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Yolo County, California
—  County  —
County of Yolo

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[[File:Template:Maplink|250px|none|alt=|Interactive map of Yolo County]]Interactive map of Yolo County
Location in the state of California
Country United States
State California
Region Sacramento Valley
CSA Greater Sacramento
Incorporated February 18, 1850[1]
County seat Woodland
Largest city Davis (population)
West Sacramento (area)
Area
 • Total 1,024 sq mi (2,650 km2)
 • Land 1,015 sq mi (2,630 km2)
 • Water 8.9 sq mi (23 km2)
Highest elevation[2] 3,123 ft (952 m)
Time zone Pacific Time Zone (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-7)
Area codes 530, 916, 279
FIPS code 06-113
GNIS feature ID 277321
Website yolocounty.org

Yolo County (Wintun: Yo-loy), officially the County of Yolo, is a county located in the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 216,403.[3] Its county seat is Woodland.[4]

Yolo County is included in the Greater Sacramento metropolitan area and is located in the Sacramento Valley.

The majority of Yolo County remains a relatively rural agricultural region.

Etymology[]

In the original act of 1850 the name was spelled "Yola." Yolo is a Patwin Native American name variously believed to be a corruption of a tribal name Yo-loy meaning "a place abounding in rushes", the village of Yodoi, believed to be in the vicinity of Knights Landing, California, or the name of the chief of said village, Yodo.[5][6]

History[]

Yolo County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood.

Government[]

The county is governed by a board of five district supervisors as well as the governments of its four incorporated cities: Davis, West Sacramento, Winters, and Woodland.

Geography[]

Aerial view of Watts Woodland Airport and surrounding area

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,024 square miles (2,650 km2), of which 1,015 square miles (2,630 km2) is land and 8.9 square miles (23 km2) (0.9%) is water.[7][8]

Adjacent counties[]

Transportation[]

Major highways[]

  • I-5
  • I-80
  • I-80 Bus.
  • I-505
  • [[|]]
  • [[|]]
  • [[|]]
  • [[|]]
  • [[|]]

County roads[]

Addressing in Yolo County is based on a system of numbered county roads. The numbering system works in the following way:

  1. North–South roads have numbers from 41 to 117 and increase from west to east.
  2. East–West roads have numbers from 1 to 38A, and then from 151 to 161, and increase from north to south.

Each integer road number is generally one mile (1.6 km) apart, with letters occasionally designating roads less than one mile (1.6 km) apart. County roads entering urban areas generally become named roads once they cross a city boundary. Some examples include County Road 101 in Woodland being renamed Pioneer Ave. and County Road 102 (also known as County Route E8) in Davis being named Pole Line Road.

Public transportation[]

  • Yolobus (Yolo County Transportation District) runs buses throughout Yolo County and into Sacramento, and Sacramento International Airport.[9]
  • The University of California, Davis and the city of Davis jointly run Unitrans, a combination local city bus and campus shuttle.[10]
  • Fairfield-Suisun Transit Line 30 also stops in Davis on its runs between Fairfield (Solano County) and Sacramento.
  • Amtrak has a station in Davis.

Airports[]

  • Yolo County Airport
  • University Airport
  • Borges-Clarksburg Airport
  • Watts-Woodland Airport

Port[]

The Port of Sacramento, now known as the Port of West Sacramento, is an inland port in West Sacramento, California, in the Sacramento metropolitan area. It is 79 nautical miles (146 km) northeast of San Francisco, and is centered in the California Central Valley, one of the richest agricultural regions in the world.

Crime[]

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates[]

Politics[]

Yolo is a strongly Democratic county in presidential and congressional elections. The last Republican presidential candidate to win a majority in the county was Dwight Eisenhower in 1952, which is the longest Republican drought for any California county. In fact, since 1932, Eisenhower's win in 1952 was the only time the county was carried by the Republican presidential nominee.

