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Wyandot County, Ohio
Wyandot County Ohio Courthouse.JPG
Wyandot County Courthouse in Upper Sandusky
Seal of Wyandot County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Wyandot County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded February 3, 1845[1]
Named for the Wyandot people
Seat Upper Sandusky
Largest city Upper Sandusky
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

408 sq mi (1,057 km²)
407 sq mi (1,054 km²)
0.7 sq mi (2 km²), 0.2%
Population
 - (2020)
 - Density

21,900
auto/sq mi (Expression error: Unrecognized word "auto"./km²)
Congressional district 5th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.co.wyandot.oh.us

Wyandot County is a county located in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 21,900.[2] Its county seat is Upper Sandusky.[3] It was named for the Wyandot Indians, who lived here before and after European encounter. Their autonym is variously translated from their language as "around the plains" and "dwellers on the peninsula".[4]

The county was organized by the state legislature from parts of Crawford, Marion, Hardin and Hancock counties on February 3, 1845.

History[]

Geography[]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 408 square miles (1,060 km2), of which 407 square miles (1,050 km2) is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2) (0.2%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[]

Demographics[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 11,194
1860 15,596 39.3%
1870 18,553 19.0%
1880 22,395 20.7%
1890 21,722 −3.0%
1900 21,125 −2.7%
1910 20,760 −1.7%
1920 19,481 −6.2%
1930 19,036 −2.3%
1940 19,218 1.0%
1950 19,785 3.0%
1960 21,648 9.4%
1970 21,826 0.8%
1980 22,651 3.8%
1990 22,254 −1.8%
2000 22,908 2.9%
2010 22,615 −1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2020 [10]

2000 census[]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 22,908 people, 8,882 households, and 6,270 families living in the county. The population density was 56 people per square mile (22/km2). There were 9,324 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.91% White, 0.14% Black or African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.74% from other races, and 0.62% from two or more races. 1.46% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 45.6% were of German, 19.5% American, 7.0% English and 6.9% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 8,882 households, out of which 33.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.90% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.40% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.80% under the age of 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 27.90% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 15.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,839, and the median income for a family was $45,173. Males had a median income of $31,716 versus $22,395 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,170. About 3.80% of families and 5.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.20% of those under age 18 and 5.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 22,615 people, 9,091 households, and 6,236 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 55.6 inhabitants per square mile (21.5 /km2). There were 9,870 housing units at an average density of 24.3 per square mile (9.4 /km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 96.9% white, 0.6% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 1.1% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.2% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 43.3% were German, 11.8% were American, 11.2% were Irish, and 8.6% were English.[14]

Of the 9,091 households, 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.4% were non-families, and 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age was 40.5 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,216 and the median income for a family was $57,461. Males had a median income of $40,320 versus $30,027 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,553. About 4.6% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.0% of those under age 18 and 8.2% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Politics[]

From 1856 to 1916, Wyandot County was consistently Democratic, voting for the party's candidates in every presidential election in that span. Since 1916, it has become a strongly Republican county, voting for Republican presidential candidates in all but three elections that were national landslides for the Democratic Party, & none since 1964.

