Familypedia
Advertisement
This article is based on the corresponding article in another wiki. For Familypedia purposes, it requires significantly more historical detail on phases of this location's development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there. Also desirable are links to organizations that may be repositories of genealogical information..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can.


Warren County, Tennessee
Warren-County-Courthouse2-tn.jpg
Warren County Courthouse in McMinnville
Map of Tennessee highlighting Warren County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the U.S. highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Founded 1807
Named for Joseph Warren[1]
Seat McMinnville
Largest city McMinnville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

434 sq mi (1,124 km²)
433 sq mi (1,121 km²)
1.4 sq mi (4 km²), 3%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

40,953 increase
92/sq mi (36/km²)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.warrencountytn.gov

Warren County is a county located on the Cumberland Plateau in Middle Tennessee, one of the three Grand Divisions of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 40,953.[2] Its county seat is McMinnville.[3] Warren County comprises the McMinnville, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[]

Warren County was created in 1807 from a portion of White County, and named for Joseph Warren (1741–1775), a soldier in the American Revolution.[1] The revised Tennessee State Constitution of 1834 stated that no new county could be within 12 miles (19 km) of the county seat of the county from which it was formed. The boundaries of five counties formed from Warren— Grundy, Van Buren, Cannon, Coffee and DeKalb— were exactly 12 miles from Warren's county seat, McMinnville, giving the county its distinctive round shape.[1] Warren County was the site of several saltpeter mines. Saltpeter is the main ingredient of gunpowder and was obtained by leaching the earth from several local caves. Hubbards Cave, near Camp Woodlee, was a major operation. Henshaw Cave on Cardwell Mountain (now part of Cumberland Caverns) and Solomon Saltpeter Cave on Ben Lomond Mountain were relatively small mining operations. Most saltpeter mining occurred during the War of 1812 and in the Civil War.[4]

The county was largely developed for farming of such crops as tobacco and hemp. While numerous families held enslaved African Americans as workers, they were a minority of the population. Warren County citizens voted to secede from the Union before the American War Between the States in February 1861 in a state referendum. Voters in Tennessee overall decided to remain in the Union in that time. When President Abraham Lincoln demanded that Tennessee provide troops to fight against the Southern states in April 1861, it was viewed as a violation of Article 3, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution. At a new referendum in June 1861, Warren County again, along with a majority of Tennessee's counties, voted for secession. Unlike in some states, slavery was not listed as one of the reasons in Tennessee's secession proclamation.[5]

Men from Warren County and surrounding upper Cumberland region formed and served in many units in Tennessee's defense, including the 16th Tennessee Infantry [1] Script error: No such module "webarchive". led by McMinnville resident Col. John Houston Savage. The Confederate monument [2] next to the county courthouse is dedicated in the memory of the men who served and died in the 16th and lists their names.

Men from Warren County and upper Cumberland area joined the 16th TN Infantry Regiment, among others. Their flag is on display at the Texas 'Civil War' Museum in Fort Worth TX.[6]

Geography[]

Twin Falls at Rock Island State Park

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 434 square miles (1,120 km2), of which 433 square miles (1,120 km2) is land and 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2) (0.3%) is water.[7] The county lies long the Eastern Highland Rim, near the Cumberland Plateau.

The Caney Fork forms part of the county's borders with White and DeKalb counties to the north. The Rocky River, a tributary of the Caney Fork, forms part of the county's eastern border with Van Buren County. The Collins River, also a tributary of the Caney Fork, flows through the county, and the Barren Fork, a tributary of the Collins, flows through McMinnville.

Cardwell Mountain is an imposing natural feature located five miles due east of McMinnville. It is an erosional remnant of the nearby Cumberland Plateau. Cardwell Mountain is noted for Cumberland Caverns, an exceptionally long cave which lies underneath the mountain.