United States presidential election results for Yolo County, California[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 27,292 28.05% 67,598 69.48% 2,404 2.47%
2016 20,739 25.26% 54,752 66.70% 6,599 8.04%
2012 23,368 31.29% 48,715 65.24% 2,588 3.47%
2008 24,592 30.84% 53,488 67.07% 1,669 2.09%
2004 28,005 38.75% 42,885 59.34% 1,379 1.91%
2000 23,057 37.53% 33,747 54.93% 4,632 7.54%
1996 18,807 32.38% 33,033 56.88% 6,239 10.74%
1992 17,574 28.15% 33,297 53.33% 11,565 18.52%
1988 22,358 41.89% 30,429 57.01% 585 1.10%
1984 24,329 47.84% 25,879 50.89% 645 1.27%
1980 19,603 39.45% 21,527 43.32% 8,560 17.23%
1976 18,376 42.42% 23,533 54.33% 1,408 3.25%
1972 17,969 42.04% 23,694 55.44% 1,075 2.52%
1968 11,123 38.41% 15,833 54.67% 2,004 6.92%
1964 7,976 30.36% 18,266 69.52% 32 0.12%
1960 10,104 44.73% 12,395 54.87% 90 0.40%
1956 9,347 47.99% 10,075 51.72% 57 0.29%
1952 9,375 53.17% 8,119 46.04% 139 0.79%
1948 5,560 43.83% 6,655 52.47% 469 3.70%
1944 4,233 41.84% 5,837 57.70% 46 0.45%
1940 4,373 40.29% 6,380 58.78% 101 0.93%
1936 2,594 29.84% 5,992 68.94% 106 1.22%
1932 2,515 29.49% 5,780 67.77% 234 2.74%
1928 3,545 56.96% 2,641 42.43% 38 0.61%
1924 2,470 45.35% 797 14.63% 2,180 40.02%
1920 3,375 61.95% 1,787 32.80% 286 5.25%
1916 2,334 42.43% 2,922 53.12% 245 4.45%
1912 1,332 33.35% 2,239 56.06% 423 10.59%
1908 1,707 49.01% 1,553 44.59% 223 6.40%
1904 1,702 51.87% 1,301 39.65% 278 8.47%
1900 1,510 45.81% 1,687 51.18% 99 3.00%
1896 1,485 44.84% 1,753 52.93% 74 2.23%
1892 1,372 40.78% 1,707 50.74% 285 8.47%
1888 1,350 44.66% 1,580 52.27% 93 3.08%
1884 1,412 48.74% 1,421 49.05% 64 2.21%
1880 1,256 47.38% 1,374 51.83% 21 0.79%



Yolo County has been somewhat more likely to elect Republican governors since then (Ronald Reagan carried the county in 1966, George Deukmejian in 1986, and Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2003 and 2006).

In the United States House of Representatives, Yolo County is split between California's 3rd and 6th congressional districts,[15] represented by John Garamendi (DWalnut Grove)[16] and Doris Matsui (DSacramento),[17] respectively.

In the California State Senate, the county is split between the 3rd and 6th Senate districts,[18] represented by Lois Wolk and Richard Pan, respectively.

In the California State Assembly, the county is split between the 4th and 7th Assembly districts,[19] represented by Bill Dodd and Kevin McCarty, respectively.

In June 1978, Yolo was one of only three counties in the entire state to reject Proposition 13 (the others being San Francisco and Kern).

In November 2008, Yolo was one of just three counties in California's interior in which voters rejected Proposition 8 to ban gay marriage. Yolo voters rejected Proposition 8 by a vote of 58.65 percent to 41.35 percent. The other interior counties in which Proposition 8 failed to receive a majority of votes were Alpine County and Mono County.[20]

Cities by population and voter registration[]

Demographics[]

2011[]

Places by population, race, and income[]

2010[]

The 2010 United States Census reported that Yolo County had a population of 200,849. The ethnic makeup of Yolo County was 126,883 (63.2%) White, 5,208 (2.6%) African American, 2,214 (1.1%) Native American, 26,052 (13.0%) Asian, 910 (0.5%) Pacific Islander, 27,882 (13.9%) from other races, and 11,700 (5.8%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 60,953 persons (30.3%).[28]

2000[]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 1,086
1860 4,716 334.3%
1870 9,899 109.9%
1880 11,772 18.9%
1890 12,684 7.7%
1900 13,618 7.4%
1910 13,926 2.3%
1920 17,105 22.8%
1930 23,644 38.2%
1940 27,243 15.2%
1950 40,640 49.2%
1960 65,727 61.7%
1970 91,788 39.7%
1980 113,374 23.5%
1990 141,092 24.4%
2000 168,660 19.5%
2010 200,849 19.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[29]
1790-1960[30] 1900-1990[31]
1990-2000[32] 2010–2020[33]

As of the census[34] of 2000, there were 168,660 people, 59,375 households, and 37,465 families residing in the county. The population density was 166 people per square mile (64/km2). There were 61,587 housing units at an average density of 61 per square mile (23/km2). The ethnic makeup of the county was 67.7% White, 2.0% Black or African American, 1.2% Native American, 9.9% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 13.8% from other races, and 5.2% from two or more races. 25.9% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 10.0% were of German, 6.6% English and 6.4% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 68.5% spoke English, 19.5% Spanish, 2.1% Chinese or Mandarin and 1.8% Russian as their first language.

