  • Everett
  • Ghent
  • Greensburg
  • Montrose
  • Myersville
  • Western Star

See also

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Summit County, Ohio

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Summit County". Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Summit.pdf. 
  2. ^ "Summit County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39153&sid=0. 
  3. ^ 2020 census
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  5. ^ "Communities in Summit County". https://co.summitoh.net/. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  7. ^ rarmon. "Summit County Democrats appoint Sandra Kurt as clerk of courts". http://www.ohio.com/news/break-news/summit-county-democrats-appoint-sandra-kurt-as-clerk-of-courts-1.654770. 
  8. ^ swarsmith. "Four Summit County judges elected to other courts must be replaced". http://www.ohio.com/news/politics/2016/four-summit-county-judges-elected-to-other-courts-must-be-replaced-1.728390. 
  9. ^ https://www.cleveland.com/court-justice/2021/04/ohio-gov-mike-dewine-appoints-susan-steinhauer-to-summit-county-court-of-common-pleas-domestic-relations-division.html
  10. ^ admin. "Local". http://www.ohio.com/news/local/regional-news-briefs-feb-6-2016-1.659986. 
  11. ^ rarmon. "Democrats appoint Jeff Wilhite to Summit County Council". http://www.ohio.com/news/break-news/democrats-appoint-jeff-wilhite-to-summit-county-council-1.663080. 
  12. ^ a b Mackinnon, Jim. "Wilhite named Summit County Council president, but not without a fight" (in en). https://www.ohio.com/news/20190107/wilhite-named-summit-county-council-president-but-not-without-fight. 
  13. ^ "Former Akron City Councilwoman Veronica Sims appointed to vacant seat on Summit County Council". 2020-01-06. https://www.cleveland.com/akron/2020/01/former-akron-city-councilwoman-veronica-sims-appointed-to-vacant-seat-on-summit-county-council.html. 
  14. ^ McCarthy retired on June 30, 2007. "McCarthy, 67, Turns New Corner,". Akron Beacon Journal, 30 June 2007.
  15. ^ "Pry Biography". http://www.co.summit.oh.us/executive/biopry.htm. 
  16. ^ On July 12, 2007, Pry was appointed by a majority vote of the Summit County Democratic Party's Central Committee to finish the remainder of McCarthy's second term. "Pry Named County Executive." Akron Beacon Journal, 13 July 2007
  17. ^ On November 4, 2008, Pry was elected to a four-year term as County Executive with over 60% of the vote. "Republicans Lose More Ground in Summit Races, Democrats Gain Spot with Brubaker Beating Incumbent Engineer." Akron Beacon Journal, 6 November 2008
  18. ^ On November 6, 2012, Pry was elected to a second four-year term as County Executive with over 62% of the vote. "Democrats Maintain Summit County Seats." Akron Beacon Journal, 7 November 2012
  19. ^ Pry died in office on July 31, 2016 at age 58. "Summit County Executive Russ Pry dies at 58". August 2016. http://www.cleveland.com/akron/index.ssf/2016/07/summit_county_executive_russ_p_1.html. 
  20. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  21. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  22. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  23. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  24. ^ 2020 census
  25. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39153. 
  26. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39153. 
  27. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39153. 
  28. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39153. 
  29. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  30. ^ "Map of School Districts near Akron, Ohio". AkronOhioMoms.com. 2013-05-29. http://www.akronohiomoms.com/life-family/schools-education/do-you-know-how-to-compare-school-districts-near-akron-ohio/. 
  31. ^ "Ohio Department of Education - Enrollment Data". http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Data/Frequently-Requested-Data/Enrollment-Data. 
  32. ^ "Summit County Enrollment Figures". Akron Beacon Journal. 1965-06-06. 
  33. ^ "Summit County Enrollment Figures". Akron Beacon Journal. 1970-09-12. 
  34. ^ "Summit County Enrollment Figures". Akron Beacon Journal. 1974-11-15. 

External links

Coordinates: 41°08′N 81°32′W / 41.13, -81.53

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