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Vsevolod Konstantinovich of Yaroslavl, Prince of Yaroslavl, was born 18 June 1210 in Rostov, Rostov Rayon, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia to Konstantin Vsevolodovich of Rostov (1186-1218) and Mariya Mstislavna of Smolensk (c1187-1220) and died 4 March 1238 Battle of the Sit River (1238) of battle wounds.


Biography

Second son of Konstantin Vsevolodovich, Prince of Rostov, Grand Prince of Vladimir Vsevolod Konstantinovich was born in Rostov on June 18, 1210 and followed his father in the various cities where the latter reigned. He was baptized of May 23, 1212, taking the Christian name of Ioann.

In 1215, he was in Torzhok with his father's army, who came to the aid of his uncle Yaroslav Vsevolodovich, then Prince of Pereyaslavl, in his conflict with the Novgorod.

In 1218 Vsevolod received from his father in the fief of Yaroslavl, already, at that time, a big city. According to the "Chronicle of Nikon", during a fire which in 1221 destroyed almost the entire city, 17 churches were burnt down. After their reconstruction, in 1224 Vsevolod added the Church of the Transfiguration of the Saviour Monastery, Yaroslavl, and his father built a few more.

According to the Laurentian Codex, in 1224, Vsevolod with his uncle Vladimir Vsevolodovich were sent by Grand Prince Yuri Vsevolodovich of Vladimir in a military campaign. It, however, the goal of the campaign record does not indicate the event by placing among the Kiev Metropolitan Kirill (occurred January 6, 1225) and large-scale invasion of Lithuanians in the territory of the Novgorod Republic and of the Principality of Smolensk, which ended with the Battle of Uvsyaty (until spring 1225).

In 1226 Vsevolod with his brother Vasilko Konstantinovich of Rostov participated in a campaign of the Grand Duke against Oleg of Kursk, Prince of Chernigov. At the end, the marriage of Vsevolod with Princess Olga Olgovna of Kurst, Oleg's daughter was concluded in 1228.

September 15, 1227 the Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal Yuri Vsevolodovich sent his nephew to Pereyaslav-Khmelnytsky to rule the Principality of Pereyaslavl. In the next year, 1228, Vsevolod went North again and participated Yuri Vsevolodovich's campaign against the Mordovians.

In 1229, Vsevolod was involved in a fight between his uncles, but at in September, Grand Prince Yuri Vsevolodovich was able to invited them for a reconciliation in Suzdal, before the dispute got out of control. In 1230 Vsevolod supported his uncle Yaroslav Vsevolodovich of Vladimir against Mikhail Vsevolodovich of Chernigov in the struggle for influence over Novgorod.

Vsevolod Konstantinovich was killed in the battle of the Sit River (1238) against the Tatars on March 4, 1238. His body was found by the bishop of Rostov Kirill II. He left his sons Vasili + Konstantin, reigned after him.



Children



Offspring of Vsevolod Konstantinovich of Yaroslavl and Olga Olgovna of Kursk (c1211-c1270)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Vasili Vsevolodovich of Yaroslavl (c1228-1249) 1228 Yaroslavl, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia 1249 Vladimir, Vladimir Oblast, Russia Ksenia
Konstantin Vsevolodovich of Yaroslavl (c1230-1255) 1230 Yaroslavl, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia 16 July 1257 Yaroslavl, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia (Battle of Mount Tugov)












Siblings

#g1: Offspring of Konstantin Vsevolodovich of Rostov (1186-1218) and Mariya Mstislavna of Smolensk (c1187-1220)
Name Birth Death Joined with
Vasilko Konstantinovich of Rostov (1209-1238) 9999, Rostov, Rostov Rayon, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia 4 March 1238, Noginsk Rayon, Moscow Oblast, Russia Mariya Mikhailovna of Chernigov (c1211-1271)
Vsevolod Konstantinovich of Yaroslavl (1210-1238) 18 June 1210, Rostov, Rostov Rayon, Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia 4 March 1238, Russia Olga Olgovna of Kursk (c1211-c1270)
Vladimir Konstantinovich of Uglich (1214-1249) 1214, 27 December 1249, Vladimir, Vladimir Oblast, Russia Yevdokiya Ingvarevna of Ryazan (c1216-1278)


Residences

Footnotes (including sources)

Regnal titles
Preceded by
-
Prince of Yaroslavl
1218–1238
Succeeded by
Vasili Vsevolodovich of Yaroslavl (bef1238-1249)
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