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Svyatoslav III Vsevolodovich Rurik of Vladimir, Prince of Novgorod, Prince of Pereyaslavl, Prince of Yuryev, Prince of Suzdal, Grand Prince of Vladimir, was born 27 March 1196 to Vsevolod III Yuryevich of Vladimir (1154-1212) and Mariya Shvarnovna of Ossetia (c1158-c1205) and died 3 February 1252 of unspecified causes. He married Yevdokiya Davydovna of Murom (c1205-c1240) .

Svyatoslav Vsevolodovich (27 March 1196 [1]- 3 February 1252) - the Grand Prince of Vladimir ( 1246 - 1248 ), son of Vsevolod Yuryevich, in baptized Gabriel. During his lifetime, Prince Svyatoslav was Prince of Novgorod, Prince of Pereyaslavl, Prince of Yuryev, Prince of Suzdal and Grand Prince of Vladimir.

Biography

In January 1200, he was appointed to the reign in the Principality of Novgorod, being afterwards replaced by his older brother, Konstantin in 1205 and returned to Novgorod on February 9, 1208 [2]. However, the next winter, Svyatoslav was imprisoned by the invaders who installed Mstislav Mstivlavich Udatnyi as ruler of Novgorod. Svyatoslav was released after the campaign on Torzhok of the troops of the Grand Principality of Vladimir-Suzdal, led by the Yuri Vsevolodovich .

In 1212, after the death of his father, Svyatoslav received the Principality of Yuryev as inheritance. In the beginning of the struggle for the great reign between the older brothers, he first went to Rostov to Konstantin, but then went over to the side of Yuri and took part in the Battle of Lipitsa (1216) .

In 1220 Svyatoslav at the head of the Vladimir army was sent by his elder brother Yuri against the Volga Bulgarians. The expedition was river and ended with the victory of the Russian troops in the Battle of Oshel (1220).

In 1222, Svyatoslav, again at the head of the Vladimir army, was sent by Yuri to help the Novgorodians and their prince Vsevolod, Yuri's son. The 12,000-strong Russian army, in alliance with the Lithuanians, invaded the territory of the Teutonic Order and devastated the neighborhood of Wenden . In 1226, Svyatoslav, along with his younger brother Ivan at the head of the Vladimir army, was sent by Yuri against the Mordvinians and won.

In 1229 Svyatoslav was sent by Yuri to Pereyaslavl-Yuzhny, then returned to the north. In 1230 - 1234 in St. George's on the foundation of the white-stone church of St. George the Great , St. George's Cathedral was built , "miraculously beautiful, adorned with carved stone from the soles and up to the top of the holy faces and holidays, and he himself was a master." In the cathedral there is a relief composition, called by tradition the "Svyatoslav Cross", at the base of which there is a stone with the inscription-dedication of Svyatoslav Vsevolodovich [3][4].

In 1238, took part in the Battle of the Sit River (1238). From the brother of Yaroslav, who had taken the throne of Vladimir, Suzdal became the prince. In 1246, Yaroslav died, and Svyatoslav took the Grand Duke's throne under the old inheritance right. His nephews, seven sons of Yaroslav, he gave to the principality, but the Yaroslavichi were dissatisfied with this distribution. In 1248 he was expelled by his nephew Mikhail Yaroslavich Khorobrit, who soon died in battle with the Lithuanians on the Battle of the Protva River. Then Svyatoslav himself defeated Lithuanians near Zubtsov. According to the will of Yaroslav and at the will of Guyuk the rule of the Grand Principality of Vladimir was taken oven by Andrei Yaroslavich.

In 1250, Svyatoslav and his son Dmitri went to the Horde . In the opinion of the historian AV Exemplarsky , this was an unsuccessful trip with an attempt to return the Grand Duke's throne. The historian VA Kuchkin notes that although the chronicles do not speak explicitly about the purpose of this trip, such trips of Russian princes with sons-heirs to khans were usually carried out when it was a question of securing their principalities-paterns for the Rurik people. Considering that Svyatoslav's grandson already wore the nickname of Yuryevsky, Kuchkin makes the assumption that by that time Sviatoslav owned the Yuriev princedom [5].