There were 59,375 households, out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.6% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.9% were non-families. 23.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.2% under the age of 18, 18.3% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 18.9% from 45 to 64, and 9.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.2 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,769, and the median income for a family was $51,623. Males had a median income of $38,022 versus $30,687 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,365. About 9.5% of families and 18.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[]

Public schools[]

The county's public schools are managed by the Yolo County Office of Education.

Colleges and universities[]

  • University of California, Davis
  • Woodland Community College

Communities[]

Water tower at University of California, Davis

Cities[]

Census-designated places[]

  • Clarksburg
  • Dunnigan
  • Esparto
  • Guinda
  • Knights Landing
  • Madison
  • Monument Hills
  • University of California, Davis
  • Yolo

Other unincorporated communities[]

  • Brooks
  • Capay
  • El Macero
  • Plainfield
  • Rumsey
  • Zamora

Population ranking[]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Yolo County.[35]

county seat

Rank City/town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Davis City 65,622
2 Woodland City 55,468
3 West Sacramento City 48,744
4 Winters City 6,624
5 University of California Davis CDP 5,786
6 Esparto CDP 3,108
7 Monument Hills CDP 1,542
8 Dunnigan CDP 1,416
9 Knights Landing CDP 995
10 Madison CDP 503
11 Yolo CDP 450
12 Clarksburg CDP 418
13 Guinda CDP 254
14 Rumsey Indian Rancheria[36] AIAN 77

See also[]

  • 1892 Vacaville–Winters earthquakes
  • List of school districts in Yolo County, California
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Yolo County, California

Notes[]

  1. ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  2. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.
  3. ^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  4. ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native

References[]

  1. ^ "Chronology". California State Association of Counties. http://www.counties.org/general-information/chronology. 
  2. ^ "Little Blue Ridge". Peakbagger.com. http://www.peakbagger.com/peak.aspx?pid=1180. 
  3. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06113.html. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Counties/Pages/FindACounty.aspx. 
  5. ^ "Yolo County, California: History and Information" (in en). http://www.ereferencedesk.com/resources/counties/california/yolo.html. 
  6. ^ Kroeber, Alfred Louis (1917) (in en). Arapaho Dialects, Volume 12, page 67. https://books.google.com/books?id=z04UAAAAYAAJ&q=%22Yodoi%22+village&pg=PA67. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. https://www.census.gov/geographies/reference-files/time-series/geo/gazetteer-files.html. 
  8. ^ "This Sacramento Valley town has sunk more than 2 feet in less than 10 years". February 5, 2019. https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-sacramento-valley-sinkage-20190204-story.html. 
  9. ^ Services, SIA Professional. "Yolobus Routes". http://www.yolobus.com/routes/index.php. 
  10. ^ "About | Unitrans" (in en). https://unitrans.ucdavis.edu/about/special-service-connections/. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named CA-DOJ-T11
  13. ^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/. 
  15. ^ "Counties by County and by District". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. http://wedrawthelines.ca.gov/downloads/meeting_handouts_072011/handouts_20110729_q2_cd_finaldraft_splits.zip. 
  16. ^ "California's 3rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/CA/3. 
  17. ^ "California's 6th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/CA/6. 
  18. ^ "Communities of Interest — County". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. http://wedrawthelines.ca.gov/downloads/meeting_handouts_072011/handouts_20110729_q2_sd_finaldraft_splits.zip. 
  19. ^ "Communities of Interest — County". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. http://wedrawthelines.ca.gov/downloads/meeting_handouts_072011/handouts_20110729_q2_ad_finaldraft_splits.zip. 
  20. ^ "County-by-County Map, California Propositions: The Los Angeles Times". Los Angeles Times. 2008-11-04. https://www.latimes.com/news/local/politics/cal/la-2008election-california-results,0,1293859.htmlstory?view=8&tab=0&fnum=0. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named CA-SS
  22. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  23. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  24. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  25. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  26. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  27. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  28. ^ "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau. http://www2.census.gov/census_2010/01-Redistricting_File--PL_94-171/California/. 
  29. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census.html. 
  30. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu. 
  31. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/ca190090.txt. 
  32. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs/phc-t4/tables/tab02.pdf. 
  33. ^ Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named popest
  34. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov. 
  35. ^ CNMP, US Census Bureau. "This site has been redesigned and relocated. - U.S. Census Bureau". https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade.2010.html. 
  36. ^ Staff, Website Services & Coordination. "2010 Census Interactive Population Map (Text Version) - U.S. Census Bureau". https://www.census.gov/2010census/popmap/ipmtext.php?fl=3265. 


External links[]

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