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Ward County, North Dakota
WARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE.jpg
Ward County Courthouse
Map of North Dakota highlighting Ward County
Location in the state of North Dakota
Map of the U.S. highlighting North Dakota
North Dakota's location in the U.S.
Founded April 14, 1885 (created)
November 23, 1885 (organized)
Named for Mark Ward
Seat Minot
Largest city Minot
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

2,056 sq mi (5,325 km²)
2,013 sq mi (5,214 km²)
43 sq mi (111 km²), 2.1
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

69,919
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.ward.nd.us

Ward County is a county in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2020 census, the population was 69,919,[1] making it the fourth-most populous county in North Dakota. Its county seat is Minot.[2]

Ward County is part of the Minot, ND Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

The Dakota Territory legislature created the county on April 14, 1885, with areas partitioned from Renville, Stevens, and Wynn counties (Stevens and Wynn counties are now extinct). The county government was not organized at that date; the organization was effected on November 23 of that year. The county was named for Mark Ward, chairman of the House of Representatives Committee on Counties during the session. Burlington was the county seat; this was changed to Minot in 1888.[3]

The boundaries of Ward County were altered two times in 1887, and in 1892, 1909 and 1910. The present county boundaries have been in place since 1910.[4]

Until 1908, Ward County included what is now Burke, Mountrail, and Renville counties; this landmass often being referred to as 'Imperial Ward' County and which was the largest county in the state at the time. In 1908, voters took up measures to partition the county. The results for that portion forming Mountrail County were accepted but the results for the portions that would become Burke and Renville counties were disputed in court, which resulted in favorable rulings in 1910. When the proposed county lines for Burke and Renville counties were drawn, neither group wanted to include Kenmare and risk that city's becoming the county seat, so Kenmare was left in Ward County at the end of a narrow strip of land, commonly referred to as the 'gooseneck'.[5]

Geography[]

The Des Lacs River flows southeasterly through the northeast part of the county before doubling to the northeast on its journey to Lake Winnipeg. The county terrain consists of low rolling hills, dotted with ponds and lakes in its southern part, and carved by drainage gullies. The area is largely devoted to agriculture.[6] The terrain slopes to the east and north, with its highest point near the southwest corner, at 2,175' (663m) ASL.[7] The county has a total area of 2,056 square miles (5,330 km2), of which 2,013 square miles (5,210 km2) is land and 43 square miles (110 km2) (2.1%) is water.[8] It is the fifth-largest county in North Dakota by land area.

Major highways[]

  • US 2.svg U.S. Highway 2
  • US 52.svg U.S. Highway 52
  • US 83.svg U.S. Highway 83
  • North Dakota 5.svg North Dakota Highway 5
  • North Dakota 23.svg North Dakota Highway 23
  • North Dakota 28.svg North Dakota Highway 28
  • North Dakota 50.png North Dakota Highway 50

Adjacent counties[]

Protected areas[]

  • Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • Hiddenwood National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • National Wildfowl Production Areas[6]
  • Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge (part)

Lakes[6][]

  • Carpenter Lake
  • Douglas Lake (part)
  • Hiddenwood Lake (part)
  • Makoti Lake
  • Rice Lake
  • Rush Lake

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1890 1,681
1900 7,961 373.6%
1910 25,221 216.8%
1920 28,811 14.2%
1930 33,597 16.6%
1940 31,981 −4.8%
1950 34,782 8.8%
1960 47,072 35.3%
1970 58,560 24.4%
1980 58,392 −0.3%
1990 57,921 −0.8%
2000 58,975 1.8%
2010 61,675 4.6%
Est. 2021 69,071 17.1%
US Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2020[1]

2000 census[]

As of the 2000 census, there were 58,795 people, 23,041 households, and 15,368 families in the county. The population density was 29.2/sqmi (11.3/km2). There were 25,097 housing units at an average density of 12.5/sqmi (4.81/km2). The county is predominately White (92.40%), with African Americans and Native Americans making up 2.22% and 2.07% respectively. Asians and Pacific Islanders made up less than 1% of the population. Other races and those that identified as being two or more races made up 2.43%. 1.91% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 34.7% were of German ancestry and 27.9% Norwegian ancestry.

There were 23,041 households, out of which 34.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.20% were married couples living together, 8.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.30% were non-families. 27.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.01.

The county population contained 26.20% under the age of 18, 13.00% from 18 to 24, 29.10% from 25 to 44, 19.20% from 45 to 64, and 12.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 99.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,670, and the median income for a family was $41,342. Males had a median income of $27,980 versus $19,830 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,926. About 7.90% of families and 10.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.50% of those under age 18 and 8.40% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 census, there were 61,675 people, 25,029 households, and 15,597 families in the county.[13] The population density was 30.6/sqmi (11.8/km2). There were 26,744 housing units at an average density of 13.3/sqmi (5.13/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 90.3% white, 2.6% American Indian, 2.5% black or African American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 0.7% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 3.0% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 44.4% were German, 30.8% were Norwegian, 11.6% were Irish, 5.7% were English, and 2.3% were American.[15]

Of the 25,029 households, 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.7% were non-families, and 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age was 32.7 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $48,793 and the median income for a family was $60,361. Males had a median income of $37,569 versus $28,415 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,326. About 6.7% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.0% of those under age 18 and 10.3% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Communities[]

Cities[]

  • Berthold
  • Burlington
  • Carpio
  • Des Lacs
  • Donnybrook
  • Douglas
  • Kenmare
  • Makoti
  • Minot (county seat)
  • Ryder
  • Sawyer
  • Surrey