After a short grand prince in Vladimir, Prince Svyatoslav returned to Yuryev-Polsky. Here he founded a princely monastery in honor of the Archangel Michael .

The last days of his life the holy prince lived piously, in fasting and prayer, purity and repentance. He died on February 3, 1252 . His body was laid in the cathedral built by St. George the Great Martyr. The relics of the holy and blessed Grand Duke Svyatoslav were re- acquired in 1991 and laid in the Holy Protection Church of the town of St. George's of Poland " Now and now they are the God of the dish and healing, the gift comes with faith by faith ."

Seal of Prince Vsyatoslav Vsevolodovich

Marriage and children

The spouse is the princess Yevdokiya Davydovna of Murom, the daughter of Prince Davyd Yuryevich of Murom and his wife Princess Fevronia (in the monasticism of Euphrosyne), who are revered saints Peter and Fevronia , patrons of the family in Russia.

Prince Svyatoslav divorced in 1228 to enable his wife Yevdokiya to retire tp the Borisoglebsky monastery near Murom, where she was tonsured in monastic life on July 24 at the feast of Boris and Gleb. In the monastery the princess lived until her death and was buried there, the remains are still there.

He had a son, Dmitri Svyatoslavich of Yuryev (c1225-1269). According to ancient saints Svyatoslav Vsevolodovich was revered as a saint [6].

See also

The campaigns of Russian princes against the Order of the Swordmen

Notes

  1. ^ 1195 год, согласно исследованию Бережкова Н. Г. [1]: 6704 г. Лаврентьевской летописи ультрамартовский, повествует о событиях после 6703(1194), когда умер Святослав киевский, но до 6705(1196), когда произошла война между Мономаховичами и Ольговичами.
  2. ^ Бережков Н. Г. Хронология русского летописания
  3. ^ Кавельмахер В. В. Краеугольный камень из лапидария Георгиевского собора в Юрьеве-Польском (к вопросу о так называемом Святославовом кресте)
  4. ^ Композиция, известная под названием «Святославовов крест», была собрана в конце XVIII — начале XIX веков из обломков двух зданий. См. В. В. Кавельмахер. Краеугольный камень из лапидария Георгиевского собора в Юрьеве-Польском (к вопросу о так называемом Святославовом кресте
  5. ^ Кучкин В. А. Гл. 2. (см. список литературы)
  6. ^ Русские святые. Жития святых. Святослав-Гавриил Юрьевский, благоверный князь

Literature

  • Кучкин В. А. «Формирование государственной территории Северо-восточной Руси в X—XIV вв.», Гл. 2.

External links



Children



Offspring of Svyatoslav III Vsevolodovich of Vladimir (Russian: Святослав Всеволодович (князь владимирский)) and Yevdokiya Davydovna of Murom (c1205-c1240)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Dmitri Svyatoslavich of Yuryev (c1225-1269) 1225 Yuryev-Polsky, Yuryev-Polsky Rayon, Vladimir Oblast, Russia 1269 Yuryev-Polsky, Yuryev-Polsky Rayon, Vladimir Oblast, Russia










Siblings



Residences

Footnotes (including sources)

Afil

Svyatoslav III Vsevolodovich of Vladimir (1196-1252)
Born: 27 March 1196 Died: 3 February 1252
Regnal titles


Preceded by
Yaroslav Vladimirovich
Prince of Novgorod
1200–1205
Succeeded by
Konstantin Vsevolodivich
Preceded by
Konstantin Vsevolodivich
Prince of Novgorod
1208–1210
Succeeded by
Mstislav Mstivlavich Udatnyi
Preceded by
'
Prince of Yuryev
1214–1228
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Prince of Pereyaslavl
1228–1230
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Prince of Suzdal
1228–1246
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
Yaroslav Vsevolodovich
Grand Prince of Vladimir
1248–1253
Succeeded by
Mikhail Yaroslavich Khorobrit
Preceded by
'
Prince of Yuryev
1248–1252
Succeeded by
Dmitri Svyatoslavich
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