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Windsor County, Vermont
Woodstock Court House.jpg
Windsor County courthouse in Woodstock
Map of Vermont highlighting Windsor County
Location in the state of Vermont
Map of the U.S. highlighting Vermont
Vermont's location in the U.S.
Founded 1781
Named for Windsor, Vermont, which was named for Windsor, Connecticut
Shire Town Woodstock
Largest town Hartford
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

977 sq mi (2,530 km²)
969 sq mi (2,510 km²)
7.4 sq mi (19 km²), 0.8%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

57,753
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website http://www.swcrpc.org/

Windsor County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont. As of the 2020 census, the population was 57,753.[1] The shire town (county seat) is the town of Woodstock.[2] The county's largest municipality is the town of Hartford.

History[]

Windsor County is one of several Vermont counties created from land ceded by the State of New York on 15 January 1777 when Vermont declared itself to be a distinct state from New York.[3][4][5] The land originally was contested by Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Netherland, but it remained undelineated until July 20, 1764, when King George III established the boundary between Province of New Hampshire and Province of New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts and south of the parallel of 45 degrees north latitude. New York assigned the land gained to Albany County.[6][7] On March 12, 1772, Albany County was partitioned to create Charlotte County,[8] and this situation remained until Vermont's independence from New York and Britain.

Windsor County was established on February 16, 1781, from parts of Cumberland County and organized the same year.[9]

Windsor County is notable for being the birthplace (1805) of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. Calvin Coolidge, the 30th U.S. president, was also born in Windsor County.

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 977 square miles (2,530 km2), of which 969 square miles (2,510 km2) is land and 7.4 square miles (19 km2) (0.8%) is water.[10] It is the largest county by area in Vermont.

Adjacent counties[]

National parks[]

  • Green Mountain National Forest (part)
  • Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park
  • White Rocks National Recreation Area (part)

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 15,740
1800 26,944 71.2%
1810 34,877 29.4%
1820 38,233 9.6%
1830 40,625 6.3%
1840 40,356 −0.7%
1850 38,504 −4.6%
1860 37,193 −3.4%
1870 36,063 −3.0%
1880 35,196 −2.4%
1890 31,706 −9.9%
1900 32,225 1.6%
1910 33,681 4.5%
1920 36,984 9.8%
1930 37,416 1.2%
1940 37,862 1.2%
1950 40,885 8.0%
1960 42,483 3.9%
1970 44,082 3.8%
1980 51,030 15.8%
1990 54,055 5.9%
2000 57,418 6.2%
2010 56,670 −1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
1790–1960[12] 1900–1990[13]
1990–2000[14] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census[]

As of the 2000 census,[15] there were 57,418 people, 24,162 households, and 15,729 families living in the county. The population density was 59 people per square mile (23/km2). There were 31,621 housing units at an average density of 33 per square mile (13/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.72% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.63% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. 0.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 20.1% were of English, 12.9% Irish, 10.9% American, 9.9% French, 7.7% German, 6.7% French Canadian and 5.5% Italian ancestry. 96.4% spoke English and 1.5% French as their first language.

There were 24,162 households, out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.70% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.90% were non-families. 28.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.86. In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.30% under the age of 18, 5.90% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 27.60% from 45 to 64, and 15.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,688, and the median income for a family was $59,002. Males had a median income of $42,648 versus $25,696 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,369. About 3.20% of families and 5.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.50% of those under age 18 and 7.60% of those age 65 or over.

In 2007, the census department estimated that Windsor had the oldest average age in the state, 44.7. This compares with the actual census in 2000 of 41.3 years.[16]

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 56,670 people, 24,753 households, and 15,420 families living in the county.[17] The population density was 58.5 inhabitants per square mile (22.6 /km2). There were 34,118 housing units at an average density of 35.2 per square mile (13.6 /km2).[18] The racial makeup of the county was 96.3% white, 0.9% Asian, 0.6% black or African American, 0.3% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.2% of the population.[17]

Of the 24,753 households, 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.7% were non-families, and 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.77. The median age was 45.8 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $50,893 and the median income for a family was $63,387. Males had a median income of $44,610 versus $34,150 for females. The per capita income for the county was $29,053. About 5.6% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.[19]

Politics[]

Since Vermont began using the popular vote in presidential elections in 1828, Windsor County has voted for the statewide winner in every presidential election in the state's history with the exception of 1912 when it voted for Progressive candidate Theodore Roosevelt over statewide winner William Taft. Mirroring the politics of the state as a whole, Windsor County was solidly Republican from its inception in the 1856 election until the 1980s, voting only for Democrat Lyndon Johnson in 1964 when he faced the highly conservative Barry Goldwater. It has supported the Democratic presidential candidate in every election since 1992. While the county did not swing as hard to the Democrats as other parts of Vermont, it has given the Democrats at least 60 percent of the vote at every election since 2004.

