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Warren County, Virginia
Warren County Courthouse cropped.JPG
Warren County Courthouse in Front Royal, Virginia
Seal of Warren County, Virginia
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Warren County
Location in the state of Virginia
Map of the U.S. highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1836
Named for Joseph Warren
Seat Front Royal
Largest town Front Royal
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

217 sq mi (562 km²)
213 sq mi (552 km²)
3.3 sq mi (9 km²), 1.5
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

40,727
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.warrencountyva.net

Warren County is a U.S. county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The 2020 census places Warren County within the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area with a population of 40,727.[1] The county seat is Front Royal.[2]

History[]

By 1672 the entire Shenandoah Valley was claimed for hunting by the Iroquois Confederation following the Beaver Wars. Some bands of the Shawnee settled in the area as client groups to the Iroquois and alternately to the Cherokee after 1721. The Iroquois formally sold their entire claim east of the Alleghenies to the Virginia Colony at the Treaty of Lancaster in 1744.[3] Warren County was established in 1836 from Frederick and Shenandoah counties.[4]:33 At that time the county had a population of 7,000 people, a quarter of which were enslaved.[4]:289 Wedding records show marriages of people born in the 1770s marrying in the 1800s who head households of four to eight "free colored" so the early demographics of the population are unclear.[5]:823–824 Joist Hite lead the Sixteen Families into the Lower Shenandoah Valley.[6] Some consider that group the first European settlers of the area, others believe different claims.[6]:ix Either way, Presbyterians of Scotch-Irish lineage and Quakers followed.[7]

Rail service was established in 1854 with the construction of the Alexandria, Orange and Manassas Gap Railroad between Manassas and Riverton. This line was soon extended to Strasburg in time to become a factor in the Battle of Front Royal on May 23, 1862, and throughout the Civil War. Lumber, agriculture, manufacturing and grain mills provided employment in the region for decades after the Civil War. The county is named for Joseph Warren. During the Civil War the Battle of Front Royal took place in the county on May 23, 1862.[8]:368 On September 23, 1864, William Thomas Overby and five others of then Lt. Col. John S. Mosby's 43rd Virginia Battalion of Partisan Rangers were captured by cavalry troops under the command of then Brig. Gen. George A. Custer in Front Royal out of uniform and were executed as spies.[9]

2019 Warren County Economic Development Authority Executive Director Jennifer McDonald Scandal[]

In 2017, questions were raised about the validity of an alleged $40 million economic development deal that had been brought to the community by Curt Tran, the owner of a company called IT Federal, over the redevelopment of the Avtex Superfund site.[10]

In 2018, Warren County Economic Development Authority executive director Jennifer McDonald was charged with filing false police reports about an alleged rock-throwing incident that she claimed had occurred at her home.[11]

In 2019, McDonald and other parties were embroiled in a massive financial scandal that some observers have characterized as the largest embezzlement scheme in the history of the state of Virginia.[12] The fraud scheme, which involved the alleged embezzlement of $21 million in county funds through fictitious development schemes and insider deals, was uncovered by the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation's Culpeper field office.

The Virginia State Police launched a probe into the business practices of McDonald in conjunction with the Front Royal Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.[12]

Sheriff McEathron, who had been indicted after it was revealed he was McDonald's business partner, committed suicide.[13]

Jennifer McDonald was charged with 32 felony counts for her role in the scheme.[14] 14 current and former municipal officials were indicted and faced criminal charges, including the entire Warren County board of supervisors as well as the former Warren County Attorney and the head of the Warren County schools division.[12][15] These charges were later dropped as the judge ruled there was no basis for the allegations.[16]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 217 square miles (560 km2), of which 213 square miles (550 km2) is land and 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) (1.5%) is water.[17] The highest point is Hogback Mountain in Shenandoah National Park, along the border with Rappahannock County.