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

  • US 70S.svg U.S. Route 70S
  • Tennessee 8.svg State Route 8
  • Tennessee 30.svg State Route 30
  • Tennessee 55.svg State Route 55
  • Tennessee 56.svg State Route 56
  • Secondary Tennessee 108.svg State Route 108
  • Secondary Tennessee 136.svg State Route 136

State protected areas[]

  • Hubbard's Cave State Natural Area
  • Morrison Meadow State Natural Area
  • Rock Island State Park (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 5,725
1820 10,348 80.8%
1830 15,210 47.0%
1840 10,803 −29.0%
1850 10,179 −5.8%
1860 11,147 9.5%
1870 12,714 14.1%
1880 14,079 10.7%
1890 14,413 2.4%
1900 16,410 13.9%
1910 16,534 0.8%
1920 17,306 4.7%
1930 20,209 16.8%
1940 19,764 −2.2%
1950 22,271 12.7%
1960 23,102 3.7%
1970 26,972 16.8%
1980 32,653 21.1%
1990 32,992 1.0%
2000 38,276 16.0%
2010 39,839 4.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2020[2]

Age pyramid Warren County[12]

2020 census[]

Warren County racial composition[13]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 33,980 82.97%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 1,090 2.66%
Native American 84 0.21%
Asian 258 0.63%
Pacific Islander 10 0.02%
Other/Mixed 1,588 3.88%
Hispanic or Latino 3,943 9.63%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 40,953 people, 15,727 households, and 10,167 families residing in the county.

2000 census[]

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 38,276 people, 15,181 households, and 10,824 families residing in the county. The population density was 88 people per square mile (34/km2). There were 16,689 housing units at an average density of 39 per square mile (15/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.66% White, 3.16% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 3.56% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. 4.92% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 15,181 households, out of which 31.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.20% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.70% were non-families. 25.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.20% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 13.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,920, and the median income for a family was $37,835. Males had a median income of $28,409 versus $20,863 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,759. About 13.00% of families and 16.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.40% of those under age 18 and 17.20% of those age 65 or over.

Recreation[]

Rock Island State Park is located on the northeastern border with White County. This park is the site of the Tennessee Valley Authority's Great Falls Dam, includes many hiking trails, and offers whitewater rafting.

Cumberland Caverns, located east of McMinnville under Cardwell Mountain, is Tennessee's largest show cave. It is the second longest mapped cave in Tennessee with 27.6 miles (44.4 km) of passages, and displays some of the largest cave rooms in eastern North America.[15] Cumberland Caverns is the 15th longest cave in the United States.[16]

Hubbard's Cave, the largest gray bat hibernaculum in Tennessee, with over 100,000 bats, is located in the county. The cave is owned by the Nature Conservancy and it is securely gated to protect the bats, which are an Endangered Species.

Falcon Rest, an 1896 Victorian mansion in McMinnville built by local manufacturer Clay Faulkner, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). It is open to the public as a historic house museum.[17] His father's mansion in the same city, Falconhurst, is also on the NRHP.

Communities[]

Railroad bridge over Barren Fork in McMinnville

City[]

Towns[]

  • Centertown
  • Morrison
  • Viola

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Berea
  • Bratchers Crossroads
  • Campaign
  • Daylight
  • Irving College
  • Midway
  • Rock Island
  • Shady Rest
  • Smartt
  • Spring Creek
  • Stewart Chapel

Politics[]