Census-designated places[]

  • Foxholm
  • Logan
  • Minot AFB
  • Ruthville

Unincorporated communities[6][]

  • Aurelia - (ghost town)
  • Drady
  • Gassman - founded when the Gassman Creek Coulee trestle was being built, now referred to as "Trestle Valley"
  • Hartland - (ghost town)
  • Hesnault
  • Lonetree
  • Rice Lake - community at Rice Lake near Minot
  • South Prairie
  • Wolseth

Historical areas[6][]

  • Harrison - early community, now part of Minot
  • Ralston - railroad siding
  • Waldorf - early community, now part of Minot

Townships[]

  • Afton
  • Anna
  • Baden
  • Berthold
  • Brillian
  • Burlington
  • Burt
  • Cameron
  • Carbondale
  • Carpio
  • Denmark
  • Des Lacs
  • Elmdale
  • Eureka
  • Evergreen
  • Foxholm
  • Freedom
  • Gasman
  • Greely
  • Greenbush
  • Harrison
  • Hiddenwood
  • Hilton
  • Iota Flat
  • Kenmare
  • Kirkelie
  • Linton
  • Lund
  • Mandan
  • Margaret
  • Maryland
  • Mayland
  • McKinley
  • Nedrose
  • New Prairie
  • Newman
  • Orlien
  • Passport
  • Ree
  • Rice Lake
  • Rolling Green
  • Rushville
  • Ryder
  • St. Marys
  • Sauk Prairie
  • Sawyer
  • Shealy
  • Spencer
  • Spring Lake
  • Sundre
  • Surrey
  • Tatman
  • Tolgen
  • Torning
  • Vang
  • Waterford
  • Willis

Politics[]

Ward County voters are traditionally and increasingly Republican. In only one national election since 1944 (1964) has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate. In 2020, Donald Trump received 70.7% of the vote in this county, the highest for any candidate since Theodore Roosevelt, although his margin relative to his Democratic opponent declined from 2016, most likely due to the high number of third party votes from the 2016 election cycle in Ward County.

United States presidential election results for Ward County, North Dakota[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 19,974 70.71% 7,293 25.82% 979 3.47%
2016 18,636 67.98% 5,806 21.18% 2,970 10.83%
2012 16,230 63.74% 8,441 33.15% 792 3.11%
2008 15,061 58.45% 10,144 39.37% 563 2.18%
2004 17,008 66.41% 8,236 32.16% 368 1.44%
2000 13,997 62.26% 7,533 33.51% 952 4.23%
1996 10,546 48.01% 8,660 39.43% 2,758 12.56%
1992 12,056 46.63% 7,856 30.39% 5,940 22.98%
1988 13,179 56.74% 9,906 42.65% 143 0.62%
1984 16,077 68.06% 7,336 31.05% 210 0.89%
1980 14,997 67.59% 5,554 25.03% 1,638 7.38%
1976 12,751 56.12% 9,484 41.74% 486 2.14%
1972 13,900 66.61% 6,706 32.14% 262 1.26%
1968 9,079 53.11% 7,105 41.56% 911 5.33%
1964 6,798 38.33% 10,871 61.30% 66 0.37%
1960 9,680 54.83% 7,954 45.06% 19 0.11%
1956 9,042 60.96% 5,762 38.85% 28 0.19%
1952 10,130 66.60% 4,966 32.65% 115 0.76%
1948 5,514 48.64% 5,189 45.77% 634 5.59%
1944 5,514 48.30% 5,822 50.99% 81 0.71%
1940 6,519 45.61% 7,669 53.66% 105 0.73%
1936 3,142 22.36% 8,872 63.12% 2,041 14.52%
1932 4,195 33.23% 8,129 64.38% 302 2.39%
1928 6,561 59.72% 4,362 39.71% 63 0.57%
1924 4,166 47.99% 721 8.31% 3,794 43.70%
1920 6,166 67.41% 2,291 25.05% 690 7.54%
1916 1,743 35.43% 2,791 56.74% 385 7.83%
1912 686 19.59% 1,071 30.58% 1,745 49.83%
1908 5,286 57.39% 3,163 34.34% 761 8.26%
1904 4,349 78.15% 914 16.42% 302 5.43%
1900 880 68.06% 364 28.15% 49 3.79%
1896 299 60.28% 193 38.91% 4 0.81%
1892 182 58.52% 0 0.00% 129 41.48%



See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Ward County, North Dakota

References[]

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Ward County, North Dakota" (in en). United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/wardcountynorthdakota/PST045221. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "County History". Official Portal for North Dakota State Government. http://www.nd.gov/content.htm?parentCatID=83&id=County%20History. 
  4. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/DAKs_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  5. ^ Wick, Douglas A.. "Kenmare (Ward County)". North Dakota Place Names. http://www.webfamilytree.com/North_Dakota_Place_Names/K/kenmare_%28ward_county%29.htm. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Ward County ND Google Maps (accessed February 22, 2019)
  7. ^ ""Find an Altitude/Ward County ND" Google Maps (accessed February 22, 2019)". https://www.daftlogic.com/sandbox-google-maps-find-altitude.htm. 
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_38.txt. 
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (April 20, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/nd190090.txt. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  13. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US38101. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US38101. 
  15. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US38101. 
  16. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US38101. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 48°13′N 101°33′W / 48.22, -101.55


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Ward County, North Dakota. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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