Adjacent counties[]

National protected areas[]

  • Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park (part)
  • George Washington National Forest (part)
  • Shenandoah National Park (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1840 5,627
1850 6,607 17.4%
1860 6,442 −2.5%
1870 5,716 −11.3%
1880 7,399 29.4%
1890 8,280 11.9%
1900 8,837 6.7%
1910 8,589 −2.8%
1920 8,852 3.1%
1930 8,340 −5.8%
1940 11,352 36.1%
1950 14,801 30.4%
1960 14,655 −1.0%
1970 15,301 4.4%
1980 21,200 38.6%
1990 26,142 23.3%
2000 31,584 20.8%
2010 37,575 19.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
1790–1960[19] 1900–1990[20]
1990–2000[21] 2010[22] 2020[23]

2020 census[]

Warren County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[22] Pop 2020[23] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 33,345 33,831 88.74% 83.07%
Black or African American alone (NH) 1,709 1,722 4.55% 4.23%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 103 130 0.27% 0.32%
Asian alone (NH) 350 462 0.93% 1.13%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 7 13 0.02% 0.03%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 35 255 0.09% 0.63%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 708 1,901 1.88% 4.67%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 1,318 2,413 3.51% 5.92%
Total 37,575 40,727 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census[]

As of the census[24] of 2000, there were 31,584 people, 12,087 households, and 8,521 families residing in the county. The population density was 148 people per square mile (57/km2). There were 13,299 housing units at an average density of 62 per square mile (24/km2). The demographics of the county is (2000) 92.71% White, 4.83% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 1.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,087 households, out of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.60% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.50% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.60% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 12.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,422, and the median income for a family was $50,487. Males had a median income of $37,182 versus $25,506 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,841. About 6.00% of families and 8.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.70% of those under age 18 and 10.40% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[]

For many years, Avtex Fibers (formerly known as the American Viscose Corporation from 1910 to 1976), was the county's largest employer and taxpayer.[25] At its height, it employed over 800 residents throughout Front Royal and Warren County.

Towards the late 1980s, however, the company's main plant in Front Royal was forced to close as a result of numerous environmental violations, which eventually resulted in the site being declared a Superfund site.[26] The county, reeling from the sudden loss of jobs and tax revenue, established the Warren County Economic Development Authority (WCEDA) to stimulate and diversify its economy as well as the economy of Town of Front Royal, its county seat. The purpose of the WCEDA is to foster and stimulate industry and economic development within Warren County and the town of Front Royal.[27]

Transportation[]

I-66 in Warren County

  • Front Royal Area Transit (FRAT)[28] provides weekday transit for the town of Front Royal.
  • Page County Transit[29] - the People Movers provides weekday transit for the town of Luray and weekday service between Luray and Front Royal.

Major highways[]

  • I-66
  • I-81
  • US 11
  • US 340
  • US 522
  • SR 55
  • SR 79
  • [[Template:Infobox road/VA/link road|Template:Infobox road/VA/abbrev road]]

Education[]

Sonner Hall at Randolph-Macon Academy

Colleges[]

  • Christendom College

Preparatory school[]

  • Randolph-Macon Academy (6-12)

 

Public K-12 schools[]

  • A.S. Rhodes Elementary School[30] (K-5)
  • E. Wilson Morrison Elementary School[31] (K-5)
  • Hilda J. Barbour Elementary School[32] (PreK-5)
  • Leslie Fox Keyser Elementary School[33] (K-5)
  • Ressie Jefferies Elementary School[34] (K-5)
  • Skyline High School (9–12)
  • Warren County High School (9–12)
  • Warren County Middle School[35] (6–8)
  • Skyline Middle School[36] (6-8)

Communities[]

Town[]

Census-designated places[]

  • Apple Mountain Lake
  • Chester Gap (mostly in Rappahannock County)
  • Shenandoah Farms
  • Shenandoah Shores
  • Skyland Estates

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Ashby
  • Bentonville
  • Bethel
  • Browntown
  • Buckton
  • Cedarville
  • Happy Creek
  • Howellsville
  • Karo
  • Limeton
  • Linden
  • Milldale
  • Nineveh
  • Overall
  • Reliance
  • Riverton
  • Rockland
  • Waterlick

Politics[]

Prior to 1952, the county was dominated by the Democratic Party like most counties in Virginia, but between then and 1976, it was a swing county. Since 1980, it has become consistently Republican.

