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Washington County, Maryland
Burnsidebridge.jpg
Burnside's Bridge in Washington County, site of heavy combat during the Battle of Antietam
Flag of Washington County, Maryland
Flag
Seal of Washington County, Maryland
Seal
Map of Maryland highlighting Washington County
Location in the state of Maryland
Map of the U.S. highlighting Maryland
Maryland's location in the U.S.
Founded September 6, 1776
Named for George Washington
Seat Hagerstown
Largest city Hagerstown
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

467 sq mi (1,210 km²)
458 sq mi (1,186 km²)
9.6 sq mi (25 km²), 2.0
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

154,705
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.washco-md.net/

Washington County is located in the western part of the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2020 census, the population was 154,705.[1] Its county seat is Hagerstown.[2] Washington County was the first county in the United States to be named for the Revolutionary War general (and later President) George Washington. Washington County is one of three Maryland counties recognized by the Appalachian Regional Commission as being part of Appalachia.[3] The county borders southern Pennsylvania to the north, Northern Virginia to the south, and the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia to the south and west. Washington County is included in the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Washington-Baltimore-Arlington, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Combined Statistical Area.

History[]

The Washington County seal from 1950 to 1988; de facto as it was never officially adopted.

The western portions of the Province of Maryland (including present Washington County) were incorporated into Prince George's County in 1696. This original county included six current counties. The first to be created was Frederick, separated from Prince George's County in 1748.

Following independence, the sovereign State of Maryland formed Washington County on September 6, 1776, by the division of Frederick County. At the same time, a portion of Frederick County became part of the newly created Montgomery County along with portions from Prince George's County and Charles' County, and was named for General Richard Montgomery. Washington County as created included land later to become Allegany County (created in 1789) and Garrett County (included in Allegany County when it was created in 1789, but separated from Allegany County in 1872). Washington County thus originally included the entire western part of the state.[4]

A number of properties in the county are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[5]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 467 square miles (1,210 km2), of which 458 square miles (1,190 km2) is land and 9.6 square miles (25 km2) (2.0%) is water.[6]

Washington County is located in the Appalachian Mountains, stretching from the Ridge-and-Valley Country in the west to South Mountain in the east, which is an extension of the Blue Ridge. Much of the county lies in the broad Hagerstown Valley between these two zones; the valley is part of the Great Appalachian Valley that continues southward into Virginia and West Virginia as the Shenandoah Valley and northward into Pennsylvania as the Cumberland Valley.

The county is bordered to the north by the Mason–Dixon line with Pennsylvania, to the south by the Potomac River and the states of Virginia and West Virginia, to the west by Sideling Hill Creek and Allegany County, Maryland, and to the east by Frederick County and South Mountain.

Adjacent counties[]

Major highways[]

View south along I-81 from I-70 in Washington County

  • I-68 (MD).svg Interstate 68
  • I-70 (MD).svg Interstate 70
  • I-81 (MD).svg Interstate 81
  • US 11.svg U.S. Route 11
  • US 40.svg U.S. Route 40
  • Alternate plate.svg
    US 40.svg U.S. Route 40 Alternate
  • Template:Jct/plate/MD/1 US 40 Scenic
  • US 340.svg U.S. Route 340
  • US 522.svg U.S. Route 522
  • MD Route 34.svg Maryland Route 34
  • MD Route 56.svg Maryland Route 56
  • MD Route 57.svg Maryland Route 57
  • MD Route 58.svg Maryland Route 58
  • MD Route 60.svg Maryland Route 60
  • MD Route 62.svg Maryland Route 62
  • MD Route 63.svg Maryland Route 63
  • MD Route 64.svg Maryland Route 64
  • MD Route 65.svg Maryland Route 65
  • MD Route 66.svg Maryland Route 66
  • MD Route 67.svg Maryland Route 67
  • MD Route 68.svg Maryland Route 68
  • MD Route 77.svg Maryland Route 77
  • MD Route 144.svg Maryland Route 144
  • MD Route 180.svg Maryland Route 180
  • MD Route 418.svg Maryland Route 418
  • MD Route 491.svg Maryland Route 491
  • MD Route 494.svg Maryland Route 494
  • MD Route 550.svg Maryland Route 550
  • MD Route 615.svg Maryland Route 615
  • MD Route 632.svg Maryland Route 632