United States presidential election results for Warren County, Tennessee[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 11,850 74.02% 3,924 24.51% 235 1.47%
2016 9,540 70.09% 3,535 25.97% 537 3.95%
2012 8,010 61.54% 4,752 36.51% 253 1.94%
2008 8,562 59.46% 5,515 38.30% 323 2.24%
2004 7,503 52.10% 6,808 47.28% 89 0.62%
2000 5,552 42.28% 7,378 56.19% 201 1.53%
1996 4,226 36.33% 6,389 54.92% 1,018 8.75%
1992 3,704 29.98% 7,189 58.19% 1,462 11.83%
1988 4,529 49.13% 4,646 50.40% 43 0.47%
1984 4,811 49.64% 4,813 49.66% 67 0.69%
1980 3,680 37.16% 6,021 60.79% 203 2.05%
1976 2,364 25.94% 6,666 73.13% 85 0.93%
1972 3,565 60.49% 2,118 35.93% 211 3.58%
1968 1,858 24.07% 2,046 26.51% 3,814 49.42%
1964 1,754 25.87% 5,027 74.13% 0 0.00%
1960 2,682 45.92% 3,119 53.40% 40 0.68%
1956 1,954 32.58% 4,014 66.92% 30 0.50%
1952 1,912 34.68% 3,568 64.72% 33 0.60%
1948 807 18.08% 2,969 66.51% 688 15.41%
1944 848 24.73% 2,560 74.66% 21 0.61%
1940 546 18.91% 2,323 80.46% 18 0.62%
1936 553 19.27% 2,304 80.28% 13 0.45%
1932 410 14.83% 2,325 84.09% 30 1.08%
1928 923 45.18% 1,111 54.38% 9 0.44%
1924 490 26.15% 1,356 72.36% 28 1.49%
1920 1,010 33.53% 1,986 65.94% 16 0.53%
1916 624 24.98% 1,855 74.26% 19 0.76%
1912 339 14.43% 1,745 74.26% 266 11.32%
1908 729 31.29% 1,573 67.51% 28 1.20%
1904 707 27.20% 1,815 69.83% 77 2.96%
1900 672 25.87% 1,926 74.13% 0 0.00%
1896 842 28.04% 2,101 69.96% 60 2.00%
1892 633 24.22% 1,568 59.98% 413 15.80%
1888 636 23.77% 1,975 73.80% 65 2.43%
1884 532 23.08% 1,754 76.10% 19 0.82%
1880 482 22.47% 1,577 73.52% 86 4.01%



Warren County was a Democratic stronghold for most of the 20th century. The last Democrat to win Warren County was Al Gore in 2000.[19] After the 2000 election, Warren County began to trend Republican, with each passing election having an increasing margin for the Republican candidate.[20][21] Donald Trump won Warren county in 2016[22] by 42%, compared to Mitt Romney's margin of 25% in 2012.[23]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Warren County, Tennessee

References[]

  1. ^ a b c James Dillon, "Warren County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 23 April 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/47/47177.html. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ Thomas C. Barr, Jr., "Caves of Tennessee", Bulletin 64 of the Tennessee Division of Geology, 1961, 568 pages.
  5. ^ "Ordinances of Secession" (in en). http://www.constitution.org/csa/ordinances_secession.htm#Tennessee. 
  6. ^ http://home.freeuk.com/gazkhan/tenn_battle-flags_h-company.html
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_47.txt. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/tn190090.txt. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  12. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  13. ^ "Explore Census Data". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0500000US47177&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  15. ^ "Cumberland Caverns" by Larry E. Matthews, Second Edition, 2005, ISBN 978-0-9663547-2-0
  16. ^ USA Long Cave List, October 19, 2010, by Bob Gulden.
  17. ^ Falcon Rest official site. Retrieved: 23 April 2013.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  19. ^ "Election Results | Tennessee Secretary of State". https://sos.tn.gov/elections/results#2000. 
  20. ^ "Election Results | Tennessee Secretary of State". https://sos.tn.gov/elections/results#2004. 
  21. ^ "Election Results | Tennessee Secretary of State". https://sos.tn.gov/elections/results#2008. 
  22. ^ "Election Results | Tennessee Secretary of State". https://sos.tn.gov/elections/results#2016. 
  23. ^ "Election Results | Tennessee Secretary of State". https://sos.tn.gov/elections/results#2012. 

External links[]

Commons-logo.png
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Template:Warren County, Tennessee

Coordinates: 35°41′N 85°47′W / 35.68, -85.78

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Warren County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Advertisement