United States presidential election results for Wyandot County, Ohio[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 8,462 74.21% 2,733 23.97% 208 1.82%
2016 7,468 70.20% 2,515 23.64% 655 6.16%
2012 6,180 58.29% 4,137 39.02% 285 2.69%
2008 6,270 56.99% 4,461 40.55% 271 2.46%
2004 7,254 65.69% 3,708 33.58% 81 0.73%
2000 6,113 62.21% 3,397 34.57% 317 3.23%
1996 4,473 46.56% 3,677 38.27% 1,457 15.17%
1992 4,411 42.24% 3,031 29.02% 3,001 28.74%
1988 6,178 66.87% 2,936 31.78% 125 1.35%
1984 7,204 74.81% 2,342 24.32% 84 0.87%
1980 5,786 63.06% 2,757 30.05% 632 6.89%
1976 5,661 56.92% 4,043 40.65% 242 2.43%
1972 6,414 68.15% 2,771 29.44% 227 2.41%
1968 5,265 57.90% 2,919 32.10% 910 10.01%
1964 4,139 43.98% 5,273 56.02% 0 0.00%
1960 6,786 65.81% 3,526 34.19% 0 0.00%
1956 6,807 73.18% 2,495 26.82% 0 0.00%
1952 7,015 71.64% 2,777 28.36% 0 0.00%
1948 4,849 59.26% 3,308 40.43% 25 0.31%
1944 6,144 65.54% 3,231 34.46% 0 0.00%
1940 6,272 59.86% 4,206 40.14% 0 0.00%
1936 4,260 41.42% 5,597 54.41% 429 4.17%
1932 3,939 41.42% 5,451 57.32% 119 1.25%
1928 5,790 65.41% 3,024 34.16% 38 0.43%
1924 3,973 50.86% 3,271 41.88% 567 7.26%
1920 4,560 50.50% 4,443 49.21% 26 0.29%
1916 2,078 38.68% 3,250 60.50% 44 0.82%
1912 1,409 26.94% 2,848 54.46% 973 18.60%
1908 2,408 41.36% 3,353 57.59% 61 1.05%
1904 2,603 47.90% 2,697 49.63% 134 2.47%
1900 2,397 41.68% 3,268 56.82% 86 1.50%
1896 2,374 40.44% 3,441 58.62% 55 0.94%
1892 2,057 40.25% 2,857 55.90% 197 3.85%
1888 2,256 41.64% 2,981 55.02% 181 3.34%
1884 2,380 43.05% 3,074 55.60% 75 1.36%
1880 2,398 44.46% 2,981 55.27% 15 0.28%
1876 2,079 44.22% 2,619 55.71% 3 0.06%
1872 1,816 46.13% 2,095 53.21% 26 0.66%
1868 1,734 44.19% 2,190 55.81% 0 0.00%
1864 1,730 47.94% 1,879 52.06% 0 0.00%
1860 1,567 47.72% 1,670 50.85% 47 1.43%
1856 1,247 47.36% 1,278 48.54% 108 4.10%



Government[]

Wyandot County is represented in the Ohio General Assembly by State Representative Riordan McClain (House District 87) and State Senator Dave Burke (Senate District 26). McClain represents the 87th Ohio House district, which also includes all of Crawford and Morrow counties as well as parts of northern Marion County and southwestern Seneca County. McClain was elected to his first full term in November 2018 after having been appointed to the seat in January 2018. Burke represents the 26th Ohio Senate district, which includes parts or all of 7 counties currently, having been appointed to the seat in July 2011.

Wyandot County has three county commissioners who oversee the various county departments. Current commissioners are: Ron Metzger, Steven Seitz and Bill Clinger.[17]

Communities[]

Map of Wyandot County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

City[]

  • Upper Sandusky (county seat)

Towns and villages[]

  • Carey
  • Forest
  • Harpster
  • Kirby
  • Marseilles
  • Nevada
  • Sycamore
  • Wharton

Townships[]

  • Antrim
  • Crane
  • Crawford
  • Eden
  • Jackson
  • Marseilles
  • Mifflin
  • Pitt
  • Richland
  • Ridge
  • Salem
  • Sycamore
  • Tymochtee

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated place[]

  • McCutchenville

Unincorporated communities[]

  • Belle Vernon
  • Brownstown
  • Crawford
  • Deunquat
  • Edenville
  • Little Sandusky
  • Lovell
  • Mexico
  • Seal
  • Smithville
  • Tymochtee
  • Wyandot

Notable people[]

  • Darius D. Hare, born near Adrian, United States Congressman from Ohio[18]
  • John Stewart, Methodist missionary

Notable places, activities, and events[]

The largest solar energy farm in Ohio covers 80 acres (320,000 m2) adjacent to the Wyandot County Airport. It has 159,000 ground-mounted solar panels, and can produce 12 megawatts. It was inaugurated on 19 August 2010, with Governor Ted Strickland.[19][20] It was developed by PSEG Energy.[21]

See also[]

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Wyandot County, Ohio

References[]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Wyandot County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Wyandot.pdf. 
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  4. ^ "Wyandot County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39175&sid=0. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/docs/gazetteer/counties_list_39.txt. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/oh190090.txt. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  10. ^ 2020 census
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_DP/DPDP1/0500000US39175. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/GCTPH1.CY07/0500000US39175. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP02/0500000US39175. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_5YR/DP03/0500000US39175. 
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS. 
  17. ^ "Elected Officials". Wyandot County Courthouse Web Portal. http://www.co.wyandot.oh.us/electedof.php. 
  18. ^ Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963. 
  19. ^ Ohio's Largest Solar Farm, solardaily.com, 24 August 2010, accessed 2 September 2010
  20. ^ Officials hail big solar farm Script error: No such module "webarchive"., Jim Maurer, "The Courier" (Findlay, Ohio), 20 August 2010, accessed 2 September 2010
  21. ^ PSEG Wyandot, PSEG.com, accessed 2 September 2010

External links[]

Coordinates: 40°51′N 83°18′W / 40.85, -83.30

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