United States presidential election results for Warren County, Virginia[37]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 14,069 66.53% 6,603 31.22% 475 2.25%
2016 11,773 65.58% 5,169 28.80% 1,009 5.62%
2012 9,869 59.10% 6,452 38.64% 377 2.26%
2008 8,879 55.06% 6,997 43.39% 250 1.55%
2004 8,600 61.13% 5,241 37.25% 227 1.61%
2000 6,335 56.73% 4,313 38.63% 518 4.64%
1996 4,657 48.25% 3,814 39.52% 1,181 12.24%
1992 4,319 44.64% 3,554 36.73% 1,803 18.63%
1988 4,700 61.86% 2,769 36.44% 129 1.70%
1984 5,016 65.73% 2,551 33.43% 64 0.84%
1980 3,861 55.79% 2,597 37.53% 462 6.68%
1976 2,985 45.80% 3,221 49.42% 311 4.77%
1972 3,718 69.40% 1,508 28.15% 131 2.45%
1968 2,297 43.37% 1,513 28.57% 1,486 28.06%
1964 1,886 42.96% 2,494 56.81% 10 0.23%
1960 1,842 49.52% 1,850 49.73% 28 0.75%
1956 2,003 58.83% 1,322 38.83% 80 2.35%
1952 1,888 57.90% 1,362 41.77% 11 0.34%
1948 1,016 40.92% 1,291 51.99% 176 7.09%
1944 761 42.32% 1,034 57.51% 3 0.17%
1940 491 26.79% 1,338 73.00% 4 0.22%
1936 426 26.56% 1,174 73.19% 4 0.25%
1932 367 24.93% 1,096 74.46% 9 0.61%
1928 564 44.27% 710 55.73% 0 0.00%
1924 150 16.89% 699 78.72% 39 4.39%
1920 293 28.34% 720 69.63% 21 2.03%
1916 214 26.52% 583 72.24% 10 1.24%
1912 122 16.49% 571 77.16% 47 6.35%
1908 209 26.66% 562 71.68% 13 1.66%
1904 151 21.39% 540 76.49% 15 2.12%
1900 462 29.83% 1,068 68.95% 19 1.23%
1896 575 32.09% 1,172 65.40% 45 2.51%
1892 389 22.66% 1,286 74.90% 42 2.45%
1888 440 26.04% 1,224 72.43% 26 1.54%
1884 316 21.48% 1,155 78.52% 0 0.00%
1880 144 12.70% 990 87.30% 0 0.00%



Notable people[]

  • Thomas Ashby, born in Warren County, physician and Maryland state legislator[38]
  • Thomas M. Allen, born in Warren County, clergyman and university official in Missouri[39]
  • Tareq Salahi, Real Housewives of DC star and infamous White House Gate Crasher[40]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Warren County, Virginia

References[]