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 15,822
1800 18,650 17.9%
1810 18,730 0.4%
1820 23,075 23.2%
1830 25,268 9.5%
1840 28,850 14.2%
1850 30,848 6.9%
1860 31,417 1.8%
1870 34,712 10.5%
1880 38,561 11.1%
1890 39,782 3.2%
1900 45,133 13.5%
1910 49,617 9.9%
1920 59,694 20.3%
1930 65,882 10.4%
1940 68,838 4.5%
1950 78,886 14.6%
1960 91,219 15.6%
1970 103,829 13.8%
1980 113,086 8.9%
1990 121,393 7.3%
2000 131,923 8.7%
2010 147,430 11.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census[]

As of the census of 2010, there were 147,430 people, 49,726 households, and 34,112 families residing in the county. The population density was 315 people per square mile (111/km2). There were 52,972 housing units at an average density of 116 per square mile (45/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 89.71% White or Caucasian, 7.77% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.80% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race, 32.1% identified as being of German ancestry, 21.4% American, 8.8% Irish, and 8.4% English ancestry.

There were 49,726 households, out of which 31.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.00% were married couples living together, 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.40% were non-families. 26.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.40% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 104.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.00 males.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 147,430 people, 55,687 households, and 37,506 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 322.1 inhabitants per square mile (124.4 /km2). There were 60,814 housing units at an average density of 132.8 per square mile (51.3 /km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 85.1% white, 9.6% black or African American, 1.4% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 1.1% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 3.5% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 31.7% were German, 14.1% were Irish, 9.8% were English, 8.5% were American, and 5.1% were Italian.[13]

Of the 55,687 households, 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.6% were non-families, and 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.01. The median age was 39.7 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $52,994 and the median income for a family was $65,811. Males had a median income of $47,622 versus $34,225 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,588. About 7.7% of families and 10.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.1% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Communities[]

Hagerstown

Williamsport

City[]

Towns[]

Census-designated places[]

The Census Bureau recognizes the following census-designated places in the county:

  • Antietam
  • Bagtown
  • Bakersville
  • Beaver Creek
  • Big Pool
  • Big Spring
  • Breathedsville
  • Brownsville
  • Cavetown
  • Cearfoss
  • Charlton
  • Chewsville
  • Dargan
  • Downsville
  • Eakles Mill
  • Edgemont
  • Ernstville
  • Fairplay
  • Fairview
  • Fort Ritchie
  • Fountainhead-Orchard Hills
  • Gapland
  • Garretts Mill
  • Greensburg
  • Halfway
  • Highfield-Cascade
  • Indian Springs
  • Jugtown
  • Kemps Mill
  • Leitersburg
  • Mapleville
  • Maugansville
  • Mercersville
  • Middleburg
  • Mount Aetna
  • Mount Briar
  • Mount Lena
  • Paramount-Long Meadow
  • Pecktonville
  • Pinesburg
  • Pondsville
  • Reid
  • Ringgold
  • Robinwood
  • Rohrersville
  • Saint James
  • San Mar
  • Sandy Hook
  • Tilghmanton
  • Trego-Rohrersville Station
  • Wilson-Conococheague
  • Yarrowsburg

Hancock

Unincorporated communities[]

Sharpsburg

  • Appletown
  • Benevola
  • Broadfording
  • Burtner
  • Cedar Grove
  • Huyett
  • Pen Mar
  • Samples Manor
  • Spielman
  • Trego
  • Van Lear
  • Weverton
  • Woodmont
  • Zittlestown

Politics and government[]

Federal representation[]

The county is located within Maryland's 6th congressional district. The representative of the district currently is David Trone (D).