United States presidential election results for Windsor County, Vermont[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 9,971 28.95% 23,376 67.86% 1,099 3.19%
2016 8,605 28.75% 17,556 58.66% 3,767 12.59%
2012 8,598 29.96% 19,494 67.93% 607 2.12%
2008 9,084 29.15% 21,444 68.81% 637 2.04%
2004 11,491 37.35% 18,561 60.33% 715 2.32%
2000 11,713 40.19% 15,140 51.94% 2,294 7.87%
1996 8,015 30.80% 14,070 54.07% 3,938 15.13%
1992 9,035 30.95% 13,871 47.52% 6,286 21.53%
1988 12,584 50.48% 12,009 48.17% 337 1.35%
1984 14,054 57.96% 9,869 40.70% 324 1.34%
1980 10,470 45.71% 8,067 35.22% 4,366 19.06%
1976 11,001 55.80% 8,282 42.01% 433 2.20%
1972 12,421 63.59% 6,989 35.78% 122 0.62%
1968 9,795 56.47% 6,986 40.27% 566 3.26%
1964 5,859 32.51% 12,163 67.49% 1 0.01%
1960 12,657 66.94% 6,250 33.05% 2 0.01%
1956 14,157 78.73% 3,820 21.24% 5 0.03%
1952 13,941 78.46% 3,791 21.33% 37 0.21%
1948 9,626 70.95% 3,736 27.54% 206 1.52%
1944 9,930 66.12% 5,089 33.88% 0 0.00%
1940 9,109 62.34% 5,475 37.47% 28 0.19%
1936 9,489 64.90% 5,084 34.77% 49 0.34%
1932 9,353 67.16% 4,343 31.18% 231 1.66%
1928 10,739 79.46% 2,747 20.33% 29 0.21%
1924 10,223 88.43% 1,015 8.78% 322 2.79%
1920 8,400 82.56% 1,714 16.85% 61 0.60%
1916 4,236 64.54% 2,216 33.77% 111 1.69%
1912 2,409 37.48% 1,302 20.26% 2,716 42.26%
1908 4,683 81.61% 907 15.81% 148 2.58%
1904 4,830 83.74% 797 13.82% 141 2.44%
1900 5,227 84.25% 943 15.20% 34 0.55%
1896 6,128 88.02% 674 9.68% 160 2.30%
1892 4,753 76.79% 1,329 21.47% 108 1.74%
1888 5,163 75.48% 1,457 21.30% 220 3.22%
1884 5,110 74.23% 1,601 23.26% 173 2.51%
1880 6,122 77.29% 1,740 21.97% 59 0.74%



Transportation[]

In 2009, the United States Department of Transportation measured 113.6 miles (182.8 km) of "major arteries", the highest in the state.[21]

Because US Route 4 had the "feel" of a freeway, motorists were inclined to speed. As a result, the Windsor County Sheriff's Department wrote 2,452 tickets in 2007.[22]

Communities[]

Towns[]

Villages[]

Villages are census divisions, but have no separate corporate existence from the surrounding towns.

  • Ludlow
  • Perkinsville
  • Woodstock

Census-designated places[]

  • Ascutney
  • Bethel
  • Cavendish
  • Chester
  • Hartford Village
  • Hartland
  • North Hartland
  • North Springfield
  • Norwich
  • Proctorsville
  • Quechee
  • Rochester
  • South Royalton
  • South Woodstock
  • Springfield
  • West Woodstock
  • Weston
  • White River Junction
  • Wilder
  • Windsor


Unincorporated communities[]

  • Brownsville
  • Felchville
  • Gaysville
  • Hartland Four Corners
  • Lewiston
  • North Pomfret
  • Plymouth Notch
  • Weathersfield Bow
  • West Hartford

See also[]

  • List of counties in Vermont
  • List of towns in Vermont
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Windsor County, Vermont
  • USS Windsor (APA-55), an attack transport named for Windsor County

References[]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/windsorcountyvermont/POP010220. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  3. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. P. 70-73.
  4. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 64.
  5. ^ Williamson, Chilton. Vermont in Quandary: 1763-1825. Growth of Vermont series, Number 4. Montpelier: Vermont Historical Series, 1949. PP. 82-84; map facing 95, 100-102, 112-113.
  6. ^ Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. pp.13-19.
  7. ^ Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 63.
  8. ^ New York Colonial Laws, Chapter 1534; Section 5; Paragraph 321)
  9. ^ "Vermont: Individual County Chronologies". The Newberry Library. 2008. http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/VT_Individual_County_Chronologies.htm. 
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. http://www2.census.gov/geo/docs/maps-data/data/gazetteer/counties_list_50.txt. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  13. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/vt190090.txt. 
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  16. ^ Sutkowski, Matt (August 7, 2008). Census: State older, a little more diverse. Burlington Free Press. 
  17. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US50027. 
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US50027. 
  19. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US50027. 
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  21. ^ Heath, Brad; McLean, Dan (September 25, 2009). "Funds bypass worst roads". Burlington Free Press: pp. 1A. 
  22. ^ Shinn, Peggy (January 18, 2009). "Not so fast (or else) on these Vermont highways". Boston Globe. http://archive.boston.com/travel/explorene/vermont/articles/2009/01/18/not_so_fast_or_else_on_these_vermont_highways/. 

External links[]

Coordinates: 43°34′N 72°34′W / 43.57, -72.57


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Windsor County, Vermont. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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