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Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  1. ^ "Warren County, Virginia". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/profile?g=0500000US51187. Retrieved January 30, 2022. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Hofstra, Warren (2005). The Planting of New Virginia: Settlement and Landscape in the Shenandoah Valley. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 10–12. ISBN 0801882710. 
  4. ^ a b Wayland, John Walter (1969). A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. Genealogical. pp. 894. 
  5. ^ Heinegg, Paul (2005). Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina from the Colonial Period to about 1820, Volume 2. Genealogical. 
  6. ^ a b Kemp Cartmell, Thomas (1909). Shenandoah Valley Pioneers and Their Descendants: A History of Frederick County, Virginia (illustrated) from Its Formation in 1738 to 1908. Eddy. pp. 587. 
  7. ^ Presbyterians: Template:Hanging indent Quakers: Template:Hanging indent
  8. ^ Forman, Sam (Nov 21, 2011). Dr. Joseph Warren: The Boston Tea Party, Bunker Hill, and the Birth of American Liberty. Pelican. pp. 400. 
  9. ^ Executions: Template:Hanging indent Template:Hanging indent
  10. ^ Casey, Dan. "CASEY: Scandals rock northern Shenandoah Valley town", The Roanoke Times, Virginia, 27 April 2019.
  11. ^ Gully, Josh. "EDA Director Charged With Filing False Police Reports"
  12. ^ a b c McCaslin, John (September 24, 2019). "Warren County's top officials indicted in Front Royal embezzlement scam". The Rappahannock News (online). https://www.insidenova.com/headlines/warren-county-s-top-officials-indicted-in-front-royal-embezzlement/article_bbbaa17c-df28-11e9-bf04-e78ba7699e79.html. 
  13. ^ Bria Llyod. ", Local DVM, 28 May 2019.
  14. ^ Gully, Josh. ", Northern Virginia Daily, Virginia, 28 October 2019.
  15. ^ Olivo, Antonio (September 24, 2019). "Millions of dollars are missing. The sheriff is dead. A small Virginia town wants answers.". The Washington Post (Internet). https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-news/millions-of-dollars-are-missing-the-sheriff-is-dead-a-small-virginia-town-wants-answers/2019/09/24/1a0be2fe-c061-11e9-b873-63ace636af08_story.html. 
  16. ^ Carey, Julie.[1]NBC4 Washington, Virginia, 28 October 2019.
  17. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. https://www.census.gov/geographies/reference-files/time-series/geo/gazetteer-files.html. 
  18. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html. 
  19. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  20. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/va190090.txt. 
  21. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  22. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Warren County, Virginia". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=p2&g=0500000US51187&tid=DECENNIALPL2010.P2. 
  23. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Warren County, Virginia". https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=p2&g=0500000US51187&tid=DECENNIALPL2020.P2. 
  24. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  25. ^ "Board Of Supervisors Reacts To EDA Allegations". Warren County Board of Supervisors. https://www.warrencountyva.net/press-releases/board-of-supervisors-reacts-to-eda-allegations. 
  26. ^ Ayres, B. Drummond Jr. (November 21, 1989). "Jobs Are Lost in Plant Shutdown, but So Is Foul-Smelling Air". https://www.nytimes.com/1989/11/21/us/jobs-are-lost-in-plant-shutdown-but-so-is-foul-smelling-air.html. 
  27. ^ "Bylaws of the Industrial Development Authority of the Town of Front Royal and the County of Warren, Virginia". Warren County Economic Development Agency. December 20, 1994. http://wceda.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Bylaws102717.pdf. 
  28. ^ "Front Royal Area Transit". http://www.ci.front-royal.va.us/frat.asp?M=2&P=10&S=0. 
  29. ^ Page County Transit Script error: No such module "webarchive".
  30. ^ "Welcome to A.S. Rhodes Elementary". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/asr/. 
  31. ^ "Welcome to E. Wilson Morrison Elementary". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/ewm/. 
  32. ^ "Welcome to Hilda J. Barbour Elementary". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/hjb/. 
  33. ^ "Welcome to Leslie Fox Keyser Elementary". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/lfk/. 
  34. ^ "Welcome to Ressie Jeffries Elementary". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/rjes/. 
  35. ^ "Welcome to Warren County Middle School". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/wcms/. 
  36. ^ "Home - Skyline Middle School". http://www.wcps.k12.va.us/sms/. 
  37. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  38. ^ Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume 2. American Historical Society, Inc.. 1919. pp. 439–442. https://books.google.com/books?id=aVMDAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA439. 
  39. ^ Richardson, Robert (1870) (in en). Memoirs of Alexander Campbell: Embracing a View of the Origin, Progress and Principles of the Religious Reformation which He Advocated. J.B. Lippincott & Company. p. 376. https://archive.org/details/memoirsalexande00richgoog. 
  40. ^ Mullins, Luke. "Strange Crazy Afterlife of Real Housewives of DC White House Gate Crasher Tareq Salahi", Washingtonian, Virginia, 27 April 2019.

Coordinates: 38°55′N 78°13′W / 38.91, -78.21


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Warren County, Virginia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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