Like most of Appalachia, German-influenced and Unionist Western Maryland,[15] Washington County is solidly Republican. The last Democrat to carry Washington County at a Presidential level was Lyndon Johnson during his 1964 landslide win over Barry Goldwater, although between 1888 and 1940 the county was a consistent bellwether for all Presidential elections.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment of Washington County[16]
Party Total Percentage
Template:Party color cell Democratic 32,592 33.21%
Template:Party color cell Republican 43,576 44.41%
Template:Party color cell Independents, unaffiliated, and other 21,957 22.38%
Total 98,125 100.00%
United States presidential election results for Washington County, Maryland[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 40,224 59.35% 26,044 38.42% 1,511 2.23%
2016 40,998 62.13% 21,129 32.02% 3,864 5.86%
2012 36,074 57.48% 25,042 39.90% 1,639 2.61%
2008 34,169 55.47% 26,245 42.61% 1,186 1.93%
2004 36,917 63.76% 20,387 35.21% 600 1.04%
2000 27,948 58.88% 18,221 38.38% 1,301 2.74%
1996 21,434 50.86% 16,481 39.11% 4,227 10.03%
1992 21,977 47.56% 16,495 35.70% 7,736 16.74%
1988 25,912 63.76% 14,408 35.45% 318 0.78%
1984 27,118 66.68% 13,329 32.78% 219 0.54%
1980 22,901 58.60% 14,118 36.12% 2,064 5.28%
1976 20,194 55.95% 15,902 44.05% 0 0.00%
1972 24,234 69.27% 10,039 28.70% 712 2.04%
1968 16,050 47.13% 11,266 33.08% 6,737 19.78%
1964 12,756 39.11% 19,858 60.89% 0 0.00%
1960 17,828 53.28% 15,632 46.72% 0 0.00%
1956 19,455 62.72% 11,562 37.28% 0 0.00%
1952 17,653 58.08% 12,657 41.64% 84 0.28%
1948 11,887 52.53% 10,588 46.79% 155 0.68%
1944 12,227 51.83% 11,365 48.17% 0 0.00%
1940 11,054 43.76% 14,125 55.91% 83 0.33%
1936 10,619 42.96% 14,050 56.84% 49 0.20%
1932 8,929 43.50% 11,370 55.39% 228 1.11%
1928 12,404 67.78% 5,816 31.78% 81 0.44%
1924 7,460 54.21% 4,620 33.57% 1,682 12.22%
1920 8,757 54.75% 6,852 42.84% 386 2.41%
1916 5,093 45.88% 5,642 50.83% 365 3.29%
1912 1,907 19.99% 4,589 48.10% 3,044 31.91%
1908 4,650 49.59% 4,518 48.18% 209 2.23%
1904 4,581 51.86% 4,064 46.01% 188 2.13%
1900 5,475 52.05% 4,862 46.22% 182 1.73%
1896 5,428 53.57% 4,382 43.24% 323 3.19%
1892 4,373 47.16% 4,667 50.33% 233 2.51%



State representation[]

Washington County is represented by two senators in the Maryland State Senate. Member George C. Edwards (R), serves the 1st district in Maryland and Andrew A. Serafini (R), serves in the 2nd district. The county also is represented in Maryland General Assembly’s other primary division, the Maryland House of Delegates. Delegates who stand for Washington County include: Mike McKay (R) for District 1C, Neil Parrot (R) and William Wivell (R) for District 2A and Paul Cordermen (R) for District 2B.[18]

County government[]

Washington County’s “leader” is known as the County Administrator. Currently, Kirk C. Downey serves as the Interim Administrator. However, Washington County's County Commissioners exercise executive powers as they exist in the government of the county.

The County Commissioners in Washington County comprise the traditional form of county government in Maryland. Current members include: Terry Baker (Vice President), Randall Wagner, Cort Meinelschmidt, Jeffrey A. Cline (President), and Wayne K. Keefer.[19]

Boonsboro

Economy[]

In 2000, the median income for a household in the county was $40,617, and the median income for a family was $48,962. Males had a median income of $34,917 versus $24,524 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,062. About 7.00% of families and 9.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.30% of those under age 18 and 9.50% of those age 65 or over.

According to the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, the following were the major employers in the county (excluding post offices, state government, and local governments, but including public institutions of higher education):[20]

Employer Employees
(Nov. 2014)[20]
Meritus Health 2,730
Citi 2,700
First Data 2,322
Volvo Group 1,350
The Bowman Group 718
FedEx Ground 648
Staples Inc. 597
Hagerstown Community College 594
Merkle Response Management Group 545
Arc of Washington County 500
Direct Mail Processors 500
Walmart/Sam's Club 500
Sierra Nevada Corp. 486
Giant Food Stores/
Martin's Food Markets
420
Weis Markets 400
Brook Lane Health Services 395
Lehigh Phoenix 360
A.C.&T 350
Susquehanna Bancshares 345
Dot Foods 312
JLG Industries 300
Home Depot 296
Lowe's 276
Thompson's Gas & Electric Service 275
United Parcel Service (UPS) 274
CertainTeed 250
Darden Restaurants 250
Sheetz 250
Tractor Supply 250
Homewood Retirement Centers 249
NMS Healthcare of Hagerstown 240
Horizon Goodwill Industries 229
C. William Hetzer 225
FedEx Freight 225

Parks and recreation[]

Sideling Hill man-made mountain pass on I-68/U.S. 40 near Hancock

National parks[]

  • Antietam National Battlefield
  • Appalachian National Scenic Trail
  • Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
  • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

State parks[]

  • Fort Frederick State Park
  • Fort Tonoloway State Park
  • Gathland State Park
  • Greenbrier State Park
  • South Mountain State Park
  • Washington Monument State Park

Museums, historic sites, and other points of interest[]

  • Bowman House, Boonsboro
  • Crystal Grottoes, the only show caves in Maryland.
  • Discovery Station, Hagerstown
  • Hager House, Hagerstown
  • Hagerstown Roundhouse Museum, Hagerstown
  • Price-Miller House, Hagerstown
  • Sideling Hill, man-made mountain pass on Interstate 68/U.S. Route 40 roughly 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Hancock shows off 100 million years+ of rock formation with Information Center and walkways on the premises.
  • Springfield Farm, Williamsport
  • Stoney Creek Farm, Boonsboro
  • Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown
  • Washington County Rural Heritage Museum, Boonsboro

Education[]

Washington County Public Schools administers public schools in the county. See Washington County Public Schools – School Directory for a detailed listing of elementary, middle, high, and other schools.

High schools[]

Public high schools

  • Antietam Academy, Hagerstown
  • Barbara Ingram School for the Arts, Hagerstown
  • Boonsboro High School, Boonsboro
  • Clear Spring High School, Clear Spring
  • Evening High School, Hagerstown
  • Hancock High School, Hancock
  • North Hagerstown High School, Hagerstown
  • Smithsburg High School, Smithsburg
  • South Hagerstown High School, Hagerstown
  • Washington County Technical High School, Hagerstown
  • Williamsport High School, Williamsport

Private high schools

  • Broadfording Academy, Hagerstown
  • Emmanuel Christian School, Hagerstown
  • Gateway Academy, Williamsport
  • Grace Academy, Hagerstown
  • Heritage Academy, Hagerstown
  • Highland View Academy, Hagerstown
  • St. James School, Saint James
  • St. Maria Goretti High School, Hagerstown
  • Truth Christian Academy, Hagerstown

Colleges and universities[]

  • Antietam Bible College, Biblical Seminary, and Graduate School
  • Hagerstown Community College, two-year public community college
  • Kaplan College (formerly Hagerstown Business College)
  • Mount Saint Mary's University, Hagerstown Campus, offers Master of Business Administration (MBA) program.
  • University System of Maryland at Hagerstown, branch of the University System of Maryland; offers various associate's, bachelor's, and master's degree programs in connection with other state colleges and universities in Maryland.

Notable residents and natives[]

  • See People from Washington County.

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Washington County, Maryland
  • Washington County Closed-Circuit Educational Television Project
  • William M. Brish, a leader of closed circuit instructional television in public school elementary classrooms.

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/24/24043.html. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ "Counties in Appalachia - Appalachian Regional Commission". http://www.arc.gov/counties. 
  4. ^ [1], Washington County, Maryland History and Genealogy, 2006. Retrieved 2008.
  5. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-24. http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov/natreg/docs/All_Data.html. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_24.txt. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/md190090.txt. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US24043. 
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US24043. 
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US24043. 
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US24043. 
  15. ^ Levine, Mark V.; ‘Standing Political Decisions and Critical Realignment: The Pattern of Maryland Politics, 1872-1948’; The Journal of Politics, volume 38, no. 2 (May, 1976), pp. 292-325
  16. ^ "Summary of Voter Activity Report". Maryland State Board of Elections. August 2020. https://elections.maryland.gov/pdf/vrar/2020_08.pdf. 
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  18. ^ http://dls.state.md.us/data/libandinfser/libandinfser_docandpub/RosterByCounty.pdf
  19. ^ "County Commissioners". https://www.washco-md.net/index.php/county-commissioners/. 
  20. ^ a b Major Employers in Washington County, Maryland, Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (Nov. 2014 data).

External links[]

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Coordinates: 39°36′N 77°49′W / 39.60, -77.81

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Washington County, Maryland. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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